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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in light and darkness

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Hello, Darkness!

Darkness and Awakening. These are, in my personal estimation and temperature taking of the zeitgeist,  the two great themes of 2017. Whether you look at the year from a macro or micro view, take it personally or put a more universal perspective to your lens, these are the recurring motifs.  Even the 2017 Word of the Year that has been identified is complicit. It speaks both of a knowing darkness and a guilty glimmer of self-insight. We ask ourselves these days if we are 'Woke.' That implies awakening from, perhaps a dream or very deep slumber. Some people awake with a jolt. Others emerge slowly in a fug of confusion. But awakening eventually happens, even in the darkness of a December morning.

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Working with Shadow Animals: terms: darkness and the Shadow Archetype

The term “shadow” has many connotations, depending on its use. When working with your “Shadow Animal,” you will probably want to explore what type of shadow the animal is. That will determine how you work with Them. I will define the terms: “darkness and light,” “the shadow archetype,” “nahualli,” “heyoka,” “trickster,” and “shaman’s death” in several blog postings. Finally, I will conclude with how to work your “Shadow Animals.”

Darkness and Light

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

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Since I’ve been researching what darkness means—what it means to dive into dark depths and exploring those hidden places of spirituality and human-ness that are so unnerving they are considered mythic, I was fascinated to learn recently about something quite human and relatively normal: the pineal gland. This gland, which I vaguely remember from high school biology as being a fingernail-sized gland above the brain stem, is also called "the third eye” and is associated with telepathy and the seat of the soul. It is considered the place from which we see the brightness of our futures and recognize our potential from the darkness of uncertainty. But I was surprised to learn that the pineal gland actually has photoreceptive rods and cones just like the retina of the eyes. The pineal gland, tucked deep into the folds of the brain and nowhere near the eyes, is what allows us to perceive, while asleep, whether it is day or night, and it makes me wonder: How do we perceive dark—the real Dark, with a capital D?

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
The Golden Thread

“Open the door”, said the wise woman
“Come in and sit down.

For it is she of great worth
Who wears the King’s crown”.

I looked at the wizened face
For answers that long I had sought
Deep pools of star-filled eyes returned my gaze
And told of mysteries carefully taught.

Her countenance was hypnotic
And fingers deftly moved to and fro
Her body moving in rhythm
As the web from the spinning did grow.

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Solstice Comes But Once A Year, Now It’s Here! by Carol P. Christ

Actually it comes twice, once in midsummer, the longest day of the year, and once in midwinter, the longest night.  Winter Solstice is also known as the first day of winter.

For those of us attuned to the cycles of Mother Earth, Winter Solstice is a time to celebrate the dark and the transformations that come in the dark. Many of the customs associated with Christmas and Hannukah, including candles, Yule logs, and trees decorated with lights were originally associated with Winter Solstice.  The extra pounds put on during winter feasting were insulation against the cold winter nights.

Those who fear that many of the customs of the Christmas season might be pagan are right.  As we learn again to honor our place within the cycles of birth, death, and regeneration, we return these customs to their roots in the circle of life.

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  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Wonderful post - I'm looking forward to celebrating the return of the dark at Summer Solstice!

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