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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Ariadnes Tribe

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Ariadne's Tribe: Reconstruction vs. revival

I spend a lot of time telling people that Ariadne's Tribe isn't a reconstructionist tradition. But the issue is actually a little more complicated than that.

When I was at Mystic South this past summer, one of the other presenters attended my workshop about our spiritual tradition. He came up to me afterward and pointed out that even though I had said we aren't a reconstructionist tradition, we use reconstructionist methods extensively. And that's quite true.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    You have a group of fellow travelers to work with and support each other on your journey. I think that is wonderful. I've recent

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
There's more than one Minoan goddess!

When I mention "Minoan," most people think of the famous Snake Goddess figurines. And many people think those figurines represent "the Minoan goddess," as if there were only one of them. But there are many Minoan goddesses, not just one.

In fact, there's a whole pantheon. Like everyone else in the Bronze Age Mediterranean, the Minoans were polytheists.

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Inclusive Minoan Spirituality Workshop at Mystic South

I had a marvelous time at Mystic South last weekend. I saw some old friends and met some new ones. I also gave a workshop about inclusive Minoan spirituality as we practice it in Ariadne's Tribe. I never know what to expect when I'm doing public events, but I was happily surprised that so many people were interested - we had to rustle up extra chairs so everyone would have a place to sit (thank you to the Mystic South volunteers and organizers for being so helpful with this!).

Though there were a lot of attendees at the conference, there are also a lot of people who didn't get to come. With that in mind, we recorded the workshop to share online. A big thank you to my daughter, who patiently babysat the equipment while I gave the presentation.

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The Minoan Sacred Year: A Modern Pagan Calendar

Most modern Pagans are familiar with the eightfold Wheel of the Year: the solstices and equinoxes and the points halfway in between.

But that's a modern construct, perfectly valid, just not something that goes back to the Bronze Age Mediterranean. It also doesn't match the unique seasons of the Mediterranean region, where Crete is located (and where the Minoans lived).

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The Blessing of the Waters: Building the Minoan Sacred Calendar

Since the Minoans aren't around anymore and we can't read the things they wrote (Linear A hasn't been deciphered), we have to build our Minoan spiritual practice based on whatever inspiration we can find.

It turns out, there are still remnants of ancient rites that cling to life in the folk practices of Crete and other parts of Europe in this Christian era. You probably already knew this: The Christian church took over Pagan practices and renamed them, like the Irish goddess Brigit becoming a Christian saint.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Alethea Leondakis
    Alethea Leondakis says #
    I only discovered this yesterday, but I believe in 2015 or 2016, the Phaistos discus was decoded. Here is a link where it is read
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I'm given to understand that in Venice there's a Great Blessing of the Waters to mark the beginning of sailing season; if Minoan C
  • Laura Perry
    Laura Perry says #
    That would be a separate rite and would involve Posidaeja, the Minoan sea goddess, rather than the spirits of local streams and la
I don't like changing my mind: an essay in the evolution of Ariadne's Tribe spiritual practice

One thing any researcher knows is that new information is liable to blow old theories to smithereens. The same holds true for Ariadne's Tribe, an evolving path that incorporates not just archaeological information but also shared gnosis as we work our way forward in spiritual practice.

I'll be the first to admit that I don't like having to change my views. Once I think I have something figured out, it's very pleasant to just hang there, in that space, all smug and satisfied. But I've learned the hard way that nothing is that easy, not just in archaeology but also in spirituality.

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Ariadne's Tribe: Reviving ancient spirituality

I've been in relationship with the Minoan deities since I was a teenager, but it was only a few years ago that inclusive Minoan spirituality began to take shape as a specific spiritual path. I've been walking that path with the lovely folks in Ariadne's Tribe, and together we're creating a tradition that works for us as Pagans in the modern world. The hardest part, believe it or not, is explaining what we do to other people.

We're combining the bits and pieces we know about ancient Minoan religion and culture in a modern Pagan context. We can't really reconstruct ancient Minoan religious practice in detail. There are too many gaps in our knowledge, we don't live in the same kind of culture the Minoans did, and we probably don't want to go back to sacrificing bulls and goats (and possibly people) anyway.

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