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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Moon Goddess

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Postcard from Micklegard

To Oswin King of the Hwicce, from his brother Osred: Greetings!

Well brother, Micklegard is a fine town, and no mistake. No matter what (or who) you want to buy, eat, or screw, they've got it here. Strong ale for the likes of this honest Hwiccan lad. 

Check out this dome. It's the city's chief temple. They worship the Moon here, just like we do back home—she's the city's patron goddess, in fact—only they call her Hekate. This is her temple as Lady of Wisdom. (Sound familiar?) Quite a sight, but I still can't figure why they go in under a roof to worship the Moon. Strange folk, Greeks.

Turns out that wandering gleeman was right after all: the High King here really does keep a special war-band of Westerners as body-guards. He calls it his "barbarian guard." Funny: he can't trust his own to protect him, yet we're the barbarians!

Thought maybe I'd give it a try, though. Fighting's fighting, wherever you go. I hear the pay's good, and like I said: You want it, they've got it.

My love to mother and the girls. Wine's fine, but what I wouldn't give right now for a beaker of good, honest Hwiccan ale.

Be hale, drink hale, brother.

More soon.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
It's the Full Moon, Charlie Brown

"Augh!"

With his hands on his head, Charlie Brown groaned.

"Isn't there anyone who knows what witchcraft is all about?"

In the silence that followed, it was Linus that spoke.

"Sure, Charlie Brown. I can tell you what witchcraft is all about."

He walked to the center of the stage. "Lights, please?"

The lights in the auditorium dimmed. From the spotlight's magic circle, he spoke.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Mab Nahash
    Mab Nahash says #
    Don't you think it's awfully reductionist to conflate gods with gendered approaches to magic?
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    You really don't believe in asking the small questions, do you? For now, let me say that I think we'll find much to say on the que
  • Chris Moore
    Chris Moore says #
    Compare the magic of the Moon to that of the Horns?

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Moon by Day

I ran into the goddess yesterday. At the farmers' market, no less.

You know how it feels when you suddenly see the face of a friend in an unexpected place? The surprise, the delight?

That's just what it was like.

Heading back to the car with my bags of baby beets, new peas, and the season's first daikons, I looked up and lo! there she was, low in the southwestern sky.

The Moon, approaching her setting, now in the 21st day of her lunation: sun-washed and pale as a cloud.

But no cloud she. Oh no.

The Moon surprises us. We think of her as Lady of Night, but the night cannot contain her. She wanders at will wheresoever she please, ruled by her own inner life. The all-seeing Sun sees what is done by day, but the wandering Moon knows the secrets of both day and night.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Wayward Daughter

Dion Fortune was wrong.

Not all goddesses are one goddess.

There's Earth, Mother of all Life. She and her family—Sun, Thunder, Fire, the Winds, the plants, the animals—live out our lives together. Her story—our story—is what we call the Wheel of the Year.

And then there's the Moon.

Moon is the wayward daughter, the child who goes off and has a life of her own.

She has her own cycles, but they're not synched with those of everyone else. She has her own changes, powerful and independent. She's still Earth's daughter, part of the great family of the gods, and part of the life of that family, but very much on her own terms.

There in her sky (L. M. Boston) she wheels, independent of Earth's cycles, wandering the horizon in her Great Cycle as she will: ours but always her own.

That's why we worship her.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Anna
    Anna says #
    Thanks for this story. It will stay with me.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Lady Free

Ye shall be free from slavery.

Witchcraft begins with a slave revolt.

 

C. G. Leland tells the story in his 1899 Aradia: Gospel of the Witches.

 

In those days there were on earth many poor and many rich.

The rich made slaves of all the poor....many slaves escaped. They fled to the country....[I]nstead of sleeping by night, they plotted escape and robbed their masters, and then slew them. So they dwelt in the mountains and forests as robbers and assassins, all to avoid slavery.

 

The Moon, as all-seeing Lady of the Night, witnesses her people's troubles and, in her mighty ruth (mercy), she sends her daughter Aradia to teach them magic and herbcraft, so that they can hex and poison their oppressors.

 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Tale of a Triple Goddess

They say that in ages of ages, Earth gave birth to Moon, her first-born daughter and other self.

The size-ratio of our planet to its moon is anomalous in the solar system. In many ways, the two look more like a binary planet than a planet and moon.

In Moon, it is said, we behold Earth's knowledge of self.

It is believed that the moon accreted from material expelled from what is now the Pacific Ocean, perhaps as the result of impact, some 4.5 billion years ago.

She then gave birth to Sea, it is said: Earth's daughter and other self, born of her longing for Moon, and imprint of her love for self and daughter.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
She of the White Track

What does it smell like, the Milky Way?

Well, I think I know.

Walking down the sidewalk, unaccountably, I find myself thinking of honey. Then it surfaces, a sweetness almost subliminal. I stop and consciously immerse myself in breath. It's June, and the clover is blooming.

White clover. Trefoil (“three-leaf”). Trifolium repens (“creeping”). That's Anglo-Saxon, French, and Latin, respectively.

Moon clover, Moon honey.

Shamrock's the Irish. (Seamrog, diminutive of seamar, “clover.”) Saint who? Pfft, nonsense. It's Hers, all the way. Waxing, Full, and Waning: Three. (During the Dark, there is no Moon. Then again, maybe that's what makes that fourth leaf special.)

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