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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in kemeticism

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Latria: They want your soul [pt.I]

Religion is always a choice. There are people raised in particular religions (or lack of them) since childhood, and it’s very natural for them to accept the beliefs of their parents/family as part of their cultural identity- something that isn’t questioned. But as the kid becomes a teen and then an adult – there are points of maturation – there are moments when religion then becomes a choice, when one reaches a point where you can accept a religion whole-heartedly (either self-chosen, or in keeping with one’s cultural surroundings and expectations).
And this is always a personal mystery and a turning point for a believer.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Why kemeticism?

My personal spiritual journey started, when I was 12 years old.

There are people who were raised in religion, and the idea that God exists is therefore very natural for them.

But I was raised in soviet-style secular atheism. I had read a lot of things about religions, but the default mindset ingrained from childhood, was that “religion is a human invention, and an instrument of oppression and control. Gods are just mythology.”

When I was 15, I joined Russian Orthodox Church (mostly because I was baptized there when I was a kid and it seemed like a natural decision), but left it in 2005 to become Roman Catholic. However, the existence of the Gods of Egypt (Netjeru) was shown to me in obvious experience - and now I’m trying to live with it.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Hermopolis Begins in the Heart

“If anyone wishes to be sure
in the road they tread,
they must close their eyes
and walk in the Dark”
--- st. Juan de la Cruz

The old man, wearing a long gray galabiyah and white turban on his head, one with a skin color of a dark coffee, the man with incredibly kind eyes, bright and full of knowledge and wisdom, looked at me and touched my hand again. “My daughter,” – he repeated with kind, but quite demanding voice, “follow me, let me show you how to pray. Many people come here for prayer. I see that you came for prayer. Let me show you what they do.”

He was a guardian in the temple of Medinet-Habu, working there for more than 30 years, and probably living there under the hot skies of Egypt, day by day seeing tourist groups and individual visitors in the temple, he gained the wisdom to tell, who is coming “as a tourist” just to glare at the magnificent ruins and take pictures, and who is coming for prayer and devotion.

I wondered if the words “I came here for prayer” were written right on my forehead. But I had been wearing my ceremonial garment, long white ancient Egyptian style dress and wide necklace. And while other people in the temple did not really care, probably thinking that I was just cosplaying Nefertari or Cleopatra or another Egyptian Queen, it was not a cosplay.

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Before it went out of business I saw book entitled "Jesus: last of the Pharaohs" at Borders Books and Tapes. I didn't get a copy
  • Tatiana Matveeva
    Tatiana Matveeva says #
    I have heard about Hathor sanctuary on Sinai, but never thought about Hathor as possible name of Asherah. But I don't think this a

b2ap3_thumbnail_egyptianmyth.jpg

 

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  • Rebecca Buchanan
    Rebecca Buchanan says #
    @Ife: Oh, that's terrific! I can't wait to see it.
  • Ife
    Ife says #
    Great news! I contacted the author and she said that she is working on a Treasury of Norse Mythology. She also loved my idea on Ja

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_jackal.jpg

A few months back, I recommended a few of my favorite Pagan- and polytheist-friendly romances. They covered a variety of sub genres, from urban fantasy romances to science fiction romances. I am pleased to report that I have discovered two more books which should interest Pagan romance readers out there, especially Kemetics.

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  • Rebecca Buchanan
    Rebecca Buchanan says #
    Totally agree. I can spin a good magical realism yarn, but my attempts at romance are drivel. Oh, well. If you have any Pagan ro
  • Heather Freysdottir
    Heather Freysdottir says #
    I am so tickled to see someone else who enjoys Pagan romance! I got started writing with Loki as my Muse in romantic fiction, and

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

It could be argued that there is no more famous Goddess in modern Paganism than Isis. Her figure -- often winged, with ankh in hand or perhaps an infant Horus, usually crowned by a sun and horns -- is immediately recognizable. 

Such was the case in much of the ancient Western world, as well. Known as Au Set or Aset in Egypt, her myths and worship spread across northern Africa, deep into the Middle East, throughout Europe, and as far north as Roman Britain. The memory of her survived even into the Christian Middle Ages. With the (re)birth of Paganism, songs and hymns are once again being raised in her honor; Wiccans, solitary Pagans, Goddess Spiritualists, Kemetics and many others praise her as the Queen of Heaven, the Throne of Creation, the Great Magician, the Mother of Mothers, the Rose of Eternal Life.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Rebecca Buchanan
    Rebecca Buchanan says #
    @Isidora: I'm so glad to hear that "Isis Magic" is back in print. And I'm glad to hear that you've been enjoying the devotionals
  • Isidora Forrest
    Isidora Forrest says #
    Thanks for the mention, Caity! Isis Magic had been out of print for several years...but happily, it is now back in print in a 10t
  • Rebecca Buchanan
    Rebecca Buchanan says #
    Caity: thanks for the suggestion!
  • Caity
    Caity says #
    I really enjoyed "Isis Magic: Cultivating a Relationship with the Goddess of 10,000 Names" by M Isidora Forrest, which falls into

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