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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Wyrd

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Great Rite of the Moment

In the end, the goddess and god of the witches are Being and Being-in-Duration: Mother Nature and Father Time, one might say.

And we live in the Great Rite of the Moment.

We think of Time as composed of Past, Present, and Future.

But that's not how the ancestors saw it.

Their archaic world-view is preserved in the English tense system.

The Old Language of the Hwicce—the original Anglo-Saxon Tribe of Witches—had only two “tenses”: past and non-past.

That's why we say I was and I am, but when we want to talk about what has not yet happened, we have to say I will be.

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Nine Weeks of Energy Clearing: Week 1—The Wyrd (Karma) of Used Things

Used things can be a boon or a bane. Often, it’s a bit of both.

Ritual purification was (and still is) a huge thing in many polytheist traditions, including Heathenry. For nine posts (give or take some extras), nine being a holy number, I’m going to focus on simple ways to examine the energy entering our lives and help keep it clean. For me, that’s a part of preparing for and welcoming the purifying aspects of Imbolc (Disablot/Tyr’s feast for some Heathens), prior Spring Equinox’s renewal.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Thinking Third Thoughts

Robert Cochrane (1931-1966), father of the contemporary Old Craft movement, was wont to say that the true name of the witch goddess is Fate (Cochrane 25). Yet he writes to Joseph Wilson in 1966 that the “prime duty of the Wise” is to “overcome fate” (Cochrane 23).

What is one to make of this?

Permit me to draw on the traditional vocabulary of the Elder Witcheries and to reframe the discussion in terms of “Wyrd.” Wyrd was anciently seen both as a goddess and as the inherent pattern of things: what Is, the sum total of everything that has happened until now, and the cumulative momentum towards the future inherent in that pattern. In the most abstract sense, one could say that the witches' goddess is Being, as the witches' god is Duration: in effect, Mother Nature and Father Time.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
My favorite of dainas that mention Laima.

This, dear Wyrd, is what you've given me:
firm tits,
a long neck,
and a pug nose.
It's all mine.
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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
You'll Never Outrun Wyrd

In the corpus of Latvian dainas—folksongs—no goddess is mentioned more often than Laima: Fate, Moira, Wyrd. Everyone acknowledges that she's the most powerful of them all. In some dainas she's said to be more powerful even than Dievs (Heaven/God) himself, but in the poems nonetheless she's generally addressed in the most intimate and personal terms: “my Laima,” “my dear Laima,” “dearest Laima,” the folksongs say. Euphemism perhaps, but what is closer than one's own wyrd?

Robert Cochrane once wrote that the true Goddess of Witches is Fate. In the raksti, the traditional symbol-motifs of Latvian folk art, Laima's symbol is the broom. In the end, she sweeps everything before her.

When translating dainas, I always aim for a poem that sounds as if it could have been written originally in English; hence my choice of “Wyrd” over “Laima” or “Fate”: translating one heathenry with another.

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