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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Old Gods

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Witches Have Always Been Different

Even back in pagan days, witches were different.

They lived in cities and ran things, like government and armies.

We lived in the sticks and tried to raise enough to get us through the winter.

They worshiped Younger Gods, the ones with human faces.

We still worshiped the Old Gods, the untamed powers, the wild.

They went to temples to pray.

We went to the woods to dance.

Their priests wore white linen.

Ours—if anything at all—wore black, and probably wool.

Their gods had beautiful statues.

Ours had trees and standing stones, the woman in white clay, the man with horns.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    It's the pagan way.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    So some us remembered Acteon as the God of the hunt before Artemis came along. Some of us would have worshipped Hermaphroditus as

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
How Do You Know When a God Is a God?

Every pagan knows that there are gods walking among us: seen, unseen, and (most often of all, I suspect), seen but unrecognized.

So how do you tell when that radiantly beautiful guy across the street, or the old woman that just happened to whisper exactly the right thing in your ear, is one of us or one of...Them?

According to the sages of India, there are three things to look for.

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  • Murphy Pizza
    Murphy Pizza says #
    Its true about Jesus of Nazareth (we.were.forced to watch it every Lent); Powell has these remarkable icy blue eyes, and not once

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Any Day of the Moon

A Qabalist was explaining to me the mysteries of the Christian Qabalá.

I can't remember whether or not she knew that I speak Hebrew.

So, here's how it works. You start off with YHVH, yod-he-vav-he, “Yahvéh,” the secret name of El, the Canaanite High God.

Into this, you insert the letter Sh, shin, one of the Three Mother Letters (whatever that means).

And voilà: YHShVH, “Yehoshuah”: Jesus.

Pretty nifty, eh?

“But that's not how you spell 'Jesus' in Hebrew,” I objected.

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An Older, Realer Paganism: The Life and Times of a Saami Shaman-Poet

 the guests had one month fewer

they do not speak the language of nature

 

We take ancient gods and goddesses, revive them, and think that that's paganism.

But that's not paganism; it's a cartoon, a caricature, of paganism.

For an older, realer paganism, read the work of Saami poet Nils-Alsak Valkeapää (1943-2001).

Here there's a life lived so thoroughly among the old gods—the Sun our father, Earth mother of life, the Moon, the Winds, the Lake, the Mountain, the Reindeer—that there's no space between: a living relationship with a living world.

Listen to his shaman's song:

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Nectar of the Gods

Woe, I cry, woe: five long years, and never a good tomato.

Either it got too hot, and the tomatoes languished.

Or it didn't get hot enough, and they never ripened.

We didn't have enough rain, and so they were tough-skinned and bitter.

Or we had too much rain, and they swelled up obese and flavorless, red water balloons.

Oh, but this year: this year the gods have been good.

Earth and Your two boon husbands, Sun and Thunder: thank You, thank You All.

Firm, sweet, kissed by the Sun: at every meal tomatoes, and you never get tired of them.

Glory to the gift of the Aztecs, best of Nightshades! But in every good tomato year, you always reach glut: the point at which they're coming in so fast that you can't keep up, no matter how many you eat.

That means that it's time for the Nectar of the Gods.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Stand aside, avocado toast. You're hopelessly outclassed.
  • Murphy Pizza
    Murphy Pizza says #
    Need someone to unload tomatoes on? Tomato toast for breakfast now. Just sayin '.
A Midsummer Invocation to Earth and Her Two Husbands

Midsummer dark, Midsummer bright:

the longest day, the shortest night.

 

(Horn)

Let us lift up our hands.

 

On this Midsummer's Eve we call

to Earth, mighty mother of us all,

and we praise you for your great good gift of fruitfulness.

We ask that through the summer to come

our gardens may bear abundantly,

so that through this season

and through the winter to come

we, your people, may have plenty to eat.

So mote it be.

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What Do You Swear On When You Take a Public Oath?

You're giving testimony in court, or maybe you're assuming public office.

In both cases, it's customary to swear on a holy object.

So, Pagan: on what do you swear?

Strike me dead if I'd swear on one of their accursed books.

Strike me dead if I'd swear on a book at all.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Makes sense: who is as stable or trustworthy as Earth? And, of course, she knows everything.
  • The Cunning Wife
    The Cunning Wife says #
    Traditionally, Slavic people would take a lump of earth in hand while making an oath and then eat it. I like it.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I once read that the ancient Egyptians took their oaths on an onion. Something about those concentric rings in an onion. I like
  • Ian Phanes
    Ian Phanes says #
    I've thought that an altar pentacle could work for a witch.

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