PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Gardnerian
Is there a genuine problem in calling Pagan religions polytheistic?

 

Polytheism, the belief in many Gods, has long been associated with Pagan religion. Some deities speak to us, some speak through us.  Some take our bodies over for a while and some bring us to our knees in awe.  Deities manifest differently in some traditions than others, but all appear part of an animate inspirited world bigger than we are, and Pagans find it appropriate to honor, invoke, learn from, and even love these entities.Often personal altars can be syncretistic, as is this one focused on healing entities and energies.

...
Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    We are on exactly the same page I think!
  • Birch
    Birch says #
    Well, that Quote is merely Gardner's. I get torn honestly. Part of me feels as though One is a disco ball and each deity a singula
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    I think there is much truth here Birch. But it becomes paradoxical if read as if we are in some way more fundamental than the God
  • Birch
    Birch says #
    This Monist approach can be summed up here: the Gods are real, not as persons, but as vehicles of power. Much food for thought upo
Bigghes: or, The Lost Treasure of the Witches

In my previous post about Old English béag, "ring, arm-ring, neck-ring, torc, crown," I was utterly remiss not to have mentioned what is perhaps the word's most obvious link with modern witchcraft.

The fairly obscure Gardnerian term bigghes refers to the High Priestess' parure, i.e. her matched set of jewelry: wristlets, necklace, crown. (Parure. Good old English: we really do have a word for everything. And if we don't, we just pick one up from someone else. Small wonder it's the sacred language of the witches.) The kinship with the Old English word is obvious.

Survival or revival? Wicca being a child of the 20th century, the latter seems indicated here. What it does show is that those early witches were doing their research.

Just as we still do today.

Last modified on
PaganNewsBeagle FaithfulFriday Sept 19

On Faithful Friday the Beagle seeks out interesting tales of religion of all kinds. Today, we have: a story of Siberian shamans; the mysterious theft of the Sehkmet statue -- solved; a new website for British traditional Witchcraft; a Buddhist shrine arises in the inner city; and how people of different faiths (or none) differ and are similar regarding morality.

This story from the Siberian Times offers a glimpse into the world of traditional Siberian shamans. (Trigger warning: story includes visceral photos.)

Last year, the statue of Sekhmet from Las Vegas area Temple of Goddess Spirituality disappeared. Now we know the rest of the story.

...
Last modified on

Additional information