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Pagan News Beagle: Fiery Tuesday, October 10 2017

Trans people in Mexico turn to a local folk saint for patronage. Experts debunk the idea that stress doesn't affect people of color. And Costa Rica's Savegre River obtains protection from UNESCO. It's Fiery Tuesday, our segment about societal and political news from around the globe! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Pagan News Beagle: Fiery Tuesday, February 23

An ancient Hindu temple is threatened in Pakistan. PantheaCon participants discuss the ethics of hosting the convention on land formerly held by indigenous peoples. And the struggle of black women to address of mental health issues in their community is examined. It's Fiery Tuesday, our weekly segment on political and societal news from around the world. All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Pagan News Beagle: Watery Wednesday, May 27

One of the most important parts of building a community is making sure everyone has access to the necessary resources to keep them alive and comfortable. Water is perhaps the most fundamental of those. This week in Watery Wednesday we take a look at (among other things) communities around the world that are working to maintain easy access to water or those that have formed in areas where water is scarce. Continue below to find out more!

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From Those Who Have Much, Much Is Expected: A Kalasha Tale

The Kalasha are the last remaining pagans of the Hindu Kush. Numbering about 4000, in three adjoining valleys in northwest Pakistan, they are known for their proud polytheism, the freedom (and beauty) of their women, and their wine-drinking.

Among the Kalasha, November is the month of the ancestors, and it is customary to remember them—for “the spirits of the dead are pleased when their names are remembered”—by recounting tales of their deeds.

In Kalasha society, it is impingent upon the wealthy to throw elaborate feasts for as many people as possible; only by sharing their wealth with the rest of the community do they gain prestige. Their Muslim neighbors laugh at them for their lavish, spendthrift ways, but this is indeed the way of the pagan ancestors: from those who have much, much is expected.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    My understanding (I'm certainly no expert) is that the Kalasha reckon lineage bilaterally (i.e. through both the mother's and the
  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    According to Heide Goettner-Abendroth, gift giving as a method of ensuring social equality is characteristic of matriarchal egalit

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