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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

As some of you know, I’m not afraid to talk about cursework to college students. Everyone likes talking about cursework. It’s exciting, it’s sexy and it shows that you’re not afraid to get all honey badger on someone’s ass.

I maintain that it’s not a great idea to talk about personal cursework/occult fight club publicly but it’s a good idea to know a bit about cursework in my opinion.

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Honey pots are used traditionally in Hoodoo to bring money to you and also to potentially sweeten someone towards you (such as an ex you’re trying to win back, your boss, a new love interest, the judge in a court case). I find honey pots to be an inexpensive “slow and steady” way to keep generating income.
 
I started to say you don’t need a strong background in Hoodoo to use a honey jar, but like all magical practices that depends on what you’re going to do with it. If you want to use it to draw money, that’s pretty basic and can be done by just about anyone. If you’re starting to get into sweetening specific people toward you (i.e. using it as an influencing tool) and potentially bending them to your will. . .Well, you better know what you’re doing, champ, because I’m sure as hell not going to help you out of a mess (and honey,that kind of work is called a messfor a reason). I am not at all opposed to using a honey jar for that purpose, but you need to really be able to assess your magical prowess accurately so that you know if you can really handle any kind of fallout that may come from your working (again, like with any other working) should it go wrong (and in some cases, should it go right!).
 
How to Make a Honey Jar to Attract Income
 
Ingredients:
 
A small hinged-lidded glass jar
 
Honey (you can use other sweetners, dare I say even sweetners like Equal or Splenda but I always use honey, preferably local)
 
A pinch of Irish Moss (steady flow of money)
 
A pinch of Chamomile (to hold onto your money)
 
A pinch of Cinnamon (to attract money quickly, it’s a “heating” herb)
 
Small green taper candles
 
Money drawing oil
 
A small piece of paper bag
 
A pen
 
A pin
 
Matches (or a gas stove)
 
1. Write out your petition on your piece of paper bag. Write what you’re trying to draw to you (a new job, a raise, job security, a second income stream, paid artistic gigs, etc.) but make sure your pen doesn’t leave the page. Neatness doesn’t count here, continuity does. Fold it up tightly towards you (to bring the money towards you).
 
2. Put the petition paper in the jar. Put the herbs in the jar. Pour honey over the herbs and paper until your jar is full. Seal the jar.
 
3. Pray over your jar. Psalms are typically recommended, if that’s your bag rock out. If not figure out what is. (I usually pray/enchant/put my will into it and end it with “Please do this in the name of God Herself.”)
 
4. Etch into your candle your intent. It can be words, symbols, runes, again, whatever’s your bag. Dress your candle by putting a little bit of oil on it and rub the oil into the candle *towards* you.

5. If fire scares you, make sure your sink is cleared for this part. Put the honey jar into your cauldron or sink and light the candle. Melt a few drops onto the lid of your jar. Stick the candle onto the melted wax on top of your jar. I find it best to let it burn out in one go which is why I recommend small candles.
 
7. If you’re on the ball, repeat steps 3-5 weekly. If you’re a slag like myself, monthly has sufficed so far.

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  • Rlekha
    Rlekha says #
    Hello, I researched information out there and did create a finance honey jar. However, I followed instructions that did not incl

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Hearth Witchery

It has come as a surprise to me, considering my relationship with Odin (the  Wanderer and hedge-crosser extraordinaire), but I have been discovering lately that I am far more of a hearth witch than a hedge witch.  Don't get me wrong; I do love wandering through the dark woods at night, threading my way through cemeteries, or exploring the Eugene wetlands.  I love to explore these liminal places in a light trance state, letting the already-fragile boundaries between the worlds blur so that I can commune with the spirits there.  This is part of my practice, and it always will be.  (And in the case of the wetlands, I do this every morning on my walk to work, in the early hours when the human world is still barely stirring but the land wights--or land spirits--are awake and going about their day.) But at the heart of my practice, I am a Doorway for my gods and spirits, and to fulfill that function I must be anchored in this world, even as I work at blurring its edges.  

I just had an entire week off from my day job, for the first time in years, and found myself spending much of it at my spinning wheel, or gathering supplies to make prayer beads, or in my kitchen learning to make salted caramels, or planning what I will need to begin producing candles and other non-yarn goodies for my Etsy shop.   When given a choice between wandering outdoors and busying myself with activities at home, I nearly always choose the latter.  Perhaps my physical condition pays a part in this (I have moderate to severe fibromyalgia, and at this point I still work full time so that saps a lot of my energy), but most of the time I find that I would rather be at home, tending a hearth for my gods and for the spirits I honor, rather than out in the world.  My trips out in the world fortify and help to shape my hearth; they feed it and strengthen my center.  In this I am like Frigga, who puts Her apron aside and rides with Her Husband in the Hunt during the dark half of the year, but the rest of the time concentrates Her efforts on creating a welcoming home for Him to return to after His wanderings.

To get back to the topic of setting up a hearth in your own home if you do not already have one, despite my previous definition of the hearth as a place of fire, there is always the option of interpreting "fire" symbolically.  Along these lines, your hearth can be that place that anchors and nourishes your home, that feeds what you love most about it, the "flame" that makes your home a welcoming place.  For some people, it would clearly be the kitchen table where the family gathers for dinner to share stories of their day.  For some, it might be a place of literal fire, such as the woodburning stove (and do I ever wish I had one!) where herbal oils and brews are prepared.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

So before we get too glue gun intensive, it occurred to me that you don't know me very well yet.  

Things You Need to Know (in no particular order):

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Beth Wodandis
    Beth Wodandis says #
    I'm looking forward to your book! Like you, I'm also thinking of starting a second Etsy store for the "Crafty" things I'd like to
  • Joseph Bloch
    Joseph Bloch says #
    Welcome from a fellow Pagansquare blogger and Jerseyite!

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