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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Bullies and Re-membering

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  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    I pray for it and work toward it by being as kind as I know how to be--with discernment always as I am sure you do as well. My nex
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    Bullying was very common in my grade school and I was the butt of much of it as I grew up. It did make me a very strong individual
  • Joanna van der Hoeven
    Joanna van der Hoeven says #
    It can make some people stronger, and it can utterly break others, like you said. We just need a little more kindness in this worl
  • Kim Campbell
    Kim Campbell says #
    I was bullied in 7th grade. It was so difficult to be ostracized by my peers based on the rumor of a "friend". It breaks my heart
  • Joanna van der Hoeven
    Joanna van der Hoeven says #
    Technology can certainly be abused, no doubt about it. I think we have to look at healing the human spirit, so that it breaks the
Neo-pagan and vegan ways to take part in the Easter fun

Now that the Neo-pagan holiday of Ostara is behind us, the secular/Christian celebration of Easter looms ahead. I know that many of us celebrate the mainstream holiday with the rest--especially as it has become a more secular event where all kids expect an Easter basket, and probably to take part in an egg hunt.

Due to our avoidance of eggs, we vegans have to adapt this holiday a bit more than other Neo-pagans. Here is an article that I wrote up about the season, and ways vegans can join in the fun. 

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  • Rachel Seiler
    Rachel Seiler says #
    My Mom pointed me towards your blog, and I'm glad she did!
Women Are Not Props for a Man's Enlightenment

I really enjoyed watching a movie called Journey to the West: Conquering the Demons ... until its end. It's a fun, comedic takeoff on finding enlightenment and has a good message ... until its end. There it was: the gender oppression. 

The plot: two demon hunters are in love with each other, but the male refuses the woman's love because he's trying to find enlightenment and believes that there is great love and small love. When she dies, his remorse brings him to enlightenment, and he realize that there is no "great and small love."

I am sick of plots in which a woman dies in order for a man to become enlightened. Or plots in which her death gives him the apparently requisite rage to finally conquer his enemy—who, of course, killed her.

Women's lives are not props for a man's story or his victory. A woman's death should mean more than its relationship to a man. Think for a moment about the results of a woman's death constantly portrayed in films as having no importance beyond its impact on a man.

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  • Critter
    Critter says #
    This is called fridging, and I have a few links for this that might interest you: http://lby3.com/wir/ http://tvtropes.org/pmwik
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Great minds think alike. Thanks so much for your comments!
  • J'Karrah
    J'Karrah says #
    Thank you! I've been making this argument for years and unfortunately have sometimes felt like a lone voice in the wilderness. I
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Thank YOU for your supportive words, and for being willing to speak out for years despite sometimes feeling like a lone wolf. And

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Lugh Shrine

The Shrine to Lugh stands on the east side of the Stone Circle.  He is an Irish God associated with the Sun and his Shrine rests right up against the back of the Sanctuary.

 

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In the season of Imbolc, change can be scary. Especially since it's Women in Horror Month!

As we move past the Sabbat of Imbolc, we feel its energy of new beginnings. As we have learned from the recent events on the American political and social landscape, change can be both a wondrous and a terrifying thing. In either case, it galvanizes our sense of purpose and moves us down the path of our chosen desires. Whether we are promoting a change or resisting it, the energy of Imbolc calls us to action.

The bat is a wonderful totem for initiation and transformation. When these little Goth mascots come flitting out of their night time sanctuaries, they symbolize rebirth. Again, they symbolize both the beautiful and the frightening within the archetype of transformation. They tend to be stigmatized due to their habitat and their nocturnal ways. Since we associate them with creepy haunted houses and dreary caves, we see them as symbols of death. In reality, bats are important pollinators. Their control of insects like mosquitoes also protects us from disease. I will go into the bat in more detail in an upcoming issue (probably issue 92) of SageWoman. For now, let's suffice it to say that the bat is a really good representation of the scary side of change.

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Control Freaks, Perfectionists, and Micromanagers Part 2

 

This is part 2 of a series on Pagan leadership and control freaks, perfectionists, and micromanagers. Read Part 1 here.

Ego Wounds

And that takes us back to the root issues here. It's not bad to be a visionary, to be an abstract thinker. But when you add in ego wounds of poor self esteem, lack of self confidence, or other related issues, what you often get is a perfectionist control freak, or a know-it-all. Or both.

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Control Freaks, Perfectionists, and Micromanagers

 

There's a whole overlapping suite of behaviors that are found in a lot of grassroots leaders. There's the combination of being a perfectionist, a control freak, and a micromanager. All too often, folks also engage in the know-it-all behavior pattern as well.

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