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In my last post, I described 5 practical steps for doing dreamwork.  In this post, I want to give you a real life example of a dreamworking I did after writing the last post.

1.  Remembering my dream

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Thank you for sharing! It was very interesting.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Devotional Q&A #1

 

Last week, I promised my readers that if you sent me questions about devotional work or polytheism I would answer them to the best of my ability. Well, you haven't disappointed and I have at least a dozen or so questions (maybe more---I haven't actually counted) sitting in my inbox. They're' all good questions and thought-provoking so over the next few weeks I am going to take them one by one in the order in which they were received and answer them here (or maybe on my other blog depending on my mood). 

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Warrior Medicine

 

There is a desperation in how I fight the Filter now. I am aware of that. There didn't used to be. There was grit, determination, focus, but not vicious desperation. Over the past few months it changed, something in me changed and quite recently someone asked me what that was. It's simple really. My ancestors threw me into the direct experience of the sundering of our traditions. I stood in the flow of it and shared their experience and emotions. Then at the same time that was happening, the blogosphere erupted into a volcanic debate between polytheists and non-theistic pagans. why was this so significant to me personally? Why did it impact the place from which I fight the Filter? Because it showed me how bad off we truly are. It showed me the lay of the land and how deeply the damage went. It showed me how far we were from any coherent foundational roots. Until this past May and June, I had truly thought that more people were in ongoing devotional relationship with their Gods and dead, that more people were doing the work. My eyes have been opened.  I see well now why the Havamal warns that no man is happy who is over-wise. 

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  • Betty Prat
    Betty Prat says #
    Loved this article and I honor and appreciate the work you do, Ashe!
  • gary c. e.
    gary c. e. says #
    Hi Galina just want to say i really and deeply appreciate your posts - i may not be where your at personally but nevertheless i'm
  • Christine L Berger
    Christine L Berger says #
    Good to see you back. I had a small lesson today to cause me to realize the small daily devotions I make in the morning are more
  • Liza
    Liza says #
    I think it is important to build relationships, connects, and supports here, as well as Elsewhere. Not all humans are warriors, an
  • Byron Ballard
    Byron Ballard says #
    Welcome back. There's much to do.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

I’m going to step away from my usual blogging theme this week to share a topic that came to me while driving the two hours it took me to get to my camping destination.  (Hubby and I are on staff for a Pagan retreat here in Colorado and this was our work weekend.)  We had stopped for lunch at a place where the server recognized our t-shirts as Pagan in content.  So she proceeded to ask questions which required long answers.  Neither of us had the time.  I needed to get back on the road and she needed to help her other customers. So in hopes that it will be of service to her (I so hope she emails me!), those just starting out and those that are trying to make sense of what the broader community is, here is my viewpoint.  I am NOT trying to start up the “my way vs. your way” debate again…most of this is based on my own experiences and observances.  Your mileage, as always, may vary.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Pagan-Umbrella.gif

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  • Brian Shea
    Brian Shea says #
    And apparently, as I've found out recently, there are atheist pagans! Or non theist pagans. Who knew? There are also those who ar
  • Melia Brokaw
    Melia Brokaw says #
    It does seem odd, though for the most part I understand the wanting to be included in a community that for the most part is welcom
  • Anne Newkirk Niven
    Anne Newkirk Niven says #
    I've gotta echo Wizard on the narrowness of this one, which is interesting. Monist Goddess worshippers ("We all come from the Godd
  • Melia Brokaw
    Melia Brokaw says #
    By my understanding, monists still acknowledge more than one deity, they just honor only the one. If my understanding is incorrec
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Aj, monists believe in an ultimate divine unity, a single fount of godhood, like the sunshine behind the most beautiful stained-gl
Academic Cultural Appropriation of Neopaganism and Occultism

Author's Note: This is a reprint of an article I originally published in the Anthology: Talking About the Elephant in 2008. Because the theme of the month is on cultural appropriation I thought I'd dig it out and reprint it here. I've added a commentary on the end to show where my thoughts on this topic are now (5 years after the original article was published).

While some of the articles of this anthology [Author's note: I'm referring to Talking About the Elephant] deal with cultural appropriation issues that Neopagans and Occultists may perpetuate, the goal of my article is to provide a look at a different form of cultural appropriation currently gaining popularity in both the academic and Neopagan/Occult cultures. This cultural appropriation comes in the form of academic articles and books focused on Neopaganism and the Occult. On the surface, it would seem that scholarship on these subjects is a good thing, certain to buoy the public relationship image that both Neopaganism and Occultism have with mainstream culture. However, as I will argue, there is a different, more subtle agenda occurring in these academic works, and in a manner that can be considered cultural appropriation. Unfortunately, there is a tendency to revere academic works without coming to them with an open, but critical, awareness of how those works really represent their beliefs. Nor is the question raised by Neopagans or Occultists, if the benefits of said academic works are really good for the community, or are only good for the academic who happens to be doing the research.

 

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  • Taylor Ellwood
    Taylor Ellwood says #
    The knife does cut both ways and I'm sorry you had that experience, but imagine if you'd gone in, recorded everything and publishe
  • Amarfa
    Amarfa says #
    I tried that myself, and I got burned badly. I can't use my research at all. I wasn't allowed to record, barely able to take not
  • Amarfa
    Amarfa says #
    I have a question on this subject: Has a researcher ever encountered a Pagan population they wanted to study that has said "No" t
  • Taylor Ellwood
    Taylor Ellwood says #
    Not that I know of, per se, but by the same extension has the researcher fully briefed them on what they would be doing and/or sha
  • Amarfa
    Amarfa says #
    *I apologize for poor grammar and sentence structure in the last paragraph, I hit submit before I was actually done.*

Women all over the world are tired of being treated like third class citizens. Even in cultures that traditionally worship the divine feminine, grown women are granted fewer rights than a male infant and are punished with mutilation and death if they display personal initiative or act in accordance with nature. Three world religions blame females personally and vindictively for a mistake supposedly made by the very first woman ever created! By what logic should the ancient misjudgment of Eve be held against our mothers, wives, sisters and daughters today? This is a classic example of masculine propaganda: if we men say that women are inherently flawed, we can blame them for all of our problems. We can even make the outrageous claim that we were made in the image of God—but they were not!    

It is shocking how many women have bought into this mind manipulation, and actually believe that they are inferior. But this is not universally the case; these days many are seeking a different sort of religion that will give them equal, if complementary, status to their brothers.

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  • gary c. e.
    gary c. e. says #
    hi re: "There is an important difference between the Christian conception of Satan and the Hindu or Buddhist notion of Mara, the
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    This is so lovely, Gary! Thank you so much for sharing it. Tolkien has long been among my favorite wordsmiths, and now I see that
  • Stifyn Emrys
    Stifyn Emrys says #
    I enjoyed the article and agree wholeheartedly with your conclusion, but I don't see where the foolishness comes in. The headline
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Thank you, Stifyn - and you are absolutely right! I think it WOULD have been foolishness personified if I had presumed to supply

[Note: This is a revised version of an earlier essay that appeared on the Humanistic Paganism blog.]

"... creative imagination is the only primordial phenomenon accessible to us, the real Ground of the psyche."

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