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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in presidential election

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
ONE TERM prezzy-DENT

There are three things I've learned never to discuss with people:

religion, politics, and the Great Pumpkin.


(Linus von Pelt)

 

You may remember the chant from the demos following the last presidential election here in the States:

 

NOT MY presi-DENT!

(clap-clap clap-clap-clap)

NOT MY presi-DENT!

(clap-clap clap-clap-clap)

 

As chants go, it's really pretty good: focused, succinct, a nice alternation of verbal and non-verbal, words and percussion. And it certainly beats Hey hey! Ho ho! — — has got to go!

Unfortunately, they were wrong. If you're an American, the Troll-in-Chief is your president.

But it doesn't have to stay that way.

So I'm choosing to look on that chant, not as a statement of fact, but as a prediction which we know—and may it be sooner rather than later—will eventually come true.

So, riffing off the old chant, here's the new one that I'll be chanting:

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Make Election Day a National Holiday

Election Day should be a national holiday.

This year, with its hotly-contested Midterm Elections, it certainly seemed like one, moreso than any other Election Day that I can remember. I even got an Election Day card from a friend.

And it's what the ancestors did.

In the Old Days, people from all over Ireland converged in Tara for Samhain. There they did what the Tribe always does when it gets together: they worshiped, feasted, and politicked.

Why is Election Day when it is? For the same reason that Samhain is when it is. The harvest is in, the animals are back from the summer pastures. With the work of the growing season over, there's time to get together to do the necessary work of the People before winter closes in and shuts down travel.

In this sense, I would contend that Election Day is, in effect, a latter-day descendant of Samhain.

There was no Halloween in colonial America. Halloween was a Catholic holiday, and there were few Catholics in early America. But there was Guys Fawkes' Day, the 5th of November, which replaced Halloween in post-Reformation England and inherited many of the older holiday's customs, such as bonfires. After the Revolution, Guy Fawkes' Day became a feria non grata in the United States, but Election Day took its place.

Back when, Election Day even used to be a Bonfire holiday.

Last modified on
The Devil's Christianity: An Open Letter to the Evangelical Christians of America

Dear Nazzes:

During the 2016 US Presidential election, you voted overwhelmingly—against the recommendations of much of your leadership—for an immoral, lying cheat named Donald Trump.

At the apocalyptic climax of your co-religionist Chris Walley's Lamb Among the Stars novels, the Angel of the Lord explains:

Listen while I tell you the real truth....[Satan's] hope was not for the triumph of the Dominion [ = the Satanic kingdom], but for the rise of a fallen Assembly. An Assembly of hatred and malice; an Assembly of men and women...prepared to use any means and any power to win. He sought the Dark Assembly.

Note that the Greek word ekklêsía, “church,” literally means assembly. In Walley's novels, the Assembly is Christianity, the Church.

I.e. that's you he's talking about. You are the Dark Assembly. Yours is the Devil's Christianity.

So congratulations.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Dragon Dancer
    Dragon Dancer says #
    HERE F*CKING HERE!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Hail to the Chief?

Abuser-in-chief

Bully-in-chief

Complainer-in-Chief

Despot-in-chief

Ego-in-chief

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • John Senesac
    John Senesac says #
    Whats wrong is people like you!We need to heal the divide in this country,and not whine about it.We are one people and we need to
  • Dragon Dancer
    Dragon Dancer says #
    HEAR FUCKING HEAR. May his reign be as short as humanly - hell, as divinely - possible. And may we manage to combat his VP who is

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Hope

Hope can be a double-edged sword. It can lift our hearts, rally us towards a cause, or it can lead us to the depths of despair when it dies. I've often wondered whether it is better to have hope or not, whether hope is a carrot dangling in front of us, or whether it is that very real need to invest our emotions into the belief that we can change our world. Back in 2012, I wrote about the Zen approach, in a piece entitled "No Hope". The words that I wrote four years ago still resonate strongly within me, even as my relationship to hope has changed.

When we are at our lowest, we might still have some hope that things will get better. This hope may be the only thing that gets us through those long, dark nights of the soul. Then again, that hope may be what is preventing us from achieving things in our own right. Hope may cause complacency. If we work without hope, without expectation, then we may be even more motivated to make a positive change in the world in our own right, for the benefit of all.

With hope comes expectation. When we have expectations, we can be thrown against the rocks of frustration, anxiety, anger and despair when those expectations are not met, when things do not go the way that we would like them to. We want people to behave the way we think they should, for the benefit of all. We want our politicians to think of the people that they represent instead of their own agendas. We want colleagues to pull their own weight, spouses and partners to be there for us, children to love us. When things don't go according to our plans, or according to our expectations, we might crash and burn. We might dive into darkness at seeing a new President-elect, we might look at the environment and realise that perhaps we have simply gone too far, and there is no remedy for what we have done. When this happens, we can lose momentum, we can get stuck. Hope might be the thing that brings us out of this stagnation, or it might leave us altogether, so that we are in an even worse state than before.

So how do we work with hope? I've found it useful in the last couple of years to work with Hope as a god. I've worked with Time in the same context, and it has been illuminating for me in so many ways. Working with the gods, we learn to create a relationship with them, one that is nurturing for all involved. There is a give and take, a sustainable and reciprocal feeling to it that means that we cannot rely on them to do everything for us, and vice versa. It is in mutual respect where we meet, where we realise that we are part of an ecosystem, and where we need to strengthen the bonds of relationship so that it functions for mutual benefit. We learn from permaculture that diversity is key, that edges are where things happen. We learn to work with both, and in doing so can make this planet a better place. If we give up Hope in this context, if we give up Hope as deity, then there will be a very real feeling of bereavement in our lives; we will be bereft. That relationship will be gone, and when it is gone then to whom do we relate?

Others would say that this might be preferable, and in giving up Hope as deity we then become more self-reliant. But self-reliance is a myth. We are all co-dependent upon everything else on this planet. We do not exist in a vacuum. We need others in order to exist, let alone thrive. We are not separate. Without the innumerable other factors in our lives, beings seen and unseen, we simply could not be. I think that this is why I believe in the gods. The gods are all about relationship, about relating to our world through a means which is personal to each and every being. This is why I'm starting to work with Hope on a new level, when it seems perhaps that all hope is lost. Otherwise, I fear I might spiral into apathy, or depression. If I work with Hope, if I talk to Her and connect those threads of sustainable relationship, then I might be inspired to solve a problem, mend something that is broken, reweave the threads of connection in the best way that I can.

Hope can be the spark of inspiration, the awen that sings to us in the dead of night when all seems lost. Hope can also be a force that keeps us from changing our lives for the better, hoping someone else, someone more powerful or intelligent will do it for us. But when we work with Hope as deity, then things begin to change. Hope will not save us from ourselves. But Hope may inspire us to do better, to be better, to be the change that we wish to see in the world.

Or so one can only Hope.

 

© Joanna van der Hoeven 2016

Joanna van der Hoeven is a Druid and author of several books, including the best-seller The Awen Alone: Walking the Path of the Solitary Druidand her most recent release, Zen for Druids: A Further Guide to Integration, Compassion and Harmony with the Natural World. Find out more at www.joannavanderhoeven.com

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Hope After the 2016 Presidential Election

If you happened across my public posts on Facebook, you'd know that I was very anti-Trump during this election cycle (no need to rehash why). However, I think it's hypocritical of Hillary supporters/Dems to take to the streets in protest, hang effigies of Trump (WTF?) and vandalize businesses.

This is the same kind of destructive and whiny energy that many demonized Trump for. And, after demonizing anti-Obama folks for saying #NotMyPresident for 8 years, it seems pretty hypocritical to now do the same to Trump. The fact is, Trump IS our President-elect. And, Hillary has called on us to have an open mind and to give him a chance to lead. As President Obama said, Trump's success is OUR success.

...
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