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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in cultural ritual

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Mumming for the New Year

Mumming was long a popular entertainment for the dark time of the year. The Christmas and New Years or Hogmanay plays offered adventures, dragons and Saint George and other wild characters -- Turkish Knights or Kings became popular after the Crusades. They offered an opportunity for hijinks, costumes and ritual of course. But they had another important theme, too.

At heart the plays were about healing.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Rediscovering Cinco De Mayo

Its no big secret that Americans adore Mexican food and drink. Every time May 5 rolls around, we all want to get in on the celebration. Weirdly, the last time I visited Mexico, they didn't even seem to notice. Contrary to popular belief, Cinco De Mayo isn't actually "Mexican Independence Day." The state of Puebla does still
recognize the holiday, where they successfully defended themselves from an attempted French invasion back in 1862.

This year, if you wish to celebrate, why not do so with a little more authenticity, rather than getting bombed on tequila shots at your favorite Americanized version of the real deal? Here are some staple dishes that are fun and easy to concoct on your own:

    MAÍZ A LA PARRILLA MEXICANA (MEXICAN GRILLED CORN)
        4 ears corn
        1/2 cup mayonnaise
        1 1/2 cups sour cream
        1/4 cup freshly chopped cilantro leaves
        1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
        1 lime, juiced
        Red chili powder, to taste
       2 limes cut into wedges, for garnish
    Remove the husks of the corn but leave the core attached at the end so you have something to hold onto.
    Grill the corn on a hot grill or cast iron griddle pan until slightly charred. Turn it so it gets cooked evenly all over.
    Mix the mayonnaise, sour cream and cilantro together. Grate the Parmesan in another bowl. While the corn is still warm slather with mayonnaise mix. Squeeze lime juice over the corn and shower with Parmesan. Season with chili powder and serve with extra lime wedges.
    (Recipe from Tyler Florence)
    https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/tyler-florence/mexican-grilled-corn-recipe-1947651

TOMATILLO SALSA VERDE
https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/tomatillo_salsa_verde/

FRIJOLES REFRITOS (REFRIED BEANS)
http://mexicanfoodjournal.com/refried-beans/

After enjoying a tasty meal with these dishes, complimented with a little homemade sangria, give an offering of thanks to Centeotl, the Aztec God (or Goddess) of Maize. Burn some leftover corn husk from your meal with a little copal incense in an iron cauldron or other fire-safe device. If Centeotl doesn't grab your fancy, there are many Aztec Gods and Goddesses to choose from and read up on, if you visit the first ThoughtCo link below. Make a point this year to visit a local cultural center and educate yourself to the customs and art of a culture that you appreciate and are drawn to. La paz.

References:

https://www.history.com/topics/holidays/cinco-de-mayo


https://www.thoughtco.com/centeotl-the-aztec-god-of-maize-170309

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Pagans Must #StandWithStandingRock

I've been following the events on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, where hundreds (if not thousands) have gathered to protest the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL for short) for the better part of two months, though I've been dimly aware of the issue since last spring. As a native South Dakotan transplanted to Texas, I still follow news outlets from my beloved prairies, including several independent Native news agencies. When I started sharing posts about the growing camps of protectors -- community members prefer this term to protestors -- I was shocked and amazed when friends told me that my Facebook feed was the only place they were hearing about the situation. (The 1,172 mile pipeline, which will carry oil from North Dakota's Bakkan region, crosses the Missouri River in a number of places, threatening the only source of drinking water for many indigenous communities. Construction also threatens burial grounds and other culturally important sites for the Standing Rock Sioux. For a quick primer on the situation, go here and here.)

I've been heartened to see that the Pagan community has spoken out about the DAPL and has offered support to the protectors at Standing Rock. While I understand that many Pagans "don't like to be political," there is no question in my mind that we have a duty to stand with indigenous peoples everywhere, and in particular with Native American/First Nations peoples. For Pagans in the United States and Canada (and elsewhere in the Americas), the very land on which we stand and which we purport to venerate is the same land (and water, and air) threatened by the DAPL and projects like it. The environmental stakes alone should give us reason to stand up and say #NoDAPL and to support those seeking to prevent the "black snake" from being built across the nation's prairie heartland, from North Dakota all the way to Illinois. As earth-venerating people, I believe that it is incumbent upon us to stand up against environmental degradation -- as Al Gore famously said in Earth in the Balance, Paganism is the spiritual arm of the environmental movement. 

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I know about a pipeline being built here in Virginia, there have been a lot of newspaper articles on it. It looks like the state

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Reposted from Between the Shadows, November 12, 2014:

Remembrance Day is how Canadians acknowledge November 11th.  In the US it is Veterans Day.  These observances evolved out of Armistice Day, which continues to be observed in some countries (or simultaneously.)  There are commonalities but the focus is different.  Our identity of ourselves as a nation came from fighting together in World War I.  At that time, Canada was still a British colony, and most of us thought of ourselves as British (or French, under British occupation).  We became Canadians together at Vimy Ridge and Passchendaele.

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Thank you for sharing.

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Goddess Roots of Mardi Gras in New Orleans

With Mardi Gras just around the corner I thought I'd share an excerpt from my first published book, Sacred Places of Goddess: 108 Destinations.  You see, I lived the first thirty years of my life in New Orleans without a clue about the Pagan and Goddess roots of Mardi Gras.  When you live in that Christian bubble, you tend not look beyond it, but then when you do, a tsunami of awakening might be the result, as it was for me.....

Vieux Carre
The essence of Goddess, as a celebration of life, holds sway in New Orleans at the very core of the people, even if they're unaware of it.  Life there moves at a slower pace and New Orleanians see no reason to catch up. It is a city proud of its diverse cultural and ethnic heritage, where people look for just about any excuse to indulge in the pleasures of food, drink, and partying. There is a sense of life being a bit more in-sync with the natural rhythms and life’s simple pleasures. Despite the influence of the Catholic Church, the lifestyle in New Orleans is hardly dogmatic or puritanical. In the Big Easy, as the city is often called, the spirit of the Feminine is also reflected in the Old World charm of the architecture in the Vieux Carre, in celebrations such as Mardi Gras with its pagan roots dating back to the rituals of the Lupercalia, Cybele and Attis, and in the worship of the Virgin Mary, Our Lady of Guadalupe, and various goddesses in the Yoruban pantheon.

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Remembrance DayHello there, hope you all had a good Remembrance Day (or Veterans' Day in the US).  I though I would drop a quick note to share a link to an article I wrote at my other column, "Between the Shadows," because I figured this was definitely relevant to a Canadian Pagan's perspective.

"Spontaneous Ritual": Sable and a small conglomeration of local Pagans went to the cenotaph in their city to honor their war dead in a Pagan way. Instead they were witness to the birth of a communal ritual that brought their city together. Lest we forget.

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