Healing Craft: An exploration of metaphysical healing

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Michelle Simkins

Michelle Simkins

Michelle Simkins grew up in rural Northern Michigan, where she divided her time between reading fantasy novels and wandering the woods. It was no surprise that as an adult she found herself drawn to earth-based spirituality and energetic healing, both of which she's been exploring since 1999. She now lives, works, writes, and studies her craft in the Pacific Northwest.

Stones that are used for healing and magic need to be cleansed and charged regularly. I think it's best to cleanse and charge a stone after any healing work; stones I use as part of my own ritual circles or for meditation can go a little longer, provided my environment is reasonably harmonious and clear.

There are many ways august-woods-1.jpgto cleanse and charge your stones. Purification is often done with incense or smudge stick smoke, or with water and salt. The cleansed stones are then often charged with moonlight, sunlight, reiki, or a witch's intentions. I frequently use some combination of these methods myself.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

 

To be performed during the Waning Moon

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My study of magic and metaphysical healing has emphasized magical herbalism from the beginning. The first pagan book I bought for myself was Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs. I knew nothing about plants at the time; I couldn't even identify lavender or rosemary, and I was a little shaky on dandelions. Sometimes figuring out which herbs to use in a spell was very difficult.

I hadn't yet learned to hear my intuition, much less trust it. So I usually chose herbs off the lists of correspondences in the back of the Encyclopedia and hoped I could buy them from the botánica in my New Orleans neighborhood, or from the bulk section of the Whole Foods across town.

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Note: For readers unfamiliar with Reiki, a basic FAQ page can be found here.

There were five people gathered in our teachers living room for the Reiki Level I class: my girlfriend and myself, a middle aged woman and her former daughter in law, and a thirty-something male lawyer.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    The link to the FAQ is broken because there's an extra "witchesandpagans.com" in it. Just wanted to let you know so less tech-sav
  • Michelle Simkins
    Michelle Simkins says #
    Terence, thank you so much for pointing out that glitch. The error should be fixed now.

As I cross the St. John's Bridge and start up the hill toward my usual Forest Park trailhead, my stomach tightens with anticipation. I've been praying for renewal, for a re-awakening of my spiritual awareness, and today I'm returning to my favorite woods for the first time in months. I walked this path several times a week last summer and fall, finding the sacred in the creaking trees and cool shadows.

May-Forest-Park-10.jpg

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Everyone comes to the healing path in a different way. This is the first post in my "Steps on the Healing Path" series, in which I'll share some of the pivotal moments of my journey.

A slightly different version of this post appeared on my personal blog in 2012.

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The news came at work, in a text from my fiance: Oregon's ban on gay marriage has been overturned, and the state is issuing marriage licenses to gay couples effective immediately.

It's big news for us, because it means when we say our vows next September we'll be able to do it on Oregon soil--or, in our case, sand, because we want to be married on the beach. I immediately have to go lock myself in a bathroom and cry a little bit, because up until this moment I wasn't convinced it was really going to happen.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Stephen M. Stirling
    Stephen M. Stirling says #
    That's a touching and well-written piece. It's sad about your mother, of course, but congratulations on your upcoming vows.
  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    thanks for your piece. so touching.

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