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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in jung

In my last post, I described 5 practical steps for doing dreamwork.  In this post, I want to give you a real life example of a dreamworking I did after writing the last post.

1.  Remembering my dream

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Thank you for sharing! It was very interesting.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_jacobs-ladder-blake-heartcurrents.jpg

"Jacob's Ladder" by William Blake

In my last post, I discussed dreamwork as a form of Jungian Pagan spiritual practice.  In this post, I want to offer some practical advice for turning dreaming into a spiritual practice.  The following comes from Anthony Stevens' Private Myths: Dreams and Dreaming and Robert Johnson's Inner Work: Using Dreams and Active Imagination for Inner Growth.

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  • Áine
    Áine says #
    Thanks for this, John! I always remember at least one dream from every night, and I sort of fall back into the dream I left as I f
  • John Halstead
    John Halstead says #
    Thanks Áine. It's good to know others are getting something out it.
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Great stuff! I always appreciate your perspective. I've had a few "big dreams", as I'm sure that many (if not most) of us have. V
  • John Halstead
    John Halstead says #
    Thanks Jamie.

When I comprehended my darkness, a truly magnificent night

came over me and my dream plunged me into the depths of the

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  • Laura Smith
    Laura Smith says #
    Great posting. I am a follower of Jung and Campbell in my practice as an Archetypal Dreamwork Analyst. I also blog about my own pe
  • John Halstead
    John Halstead says #
    Thanks Laura. I'll definitely come over and check out your work.
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Very interesting food for thought. Thanks again for sharing it with us!

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

[Note: This is a revised version of an earlier essay that appeared on the Humanistic Paganism blog.]

A couple of posts ago, I wrote about ritual creation as a form of Jungian Pagan spiritual practice.  I described ritual as a kind of dance between the conscious and unconscious, in which the conscious mind gives form to unconscious energy or potentialities.  Jung often used the metaphor of water to describe the vivifying energies of the unconscious.  This water, wrote Jung, “comes from deep down in the mountain [the unconscious] and runs along secret ways before it reaches daylight [consciousness].”  The place where it springs forth is marked by a symbol.  This symbol merely marks the experience of the archetype, and it should not be confused with the experience (the water) itself or the archetype (the source of the water).

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[Note: This is a revised version of an earlier essay that appeared on the Humanistic Paganism blog.]

"... creative imagination is the only primordial phenomenon accessible to us, the real Ground of the psyche."

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What does a Jungian Pagan spiritual practice look like?  So far, on this blog, my writing has been highly abstract.  I'd like to get does to the practical side of things now.

A Jungian spiritual practice may take many forms.  What all of these forms have in common is that they bring together the rational conscious mind with the non-rational unconscious mind.  Dreamwork, for example, is not just dreaming, but upon waking, analyzing the dream and integrating the unconscious contents into one's conscious life. 

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  • Amarfa
    Amarfa says #
    I'll have to find my other resources. I wonder if it was one of Aidan Kelly's books that I found it in. I also have somewhere a
  • John Halstead
    John Halstead says #
    Thanks. Please do let me know what you turn up. John
  • Elspeth
    Elspeth says #
    Thank you - very clear, instructive article - so useful. You take great care to state that active imagination is different to luci
  • John Halstead
    John Halstead says #
    I have only done journeying once. I would think that with an effective guide, one who led you to your unconscious rather than pro
  • Elspeth
    Elspeth says #
    Thanks for putting this succinctly ie good journeying is being led into one's unconscious but most related exercises involve proje

When I first started getting into Jung, I was lost.  I quickly discovered three things: First, Jung wrote a lotThere are 18 volumes of his Collected Works (not counting the bibliography and index) and they are not even complete.  Second, there is very little logic to the ordering of Jung's writings.  This is why electronic versions of Jung's writings are great: because they are searchable.  And third, electronic versions of many of Jung's writings are very hard to find.  I've previously provided a list of Internet Jung resources here along with a link to a torrent download of Jung's Collected Works

Jung's Collected Works

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