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Libertarians have a long history with modern NeoPaganism. In the early years of our rapid growth science fiction writer Robert Heinlein ‘s Stranger in a Strange Land,   helped inspire creating the Church of All Worlds.  and the libertarian spirit and strong female characters in his The Moon is a Harsh Mistress  was popular with many.  Historically the connection between libertarians and Pagans is deep.  Today many Pagans are libertarians and still more are sympathetic to what they imagine that philosophy to be.

On the surface that connection makes a lot of sense because libertarianism’s ethical principle is remarkably compatible with the Wiccan Rede   Libertarians generally say no one has a right to coerce a peaceful person and our rede states “An it harm none, do as ye will.”

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  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    Greybeard, I am intrigued that you never ever actually confront a single argument I make, preferring rhetoric no one can disagree
  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    A growing number of Americans, including American pagans, are Libertarian on social issues and Conservative on issues of economic
  • Chris Sherbak
    Chris Sherbak says #
    I'm not libertarian but don't many of the arguments supporting things like "just get another job" presuppose a fairly extensive (a
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Very good and well-reasoned article! I also rejected libertarianism. I despise anarchists, because in my opinion, they also champ


continued from part I.

What is wrong with libertarianism as a philosophy for Pagans?

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  • Diotima
    Diotima says #
    I've looked into libertarianism at various times in my life and found the discussions of individual rights interesting and pertine
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    Selina- Why do you ignore every actual argument I give? I do not quite know how to answer your first observation since it is ludi
  • Selina Rifkin
    Selina Rifkin says #
    Even the most cursory reading of the history of political parties shows that they often travel far from their roots. Going by your

b2ap3_thumbnail_porcupine.jpgIn thinking about how my religion informs my political choices, I realize that it only does so in the most general sense. Paganism values Nature not because there was a political movement called Environmentalism, but because our ancestors couldn’t get away from it, and because the poets and artists of the Romantic era placed Her in stark contrast to the burgeoning industrial complex.

As a movement, Environmentalism has some massive failings that I’ve written about here. Gus diZerega advocated voting Democratic in the last election, not because the Democrats were friends of the environment, but because they had a slightly better record. Hardly a ringing endorsement, and certainly not one that touches my religious sensibilities or values. And perhaps it shouldn’t. But I’ll get to that.

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  • Joseph Bloch
    Joseph Bloch says #
    Have you ever checked out "The World's Smallest Political Quiz"? http://www.theadvocates.org/quiz

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

 How might our Paganism influence our politics? A post I wrote before the election, was recently rebuked because I supposedly had no respect for nearly half the American people. Supposedly my views were alien to the Wiccan rede. I disagree as will be obvious, but my basic issue is not with the author, who I assume was sincere, but with a style of thought and the confusions it breeds.  While this post begins with a political question to answer it I will take a journey through some theology and some philosophy.

How big a tent?

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  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    There is a growing number of Americans, including many Pagan Americans who are Libertarian/conservative, who want the government o
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    As if the universe wants to back up my basic point, today I came across this connection between a prominent Tea party leader in Te
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    Mr. Bloch juts closed off discussion of his attack on this column in his blog on Witches and Pagans. The discussion over there is
  • Joseph Bloch
    Joseph Bloch says #
    You know, I think you honestly don't see in yourself the denigration, name-calling, and hypocrisy you practice when dealing with c
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    Vague charges are very easy to make, and are characteristic of the right wing. Perhaps we would have something to talk about if yo

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_MM900040941.GIFRecently I read an article by a conservative Pagan. It was a very different view point from what I hear from my community in the Northeast. The writer defined why his voting choice followed his religious principles. Since this blog is about grounding our spiritual principles into our everyday lives, I enjoyed reading how he approached that.

Certain branches of Pagan practice have been deeply influenced by the liberal Left. The Environmental and Feminist movements have been a good match for a religion that engages with Nature, and indeed, it would be fair to say that Dianic Wicca emerged from a human need to express deeply held beliefs in a group, spiritual setting. Liberal political attitudes are the norm where I live, and not just with Pagans. But as Mr. Taylor points out, there are plenty of conservative Pagans, and not only among those that practice Norse Traditions.

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  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    While the substance of these posts is valid and interesting, I'm surprised at the unnecessary crankiness. IME, dialogue is more pr
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    One final point. My blog here at W&P does make substantive points about how we should relate to our environment. I think your poi
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    There are people on the left and liberals (two different categories BTW) who dehumanize those who disagree with them, though since
  • Selina Rifkin
    Selina Rifkin says #
    "But I eat right wingers as appetizers over at dizerega.com. They lack in nutrition so do not quite qualify as a meal, but they cr
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    Context should demonstrate I am describing a point of view written after considerable irritation with your initial post. My point

Alright, so I'm writing this with a fever. If it makes a little less sense than usual, I'm sorry. Right, on we go. Last week, in a post on my own blog, I listed the mythical kings of ancient Athens. I ended that list with Codrus (Κόδρος), who ruled Athens from 1089 to 1068 BC. His son Medon was (probably) the first who ruled the city-state as archon. From that post:

During the Dorian invasion, the Oracle of Delphi prophecied that the Dorians would win, as long as the king of Athens was not harmed. Hearing of this prophecy, Codrus disguised himself as a peasant and snuck to the Dorian camp. Here, he made a fuss, and was prompty killed. The Dorians retreated upon learning what had happened. It was decreed that no one would be worthy enough to succeed Codrus on the throne, and so, Athens only had archons afterwards.

The archons did not rule as kings; where kings were sole rulers of the city state, archons ruled first in threes, then in nines, then in tens and their power did not extend to law-making. Indeed, the Athenians had a clear understanding of the difference between sovereign power and executive government, and they kept the two separate far more than any modern government.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

November 6th the right wing attempt to take over the country shattered against the sea wall of our constitution and a damaged but still viable electoral system. I think their defeat will be ranked by future historians as their high water mark. They can still do great damage to our country, but their chances to rule us have collapsed. And they know it.

This development frees us from having to play defense all the time, allowing us to ask what positive values would we like to see better achieved in modern America? 

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  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    Grownups are expected to deal with the examples if they disagree. If you are capable of making an argument this is a good place f
  • tiber
    tiber says #
    Oh sorry I didn't realize I accidentally subscribed to Art Bell's show where anyone is allowed to publish. As far as a "watermark

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