Woodspriestess: Exploring the intersection between Nature, the Goddess, art, and poetry.

Listening to the woods, to the stones, to Gaia, and to women...

In the woods behind my house rest a collection of nine large flat rocks. Daily, I walk down to these “priestess rocks” for some sacred time alone to pray, meditate, consider, and be. Often, while in this space, I open my mouth and poetry comes out. I’ve come to see this experience as "theapoetics"—experiencing the Goddess through direct “revelation,” framed in language. As Stanley Hopper originally described in the 1970’s, it is possible to “…replace theology, the rationalistic interpretation of belief, with theopoetics, finding God[dess] through poetry and fiction, which neither wither before modern science nor conflict with the complexity of what we know now to be the self.” Theapoetics might also be described, “as a means of engaging language and perception in such a way that one enters into a radical relation with the divine, the other, and the creation in which all occurs.”

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Molly

Molly

Molly has been “gathering the women” to circle, sing, celebrate, and share since 2008. She plans and facilitates women’s circles, Red Tents, seasonal retreats and rituals, Pink Tent mother-daughter circles, and family ceremonies from her tiny temple space in rural Missouri and teaches online courses in Red Tent facilitation and Practical Priestessing.

Molly is a priestess who holds MSW, M.Div, and D.Min degrees. She finished her dissertation about contemporary priestessing in the U.S. She is the author of Womanrunes, Earthprayer, and The Red Tent Resource Kit. Molly and and her husband Mark co-create Story Goddesses, original goddess sculptures, mini goddesses, pendants, and ceremony kits at Brigid’s Grove (http://brigidsgrove.com), where they also publish Womanrunes book and deck sets.

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Deck Review: The Herbcrafter's Tarot

As a long-term fan of The Gaian Tarot, I eagerly awaited receipt of the new Herbcrafter’s Tarot deck illustrated by Joanna Powell Colbert and written by Latisha Guthrie. I knew from the first card that I was in b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_8376.jpglove. The illustrations for the Herbcrafter’s Tarot are exquisite and breathtaking. Even the precise detail of the illustration on the back of the deck as a whole is enchanting. It has become my favorite card-back illustration of all time, the little tincture bottles, butterflies, and sprigs of herbs prompting a sense of discovery and joy every time I touch one. Instead of immediately shuffling the deck and drawing a card, which is how I usually approach a new deck, I made the decision to approach The Herbcrafter’s Tarot card by card, day by day, even (mostly) resisting the urge to peek ahead at the cards to come. It is truly a deck to be savored and I knew from the third card that I could recommend it wholeheartedly to others.

Drawing inspiration from the shared Celtic heritage of the authors as well as from Latisha’s Mexican-American heritage, The Herbcrafter’s Tarot is a sister deck in many ways to The Gaian Tarot. Like a traditional tarot deck, it includes 78 cards. The 22 cards of the Major Arcana follow an herbcrafter’s journey. The Minor Arcana cards are divided in four suits, aligned with the four elements: Air (Swords), Fire b2ap3_thumbnail_66007504_2368806219998253_6388625486133592064_n.jpg(Wands), Water (Cups), and Earth (Pentacles).  Each card contains a detailed colored pencil drawing in photorealistic style. Each card is alive with vibrant detail and thoughtful connection, most of the illustrations containing very subtle nods to the original major and minor arcana cards of traditional tarot decks. Depending on the suit and type of plant, some of the herbs are shown in the act of being prepared or harvested, in use in baths or teas, or in their native environment. The People cards for each suit, depicting the hands of women healers at work, have been titled according to the archetypes each woman embodies as she “matures into her craft from wonderer to warrior to midwife to teacher.” The skilled, creative, intuitive hands of Hijas (daughters), Adelitas (warriors), Madres (mothers), and Curanderas (healers) are represented in the People cards. Accustomed as I am to the faces and personalities of the people depicted in full in The Gaian Tarot, I did find myself sometimes missing that human component and wanting to see who is “behind the scenes” of the beautiful herbal layouts, nature mandalas, works in progress, and the gnarled hands at work in The Herbcrafter’s Tarot. The inclusion of scenes, plants, and hands rather than faces is intentional, however, because the primary perspective of the deck is from that of the plants.

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  • Anne Newkirk Niven
    Anne Newkirk Niven says #
    What a wonderful review, I love this deck, too!
  • Molly
    Molly says #
    I'm really in love with it! I keep thinking of more things I should have added to the review--it is visually "nourishing," I find.

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 Goddess of the sacred pauseb2ap3_thumbnail_62007434_2349438221935053_7755860314008059904_o.jpg
 please grant me the courage
to lay aside swiftness
and take up slowness,
to embrace limitations as learning,
silence as stabilizing,
waiting as worthy,
and sitting as divine.
Goddess of the sacred pause
help me to know stillness as strength,
patience as powerful,
and healing time
as holy necessity.

I fell down hard this week and injured my ankle pretty badly. It has been hard to go from the magic of mobility, to spending time in bed with my leg elevated and an ice pack on. As is common to note when dealing with an unexpected experience, I am noticing how very much I took for granted my own swift movements through the day, the everydayness of being able to easily get myself where I need to go.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Molly, Very nice prayer and thanks for sharing. I had a hiking accident a couple days ago, which was (thankfully) minor and did n
  • Molly
    Molly says #
    Thank you! I'm glad you were okay after your accident too. This has highlighted for me how fortunate I am to usually be able to mo
  • Diana Amis
    Diana Amis says #
    First, Thank you so much for this prayer. I have no idea why it resonated so much with me at this time. I want to say I'm not inju
  • Molly
    Molly says #
    Thank you so much for commenting. I'm honored that you chose to do so. May your tender heart be renewed and soothed. Many blessin

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
You are infinitely capable.
You are infinitely tender.b2ap3_thumbnail_60093714_2327385934140282_7348583357195747328_o.jpg
You are infinitely precious. 
 
This weekend we gathered in the Red Tent for an exploration and celebration of our root chakra. We wore all red, brought red and root-related foods for dinner, and drank a rich ruby-red tea of rooibos, dandelion root, and ginger.
 
We passed a root, instead of our usual rattle, and I asked this question, which I now share with you:
 
“I am a woman [person] with a body. For that I offer no explanation, shame, excuse or apology. In a culture obsessed with women shrinking, confidence is controversial. It is courage. I’m taking my peace back.”
 
-Erin Brown
 
What would it feel like for you to take your own peace back?
 
Some of the women heard the word "piece" instead of "peace," which add another layer of exploration for this question (as: the pieces of your puzzle, a piece of the pie, a piece for yourself):
 
What would it feel like to take your own piece back?
 
May you nourish your roots
and sing in the sun.
 
b2ap3_thumbnail_60228822_2328220570723485_4904029401290637312_o.jpg
 
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I woke with the smellb2ap3_thumbnail_58639012_2319362924942583_1704575264542949376_o.jpg
of Belfire still in my hair
and knelt in a circle
of hawthorn and roses
to bless my brow, cheeks,
and neck with dew.
I heard the sound of
hooves on leaf and stone
and saw three deer leaping
away through the woods.
I lifted my arms to sun
exhilarated with wild enchantment.
What a blessing it is to live
right here, right now.

Good May Morning!

This week you might wish to pick or buy flowers for your home, to add touches that give you a sense of warmth and hominess, or light candles or diffuse oils near you while you go about your household tasks.

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May I soften
my heart
and then soften

b2ap3_thumbnail_54206190_2285105858368290_6049333235937181696_o.jpgagain
and
again. 

May I remember how
to breathe deeply
and expand.

There is something
within
crying out
to be excavated
turned over
revealed
rebirthed
and nourished.

May I listen. 

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“Please prepare me b2ap3_thumbnail_53747485_2286272294918313_8837729538982019072_o.jpg
to be a sanctuary.
Pure and holy
tried and true.
With thanksgiving
I’ll be a living
sanctuary
for you.”

Beautiful Chorus (Hymns of Spirit)

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 "The world's full of people who have stopped listening to themselves," wrote mythologist Joseph Campbell. It's imperative that you NOT be one of those folks. 2019 should be the Year of Listening Deeply to Yourself. That means being on high alert for your inner inklings, your unconscious longings, and the still, small voice at the heart of your destiny. If you do that, you'll discover I'm right when I say that you're smarter than you realize.

       --Rob Brezsny

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Meredith Everwhite
    Meredith Everwhite says #
    Beautiful, and so synchronicitous & relevant for this time. I just wrote and posted a "water oracle" message on my personal blog o
  • Molly
    Molly says #
    I missed seeing your comment before today, but thanks so much for being here, listening, and sharing this experience!

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