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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in tree of life

b2ap3_thumbnail_BlessingSimpleBasic2012-02Sm.jpgNotes: 

 

1) The tree of life represents all of reality. Reality extends past the mundane plane. 

 

2) Only speaking for myself, I am a theist who experiences all of reality—the Tree of Life—as my Goddess: I feel Her in my surroundings, reap the fruits of Her loving care, and experience magic as the Goddess and Her love made manifest.

 

Oh, Tree of Life,

You Who Are Tree Mother, Great Mother,

Great Mother Creator of All beings,

please bring me power, joy, and wholeness.

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  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    This is truly lovely, Francesca. When someone asks me about my Tree of Life ring, I usually say it's the Druid's Oak. Then I tel
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Flatterer! Joking aside, what you share already is perfect, so your wanting to add anything I said pleases me immensely. I love yo

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Tree with Suns

Check out this early 5th-century gilded silver pendant from West Gotland in Sweden.

If Stockholm University's Anders Andrén is right, this is an image of the ancestral universe.

According to Andrén, what at first looks like an abstract design—known to art historians as a pelta (“shield”) or mushroom-shaped design—is actually the World Tree (Andrén 140).

(Andrén does not say why it is that, if so, the World Tree's branching volutes should end in animal [=serpent?] heads, although the design has parallels in other contemporary art from Gotland [Andrén 141]. My own eisigesis [= ”reading in”] would be that here we see the Tree of Life resolving into animal life.)

At the top, we see the long-rayed zenith Sun, flanked by the short-rayed Suns of Sunrise and Sunset.

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  • Tyger
    Tyger says #
    What a beautiful way of looking at the world!

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

  b2ap3_thumbnail_ceiba-in-rain.jpg b2ap3_thumbnail_ceiba-vieques.jpg

    "Why is the ceiba sacred?"  I learned in school that the ceiba pentandra was Puerto Rico's official national tree.  Mrs. Flores, my elementary school teacher, explained that the Taínos, the island's Native Indigenous habitants, considered the ceiba a sacred tree. 

...
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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Twists and Turns

Long time, no write. Although I do have three drafts started on the Word app on my tablet, my son had commandeered my tablet after his high school graduation and I had only been lucky enough to touch it two brief times since then.  

Now that I'm on a training trip away from my family, I find that I have pockets of free time.  And, bonus, I have my laptop back!  Had to use it when I worked from home for a large retail company.  But now that I'm in training for another work-at-home job (much better than the previous one), I get to have it back.  At some point I will grab my tablet and transfer the drafted blogs and post them.  So I was getting ready to leave my training day thinking that all I wanted to do was sit and decompress and write when I received a lovely "missing you" email, gently reminding me that I have a warm place to write - exactly what was on my brain.  Someone was reading my thoughts.

...
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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Is the Yule Tree an Ancient Pagan Custom?

Short answer: No.

In his magisterial Stations of the Sun, Ron Hutton explains that in many places the ancestors were wont to deck their holidays with whatever greenery and flowers were then in season (34): at Midsummer, with broadleafs, at Midwinter, with evergreens.

But there's no evidence at all in antiquity for decorated trees per se at Midwinter. The modern Yule tree, rather, has its roots in Renaissance Germany: ironically, the period of the Great Persecution.

So it's really a Christian custom.

The operative question here is: does it matter?

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I've come across two stories about the origin of the Christmas tree. The 1st one is that the ancient Germans had a sacred Oak tre

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Tree Rune

Soon a dark stranger will come to stand in the living room, and the house will fill with the smell of the forest.

It's an odd custom, fraught with mystery, and equally mysterious is the fact that the decked tree—for all its iconic status as the veritable embodiment of the holiday—has inspired so little music.

Forthwith, a meditation on the mysteries of what novelist Richard Grant calls the “seedling of Yggdrasil.”

And if someone should feel inspired to write a tune, so much the better.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Quick work, Mabnahash; I can't wait to hear. One moment while I consult the technomeisters.....
  • Mabnahash
    Mabnahash says #
    I wrote a tune for this, but I can't figure out how to post it here. Maybe it's not possible with the site?

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Tree of Dawn

In Latvian lore, not much is remembered of Austra—the goddess whose sister-selves include the other Dawn goddesses of the Indo-European diaspora: Ushas, Eos, Aurora, Ostara, Easter, among others—except for her name and her symbol.

Each of the Old Gods of the Baltic pantheon is associated with a particular sigil that has been faithfully transmitted through folk-art—in particular weaving and embroidery—down to our own day. Saule (Sun) has a sun-wheel, Mēness (Moon) a crescent, Pērkons (Thunder) the thunder-cross (fylfot), and the like (Dzērvītis112ff.).

Since Austra, by her very nature, does not readily lend herself to depiction—how does one draw a picture of light, of color?—her symbol is Austras koks, “Austra's tree.” This makes eminent sense, since trees capture both the first and last light of the day, even when the Sun is not yet (or is no longer) above the horizon. In Latvian lore Austra's tree is said to have copper roots, silver leaves, and golden branches (Dzērvītis 115).

Read figuratively, this describes the colors of the great Tree of the East as it shines with the new light of dawn. Read literally, the image may sound to the modern ear both artificial and unnatural. But to the ancestors, for whom the natural was commonplace and artifice precious, the image would have expressed the transformation of the everyday into the extraordinary.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    "Dawn, shining raccoon...."
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I remember seeing some mornings back in high school when the early light shown down through the trees. I never met a pretty girl

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