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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in ancestors

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Blood Mysteries

The blood mysteries, they have called to me for years. The calling felt distant, an eery echo in an old worn in cave that lived deep within my wombspace, the house of my ancestors. 

I remember watching the movie "The Passion of the Christ" when it was first released in the theatre. Never mind that Mary Magdalene was portrayed as a prostitute, despite the inaccuracy of the connection between her and the prostitue in the New Testament I was glued to the two women in the film, the characters of Mother Mary and Mary the Magdalene. There were two scenes in particular that stood out to me. Watching Mother Mary run towards a falling Jesus during His long walk with His cross while the camera in slow motion flashed back to Mary running to catch a young child Jesus that was tripping and falling is one of the two scenes that has always stuck with me. The other scene that stood out to me included both Mary's and the wife of Pilot, the man who washed his hands of Jesus' fate. In this scene Jesus' bloody and torn body has been dragged away after being viscously flogged publicly leaving behind pools of blood. Pilot's wife approaches the Mary's with a handful of white cloths, silently both Mary's get down on their knees and begin to mop up the blood, when the cloth is used up they take the shawls from atop their heads and begin to soak up His blood with that. I was young in my journey when this movie came out and fresh to my 20's, as I watched alongside an avid born again Christian roommate I knew that I was witnessing something profound, something sacred. 
 
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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
In the Time of Reconciliation

Today we honor--even celebrate--balance. We acknowledge that from this swift point onward the nights will grow longer and longer until the Solstice. With that acknowledgement, we also ken that balance is not a static thing but a pause in the clockwork of the universe before we move on, and in.

Every six weeks there is this hinge in the year. Friends who serve as Christian clergy have looked askance when I (mock wearily) reply this way to their query about "Pagan holidays." They assume that there must be major and minor ones because they shiver to think of Christmas or Easter every six weeks, relentlessly rolling on through this beautiful and never-ending cycle that many of us refer to as the Wheel of the Year.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Wow, you are one of the few Pagans I know who discusses reparation, let alone how important it is. Rock on! I stress its importan
PaganNewsBeagle Airy Monday Sept 22

Happy Equinox! (It's so fun that the whole planet shares this holiday!) Today our Airy Monday feed focuses on archaeology and space science, with revelations from Greece, European ancestors, Venus figurines, Mars exploration and the wonders of studying space. Enjoy your Monday!

Anyone who follows Greek archaeology will enjoy these recent revelations from a mysterious tomb at Amphipolis.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_osireionNut.jpgLast night an old friend came to me in a dream.  He has been a genuine soul-mate, both before and after his earthly passing.  Our affair of the heart was stormy, but in matters of spirit he always drew me to my best self.  I blocked him out for many years, but for a while now have been aware of his benevolent and supportive presence.  And he is not the only one.  On the periphery of my awareness there is a veritable cloud of witnesses, as one sacred text refers to those who have crossed over.  I don’t seek them out so often as I simply know them to be with me and part of me. 

Not unlike contemporary Pagans, ancient Egyptians had a complex set of ideas about the afterlife which often look like contradictions without study and reflection.  After the weighing of the heart in the Hall of Maat one might ascend to the sky as an “imperishable star” along with other ancestors.  Or one might face defeat by the monster Ammit should the heart be out of balance.  Most Egyptians simply hoped to live in comfort and happiness in a new world beyond.  Those of a more religious ilk imagined detailed journeys through the Duat, including encounters with all manner of beings and neteru (gods).  They understood this trip to be an alchemical sort of transformative process, describing the path of spiritual development. 

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

Bastet-188x269.jpg

We stroked his head and ran our hands along his body. He purred. We looked at him directly in the eyes and we sang songs. He purred. We told him of mice and birds and long summer days that would not end. He purred. We held him close, so very close, as the needle pierced his skin. The purring stopped. 

The last few days have been filled with tears and with fond remembrances of our dear cat, Bear Claw. He lived for almost twenty years. I have children that have never known a time before Bear Claw. Simply put, he was part of our family.

I spent the last year of his life as a care giver of sorts. As his health failed, I cleaned up after him. I helped him up to his favourite perches around the house. I carried him out into the warm sun on my shoulders and made sure his "apartment" was warm and comfortable. He and I spoke about how and when his life would end. We had an agreement that when the good days were outnumbered by the bad days, we'd part ways mercifully and quickly.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Gwion Raven
    Gwion Raven says #
    Thank you Archer - As an update, Bear Claw's ashes are now on our Beloved Dead altar. Seems that there's more for us to do with ou
  • Archer
    Archer says #
    I appreciate the insight that animals have something of the divine in them--consider how they survive, thrive, communicate and mig
  • Gwion Raven
    Gwion Raven says #
    Thank you Francesca. How lovely and fascinating that our work in the world seems so much in alignment. Life, with all of its wonde
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Indeed, indeed!
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Sorry to hear of yr loss. Blessings on yr family and departed kitty. I read your bio here. It sounds exactly like what I have tau
PaganNewsBeagle Faithful Friday August 22

It's Faithful Friday, and we have a cascade of articles on how faith — Pagan, Heathen, polytheist, or Christian, Muslim, Buddhist -- affects our lives, our planet, our societies. Theology of Ebola, What Would Krishna Do?, introverted Paganism, honoring our ancestors, and a Pagan Time Capsule fill this edition. Enjoy your weekend!

Is sickness an indication of divine wrath? It's not a trivial question, as demonstrated in this article from Slate on how the Ebola outbreak in Africa is influenced by belief in the omnipotence of the Almighty.

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Pagan savings challenge, week thirty-one:  the write stuff

Pictured is an antique writing desk on an antique table, with a coffee cup depicting the logo for a fighter jet which is probably also an antique.  We'd hoped to turn this space into an ancestor shrine, but it just hasn't happened yet.  Likewise, this probably would have been a post about how savings honor's one ancestors, but it isn't.  Instead, it's just a stupid pun.

My week thirty-one savings:  $496, 6.25% ($31) of which I added today.

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