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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in worship

Posted by on in Studies Blogs

I recently wrote about what it meant to priest for the Goddess. In it I quoted, noted Buddhist roshi, Pat Enkyo O'Hara, who once said, "When asked of all the wisdom traditions why Zen, I said, because I live a life of Zen."  In a reframe, I suggested that I live a life of Goddess. Many have messaged me to clarify what I mean by that?

Goddess is the everyday constant in my life. She is the immanent divine within me, around me, the all and the vast nothing; but also the transcendent manifestation standing before me. She is the totality of my life experiences, regardless of circumstance, and I manifest the life I have in Her service because She is worship for me. I confess worship is one of my favorite words. When I was growing up my grandmother would say, “Worship is a verb!” Meaning that there was more to being a Christian than just showing up on Sunday morning or worse, just at Christmas and Easter! She was not wrong, as worship is in fact both a noun and a verb.  But what is worship? 'Worship is the action of religious devotion often directed towards a deity."

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  • Connie Lazenby
    Connie Lazenby says #
    Every word resonates within me and expresses worship so much better than I ever could, thank you.
  • Courtney Weber
    Courtney Weber says #
    Beautiful, Erick! Thank you once again!
Setting Up a Shrine: One Kemetic's Method, Part I: Home Shrine

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  • Brea Saunders
    Brea Saunders says #
    I appreciate how basic this is. While harboring devotion to the Egyptian gods for a while I am only recently beginning to look in
  • Sihathor
    Sihathor says #
    Thanks! The impression I've gotten (if my rusty memory serves--and if it doesn't, I apologize--it's been several years since I loo
  • Sihathor
    Sihathor says #
    Please excuse the typos, there was a lot I wanted to say, and I'm still getting a hang of the formatting/comment system here!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Devotional Forms: Storytelling

 

While debate rages on in other corners of the web about what kinds of Gods we do or don’t believe in, I have been thinking about the way that we worship whatever/whomever we hold dear, sacred, and holy. I decided a series of posts that tackle this question from a deeply personal point of view would be useful to me, and perhaps to a few readers as well. I have also been thinking about shadows, storytelling, and ceremonies-so it seemed natural that I would start there.

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  • Naya Aerodiode
    Naya Aerodiode says #
    To tell a story is to take one on a journey through another realm, places of infinite possibility, to bring back the treasures of
  • Miss Bri Saussy
    Miss Bri Saussy says #
    Beautifully said Naya!
  • Stifyn Emrys
    Stifyn Emrys says #
    What a fascinating topic. As a writer, I love to engage in storytelling with pen and ink, but although I've sung and spoken in fro
  • Miss Bri Saussy
    Miss Bri Saussy says #
    I have also heard Neil Gaiman read and how wonderful it is. I actually think reading aloud is a great practice for those who want
  • Stifyn Emrys
    Stifyn Emrys says #
    As I write, I pay a lot of attention to rhythm, cadence and variance in the words I'm using. That would be a very interesting work

Posted by on in Studies Blogs

You may have heard, as it was not without its own bit of controversy, that the Temple of Witchcraft has bought property in Salem, NH, and is doing a fund drive for our parking lot. Why start with a parking lot? Simple: no parking lot, no temple. To gain the town's approval, a religious organization in a residential zone requires a paved lot with adequate space, lighting, and drainage.

Beyond the parking lot itself, some have asked why do Pagans, Wiccans and Witches need a temple at all? Aren't we meant to practice solitary, or in small groups in people's homes, or outside? And if I'm not in the Salem, NH, area, why should this even matter to me? All important questions and here are some thoughts in response to many of the discussions I've had with people over the last few months:

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  • Stephanie Noble
    Stephanie Noble says #
    Thank you for this article! I have very often thought the same.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

This post is the first of a new series, a series on places where worship took place in ancient Hellas. In future installments, I will talk about the household, about temples, about caves, springs, and other special places. A little while ago, I spoke about nature religions, and how I feel Hellenismos is not a nature religion in the Neo-Pagan sense. Because I like to make life difficult for myself, I will now write a post which basically says that the ancient Hellenes practiced much of their worship in nature, partly in sacred groves. Before reading this post, it might be good to read the post about Hellenismos and nature religions first.

For me, the most famous of groves is one written about by Sophocles, in Oedipus at Colonus, amongst others, the grove of the Erinyes, which is entered by a spiritually polluted Oedipus, for a rest, and to relieve his suffering. It is here that his daughters tend to him and perform sacrifice to the Erinyes in his name:

"My daughter, if thou seest a resting place 
On common ground or by some sacred grove, 
Stay me and set me down."
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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    This is great stuff, and so relevant for those of us who honor the Theoi! My thanks for finding it and sharing with us.
  • Constance Tippett Chandler
    Constance Tippett Chandler says #
    Dear Elani, It seems to me that you may have misunderstood what Gus was saying about "nature religion". The very fact that the He
  • Elani Temperance
    Elani Temperance says #
    Dear Constance, It may very wel be that I have misunderstood Gus's point. It still does nto change the situation in ancient Hella

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

 

 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Being a devotee of *cough* "lesser-known" Deities does occasionally suck. In my case, while I honor well-known Deities such as Hermes and The Muses and Artemis and Hekate, I am also very devoted to The Charites.

The usual response to that statement is "who?"

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