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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Terry Pratchett
Overheard at the Intergalactic Witches' Cotillion

The voice was unmistakably that of Discworld's Nanny Ogg, in full Impart mode to a junior colleague.

Of all things, she was talking about the show Bewitched.

“Terrible programme, full of inaccuracies,” she said. “That's why we had to have it canceled.”

So it was the witches themselves that got Bewitched canceled?

“Of course it was,” says Nanny. “Not that I had anything against it myself, mind you.”

She takes a pull from her hip flask.

“As a matter of fact, it even confirmed several of my favorite biases,” she says proudly.

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Where Summer Lives: Recovering Pagan Sweat Traditions

Och, it's the hairy armpit of Winter.

Here in the North, Winter has a cold armpit. The lakes and streams are all frozen, and who wants to strip off in this cold anyway? Get wet and face hypothermia.

Even for those of us fortunate enough to live with central heat and hot running water (and thank Goddess for them both), bathe or shower too frequently and—in our Winter Desert air—you'll shred your own dry hide with the itching.

That's why the gods gave us saunas.

The sweats that I've attended at festivals have all been structured along Native American—in fact, Lakota—lines. There's a reason for this.

The sweat is a Circumpolar tradition. When those very first ancestral Americans entered this continent, they brought their sweat traditions along with them. Time was, pretty much every Indigenous People here had their own.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Alvina
    Alvina says #
    Agnostic culture is exceptionally open to the Sweat Lodge. It is a function that is frequently shrouded in secret in light of the

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
In Search of the Tusked God

 Caput apri defero,

cum ingenti priapo.

 

The Yule-analogous holiday of Terry Pratchett's Discworld is, of course, Hogswatch.

And the—really, what else can one call him?—patronal god of Hogswatch is, of course, the Hogfather.

Like the wild boar that he originally was, the Hogfather (of the BBC series, anyway) wears tusks.

In Norse, one might say: Hogfather = Frey. Tusk-Frey, one might kenningly call him.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I do enjoy ham at Yule-time.
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    On the Franconian side of the family, the custom is to serve pork and sauerkraut at the New Year, but never chicken. That's so you
  • Mark Green
    Mark Green says #
    And happy Hogswatch to you as well, Steven! I've really enjoyed your writing this year.
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Much obliged, Mark, and wishing you a New Year of prosperity, health, and good reading.
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    My recollection is that Snorri says, "an antler," which strongly suggests a weapon in hand (in place of the sword he gave to Skirn
Pagan News Beagle: Airy Monday, September 28

One Pagan lists her favorite "witchy" movies, a transwoman discusses her complicated relationship with Ranma 1/2, and the late Terry Pratchett's legacy is discussed. It's Airy Monday, our weekly take on magic and religion in popular culture. All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Thinking Third Thoughts

Robert Cochrane (1931-1966), father of the contemporary Old Craft movement, was wont to say that the true name of the witch goddess is Fate (Cochrane 25). Yet he writes to Joseph Wilson in 1966 that the “prime duty of the Wise” is to “overcome fate” (Cochrane 23).

What is one to make of this?

Permit me to draw on the traditional vocabulary of the Elder Witcheries and to reframe the discussion in terms of “Wyrd.” Wyrd was anciently seen both as a goddess and as the inherent pattern of things: what Is, the sum total of everything that has happened until now, and the cumulative momentum towards the future inherent in that pattern. In the most abstract sense, one could say that the witches' goddess is Being, as the witches' god is Duration: in effect, Mother Nature and Father Time.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Pins

Where I come from, we call it Witchcraft.

Where I come from, we call it Voodoo.

Voodoo? Isn't that all dead people, and sticking pins in dolls?

Witchcraft? Isn't that all dancing around without your drawers on, and sticking pins in dolls?

Hmm. I see what you mean.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Everybody knows that witches don't have leaders. Granny Weatherwax is the leader the witches don't have.

The knock came late. The boy looked scared when Granny opened the door.

“What?” she said.

“Mistress Weatherwax, come quick: the cow kicked Mrs. Brown and she's hurt bad and she's gone into labor early,” said the boy.

“You don't need me,” said Granny, “You need the midwife.”

“It's the midwife that sent me,” said the boy.

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