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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in presidential election

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Searching for Normalcy in November

This is a very stressful time for many of us. The news inundates us every day to remind us just how stressed we are right now in 2020. We've certainly had enough to contend with this year, but so many things seem to be riding on the outcome of our presidential election on November 3rd. That this level of stress could stretch on for days after tomorrow almost feels unbearable.

I was fortunate to share an insightful chat with Mary Ellen Pride recently, who will be my next featured guest on November's "Women Who Howl at the Moon" podcast. Mary Ellen was voted as "Milwaukee's Best Psychic" in the Shepherd Express for 6 years in a row. She has over 40 years of professional experience and was a leader in the California-based group, Covenant of the Goddess, with which prolific author and activist, Starhawk, is affiliated.

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America-watchers around the world must be shaking their heads and wondering what the flock is going on here.

For the last four years, the basic institutions of American democracy—the stability of which most of us (and let this be a lesson to us) have taken utterly for granted—have been systematically dismantled by a corrupt and honorless cadre of strongmen who care only for power at any price, backed by their dupe-army of fetus-worshipers and White Power malicious...um, militias. For all their rhetoric, the Opposition are the ones now revealed as the true Haters of America.

Now, when the Super-spreader-in-Chief loses the election—which he will—some are predicting blood in the streets and, in essence, Civil War II.

Is America falling apart?

Well—for what it's worth—I, for one, don't think so. The fact that American checks and balances have survived the current mis-administration at all is a testimony to their institutional resilience, and to the creative brilliance which envisioned and created them in the first place.

Meanwhile, what do we do while waiting for trumpocalypse?

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Posch, Mr. Putin certainly got his money's worth, didn't he? I disagreed with many of President Reagan's policies. However,
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Judging from what I've seen at the grocery store a lot of people must be getting bombed on pumpkin spice everything. Not my parti

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Courting the Pagan Vote

In the dream, Katie and I are at Paganicon when Pete Buttigieg walks by.

(Actually, the entire coven is there, but apparently the rest of them are somewhere else at the time.)

We're standing by the bleachers (!) when this happens. (Remember, we're in Dream Country. In real life, there are no bleachers anywhere near the P-Con hotel.)

Katie greets Buttigieg and, remembering us, he returns the greeting. Apparently we had encountered him previously and invited him to a coven meeting. As he's tendering his regrets and explaining why he won't be able to make it (too busy with the campaign), I slip my arm around his waist and sit him down next to me on a bleacher.

(Even in the dream, I can't imagine doing this to any other presidential candidate. That he's gay too, and kind of cute, lends a certain intimacy to our interactions, there's no denying it.)

I notice as I do so that he's getting pudgy. “Too much bad campaign food,” I think.

Well, dreams are dreams, and reality is reality. But mark my words, for what I say is true.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Only two more cycles? Anthony, you're an optimist. May time prove you right.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I figure about 8 more years before we grow large enough to be courted as a group demographic.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Why I Don't Like Bernie

Well, I've finally figured out just what it is that I don't like about Bernie Sanders.

Here's the thing: I'm a storyteller. When I listen, I always listen for the underlying story.

When it comes to overarching narrative, Bernie's story is just like the Buffoon-in-Chief's. For them both, the guiding narrative is the same lying, Abrahamic story that has wreaked so much ill in the world down the centuries: Us versus Them. Black vs. White. Good Guys v. Bad Guys.

All their ideas come with an enemy attached.

The enemy may be Muslims and brown people, or it may be corporations and rich people. But they're still the Bad Guys of the old, simplistic story, and they're still out to get Us.

For all its cultural omnipresence—pick a Hollywood movie, any Hollywood movie—moral dualism is not a universal story. More importantly—to me, anyway—it is not a pagan story.

It's not that pagan stories lack conflict; it's conflict that makes a story interesting, after all. Look at the great pagan epics: the Iliad, the Táin, the Mahabharata. They're all about wars. But look more closely: Who are the good guys here, who the bad? In a pagan world, conflict arises naturally because people have differing needs and obligations, not because one is good and one is evil.

Oh, in deep ways Sanders and the Troll-in-Chief are very different, of course. One is a not-very-bright, self-serving, cynical bully; the other is intelligent, capable of compassion, and actually believes what he's saying.

That's why I'll vote for Sanders if it comes to that. Of the two, he's by far the better human being. Our only real hope, this time around, is that Democrats (and democrats) are smart enough to realize that voting against is far more important than voting for.

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I read in "The Road to Serfdom" by Friedrich A. von Hayek that centralized planning requires an enemy to justify itself, and expla

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
ONE TERM prezzy-DENT

There are three things I've learned never to discuss with people:

religion, politics, and the Great Pumpkin.


(Linus von Pelt)

 

You may remember the chant from the demos following the last presidential election here in the States:

 

NOT MY presi-DENT!

(clap-clap clap-clap-clap)

NOT MY presi-DENT!

(clap-clap clap-clap-clap)

 

As chants go, it's really pretty good: focused, succinct, a nice alternation of verbal and non-verbal, words and percussion. And it certainly beats Hey hey! Ho ho! — — has got to go!

Unfortunately, they were wrong. If you're an American, the Troll-in-Chief is your president.

But it doesn't have to stay that way.

So I'm choosing to look on that chant, not as a statement of fact, but as a prediction which we know—and may it be sooner rather than later—will eventually come true.

So, riffing off the old chant, here's the new one that I'll be chanting:

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Make Election Day a National Holiday

Election Day should be a national holiday.

This year, with its hotly-contested Midterm Elections, it certainly seemed like one, moreso than any other Election Day that I can remember. I even got an Election Day card from a friend.

And it's what the ancestors did.

In the Old Days, people from all over Ireland converged in Tara for Samhain. There they did what the Tribe always does when it gets together: they worshiped, feasted, and politicked.

Why is Election Day when it is? For the same reason that Samhain is when it is. The harvest is in, the animals are back from the summer pastures. With the work of the growing season over, there's time to get together to do the necessary work of the People before winter closes in and shuts down travel.

In this sense, I would contend that Election Day is, in effect, a latter-day descendant of Samhain.

There was no Halloween in colonial America. Halloween was a Catholic holiday, and there were few Catholics in early America. But there was Guys Fawkes' Day, the 5th of November, which replaced Halloween in post-Reformation England and inherited many of the older holiday's customs, such as bonfires. After the Revolution, Guy Fawkes' Day became a feria non grata in the United States, but Election Day took its place.

Back when, Election Day even used to be a Bonfire holiday.

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The Devil's Christianity: An Open Letter to the Evangelical Christians of America

Dear Nazzes:

During the 2016 US Presidential election, you voted overwhelmingly—against the recommendations of much of your leadership—for an immoral, lying cheat named Donald Trump.

At the apocalyptic climax of your co-religionist Chris Walley's Lamb Among the Stars novels, the Angel of the Lord explains:

Listen while I tell you the real truth....[Satan's] hope was not for the triumph of the Dominion [ = the Satanic kingdom], but for the rise of a fallen Assembly. An Assembly of hatred and malice; an Assembly of men and women...prepared to use any means and any power to win. He sought the Dark Assembly.

Note that the Greek word ekklêsía, “church,” literally means assembly. In Walley's novels, the Assembly is Christianity, the Church.

I.e. that's you he's talking about. You are the Dark Assembly. Yours is the Devil's Christianity.

So congratulations.

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  • Dragon Dancer
    Dragon Dancer says #
    HERE F*CKING HERE!

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