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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in sun goddess
Sacred Guardians: A Minoan-Themed Protection Spell

Today I'm sharing a spell/ritual from the new second edition of my book Ancient Spellcraft. It calls on the power of the griffin, an ancient mythological creature of great power. We have recently rediscovered the Minoan sun goddess Therasia and come to realize that the griffins are hers. If you like, you can call on her directly as you perform this ceremony. I do recommend that you develop a relationship with any deity you call on for spells and rituals, since they're not cosmic vending machines (you put in an offering and out pops a goodie).

 

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The Minoan Sun Goddess: Hail Therasia!

Over in Ariadne's Tribe, we've been chasing the Minoan sun goddess for some time now. It has long been a given that there is a Minoan sun goddess; Nanno Marinatos even wrote a book that's largely about her, without being able to properly identify her (and clinging far too heavily to some of Sir Arthur Evans' ideas, in my opinion, but that's a rant for another day). Several of us have had dreams and visions of the Minoan sun goddess, and folk dance from around the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean enshrines a regional sun goddess even today. So who is she? What are her symbols? How can we connect with her?

We believe her name is Therasia, and she is the goddess whose throne so famously sits in a room just off the central courtyard in the Knossos temple complex. If you look closely at the front of that throne, you'll see the sun rising over the double-peaked sacred summit of Mt. Juktas. But there are far more clues than just the carving on the front of the throne.

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