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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Hermes

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Soul, ignited with your light

The last year was very happy one for me, and full of wonderful travels, meetings with new friends, and blessings were poured like rain.
I really hope that the coming year will be also fulfilling and peaceful; and "let the God/s you honor, will send you everything you wish for, and gives their blessings to your friends, families, children and neighbors"...
For my first post in 2016, I want to share some of my devotional poetry again - written in honor of Thoth-Hermes-Djehuty.

I have my soul
ignited with your light…

*

when I whisper the words of love
I feel your wings
around, protecting me;
when I speak your praises -
it’s the only reason to know how to speak,
when I live for you -
it’s the only reason to remember again,
how to breathe…

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
The Actor's Life

Our giant new television came with high definition. While my husband marvelled at the crispness of the picture and the exciting quality of the sports events, I noticed something else. 

 

The illusion of reality had disappeared.

 

 

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  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Dear Archer: I really love this post. I, too, saw the makeup on the actors' faces when we got our HD TV. This was especially sig
  • Archer
    Archer says #
    Wow, Ted what an interesting life you've led! I'm intrigued by your theory that we honour actors because an intuition that we wear

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Can I Get a Witness?

 

 

One of my yoga students approached me after class. She wanted to discuss a scene from a book I’d leant her.

 

“You know how the author is teaching a yoga class, and one of his students breaks down crying and he cradles her head in his hands and acts as her witness? And then he shows her how to be her own witness?”

 

I nodded.

 

“Well I was wondering if you could that for me?”

 

Sure. No problem.

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  • Archer
    Archer says #
    It's amazing to me how much we can pull out of our stories--about Buddha, Jesus, Odin, whomever. I marvel at how powerful the stor
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    You're welcome, as always. Fortunately I read your first reply, so I appreciate the "in"-sights you shared; I also understand why
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Thank you, Archer, for another excellent article. I know exactly what you mean about long distance witnessing. I'm not familiar wi
  • Archer
    Archer says #
    Thanks for some thoughtful points and kind words Ted.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Home Fire

Home. We don't really know how we feel about it. We may reject the place that raised us and seek to escape its troubling pull. Or we may long for an idealized home and set out to find it. But home is something you can neither escape nor find in its perfection. Rather, “home is the place where, when you have to go there, they have to take you in.” (Robert Frost) We can't avoid the imperfection inherent in living with those we haven't chosen. And even those we choose can disappoint us, and we them.

 

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  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    So, tell us - HOW did you get to be such "a repository of (not so) useless bits of information on ancient religion, spiritual prac
  • Archer
    Archer says #
    I do have a rather futile Masters in English from a very long time ago, but anything I know about the rest is a result of being fa
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Now that is funny! And I know exactly what you mean. Sorry about the double entry before; it looked like the first one hadn't "
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Really nice, as usual. How did you get to be such "a repository of (not so) useless bits of information on ancient religion"? Did
Pagan savings challenge, week thirteen:  lies we tell

One of the gods I regularly worship is Hermes, who among his other associations is god of the marketplace, and god of lies.  If you've ever purchased a car, the link between the two shouldn't come as any surprise; lies are part and parcel of what makes money work.  In fact, it's reasonable to argue that money is itself a lie, or built on one.

That does not erode money's influence or role as a holder of energy (value), although the fact that some people avoid money entirely is understandable.  Rather than resist the lies, I prefer to use them to my advantage.

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  • J'Karrah
    J'Karrah says #
    I always round payments UP to the nearest dollar in my checkbook. Meaning a bill payment of $128.35 gets rounded up to $129 in my

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Poseidon, god of the economy

I took an unscheduled blogbatical as we moved into the darkest time of the year, but I have emerged excited that I missed celebrating perhaps the most important historical festival for my patron deity.

Today is when the festival honoring Poseidon, called Poseidea or Poseidonia, was celebrated in antiquity.  It's a reconstructionist's nightmare, because virtually no record of what went on has been discovered, but the good folk of Elaion put together a Poseidonia ritual based on their understanding of what festivals were usually like.  I didn't see the announcement until just after the agreed-upon time to practice apart together, and I was already late for Quaker meeting, so I had Poseidon close to mind as I joined my local Friends in worship.  (I am not a Quaker, although I attend meeting for worship; I have pondered how Quakers and polytheists fit together for awhile now.)

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Ward, That Canadian $20 bill is wicked cool. Wonderful image, and so appropriate to the discussion.
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    I was thrilled to discover that image -- I feel it was created just for me!
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Ward, Brilliant post. I'd honestly never thought of Poseidon's role with regard to the totality of human economies. It's so t
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    Those are some wonderful insights, Jamie. I'm sure the innocent people in Egypt are stunned to be meeting the new boss, same as t

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Young Hermes finds his grandfather sitting on his throne pensively gazing across his island lost in thought.  “Grandfather tell me a tale.”

b2ap3_thumbnail_Kronos.jpg

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Thank you again for recounting the God lore! I like the child/grandparent storytime motif.
  • Melia Brokaw
    Melia Brokaw says #
    Happy to share! I'm glad you like it!

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