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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Moon Goddess

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Moon Bowl

The Moon-horns low as the full Moon clears the cattail thicket at lake's edge.

From among the standing reeds, three women emerge, arms around waists.

Their white skirts are identical, but their breasts are bare: the high breasts of youth, the round breasts of maturity, the long breasts of age.

The Young and the Old raise their outer arms.

Between them, She of the Round Breasts bears a silver bowl.

She speaks.

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Follow the Moon

I'm usually no partisan of bumper-sticker theology.

Between the smug (“My Goddess gave birth to your god”), the derivative (“I work for a Norse electrician”), and the just plain delusional (“Nobody ever started a war in the name of Wicca”), I mostly don't see the point.

Until I saw this one. It's poetic. It's evocative.

Profound, even.

A row of nine Moons, waning, full, and waxing. Beneath them:

Follow the Moon.

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NASA Confirms Gift of Moon Rock to Minneapolis Pagan Temple

AP: Houston

NASA confirmed today that the US space agency has agreed to donate one of its Moon rocks to a pagan temple in Minneapolis.

"To some, these rocks hold profound spiritual, as well as scientific, significance," said a NASA representative who spoke on condition of anonymity. "Moon worship is one of humanity's oldest religions, and we are proud to make this gift."

Founded in 1980, the Temple of the Moon, the designated recipient of the Moon rock, is the oldest continuously-operating pagan temple in the Twin Cities area, commonly known as "Paganistan" because of its large pagan population.

According to Steven Posch, the temple's priest-in-residence, "Without the Moon's influence on Earth's tides, life literally would not exist on this planet. Small wonder that our ancestors revered the Moon, as we still do today. Now this relic of our goddess can be properly reverenced, as it so richly deserves."

The rock in question, a brescia from the Mare Fecundatatis, was gathered during the Apollo 13 expedition to the Moon in 1970.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Maybe it's time for a Paganistan Aeronautics and Space Administration. PASA, anyone?
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    You're right on both counts, Jon, and kudos for your close reading. Alas, "fake" news doesn't have to be true, only believable.
  • Jön Upsal's Gardener
    Jön Upsal's Gardener says #
    More's the pity. I'm a huge fan and supporter of space exploration. Good on you for the verisimilitude. What I wouldn't give for
  • Jön Upsal's Gardener
    Jön Upsal's Gardener says #
    The Soviet Luna 16 probe brought back some samples from Mare Fecunditatis in 1970, but I don't see how NASA would have ended up wi
  • Jön Upsal's Gardener
    Jön Upsal's Gardener says #
    Apollo 13 never landed on the moon. How could they have gathered any moon rocks?

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Postcard from Micklegard

To Oswin King of the Hwicce, from his brother Osred: Greetings!

Well brother, Micklegard is a fine town, and no mistake. No matter what (or who) you want to buy, eat, or screw, they've got it here. Strong ale for the likes of this honest Hwiccan lad. 

Check out this dome. It's the city's chief temple. They worship the Moon here, just like we do back home—she's the city's patron goddess, in fact—only they call her Hekate. This is her temple as Lady of Wisdom. (Sound familiar?) Quite a sight, though I still can't figure why they go in under a roof to worship the Moon. Strange folk, Greeks.

Turns out that wandering gleeman was telling the truth after all: the High King here really does keep a special war-band of Westerners as body-guards. He calls it his "barbarian guard." Funny: he can't trust his own to protect him, yet we're the barbarians!

Thought maybe I'd give it a try, though. Fighting's fighting, wherever you go. I hear the pay's good, and like I said: You want it, they've got it.

My love to mother and the girls. Wine's fine, but what I wouldn't give right now for a beaker of good, honest Hwiccan ale.

Be hale, drink hale, brother.

More soon.

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
It's the Full Moon, Charlie Brown

"Augh!"

With his hands on his head, Charlie Brown groaned.

"Isn't there anyone who knows what witchcraft is all about?"

In the silence that followed, it was Linus that spoke.

"Sure, Charlie Brown. I can tell you what witchcraft is all about."

He walked to the center of the stage. "Lights, please?"

The lights in the auditorium dimmed. From the spotlight's magic circle, he spoke.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Mab Nahash
    Mab Nahash says #
    Don't you think it's awfully reductionist to conflate gods with gendered approaches to magic?
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    You really don't believe in asking the small questions, do you? For now, let me say that I think we'll find much to say on the que
  • Chris Moore
    Chris Moore says #
    Compare the magic of the Moon to that of the Horns?

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Moon by Day

I ran into the goddess yesterday. At the farmers' market, no less.

You know how it feels when you suddenly see the face of a friend in an unexpected place? The surprise, the delight?

That's just what it was like.

Heading back to the car with my bags of baby beets, new peas, and the season's first daikons, I looked up and lo! there she was, low in the southwestern sky.

The Moon, approaching her setting, now in the 21st day of her lunation: sun-washed and pale as a cloud.

But no cloud she. Oh no.

The Moon surprises us. We think of her as Lady of Night, but the night cannot contain her. She wanders at will wheresoever she please, ruled by her own inner life. The all-seeing Sun sees what is done by day, but the wandering Moon knows the secrets of both day and night.

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Wayward Daughter

Dion Fortune was wrong.

Not all goddesses are one goddess.

There's Earth, Mother of all Life. She and her family—Sun, Thunder, Fire, the Winds, the plants, the animals—live out our lives together. Her story—our story—is what we call the Wheel of the Year.

And then there's the Moon.

Moon is the wayward daughter, the child who goes off and has a life of her own.

She has her own cycles, but they're not synched with those of everyone else. She has her own changes, powerful and independent. She's still Earth's daughter, part of the great family of the gods, and part of the life of that family, but very much on her own terms.

There in her sky (L. M. Boston) she wheels, independent of Earth's cycles, wandering the horizon in her Great Cycle as she will: ours but always her own.

That's why we worship her.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Anna
    Anna says #
    Thanks for this story. It will stay with me.

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