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SageWoman Blogs

At SageWoman magazine, we believe that you are the Goddess, and we're devoted to celebrating your journey. We invite you to subscribe today and join our circle...

Here in the SageWoman section of PaganSquare, our bloggers represent the multi-faceted expressions of the Goddess, feminist, and women's spirituality movements.

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It snowed in the Blue Mountains, where I live. It's always colder here than in Sydney, the mountains - which are not really mountains at all, but a plateau pushed up from the sea one hundred and seventy million years ago - are a kilometre above sea level and have their own weather. Which means that, although it never snows in Sydney, it does sometimes snow up here.

I was coming back from Sydney, on the train and I watched as the rain drops falling outside the window somehow seemed to get lighter, to become blown about by the wind, I watched them becoming snow as the train moved higher and further west. It was late afternoon and out the window I saw small dips in the land filled with ferns carrying a delicate blanket of snow on their fronds, like icing, it was truly magical. I stared and stared.

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“The word ‘rune’ originates in words meaning ‘secret,’ but ‘rune’ has also come to mean ‘a poem, charm, or spell.’ Runar (from the Norse) means ‘a magical sign,’ and runa (from Old German) is ‘to whisper a secret.’ ‘Hidden,’ ‘magic,’ ‘whispers,’ all words long associated with Faery, the secret country. So when we talk of runes, we are speaking of objects that have multiple meanings, letters both worldly and otherworldly in origin and aspect. Their ‘secrets’ may not reside so much in hidden meanings, but in ways of seeing the world. In this sense, each single rune creates layers of phonetics, poetry, and power built up over time. Runes are intended to endure. They record things that must be remembered or heeded. Runes are letters and words that must not be lost or wasted. They embody and express essential knowledge…”

–Brian Froud, Runes of Elfland

Several years ago I had laryngitis and was completely mute. I woke up in the morning with a crystal clear vision of the earth, suspended in space, feeling awe-struck at the majesty and complexity of this planet whirling through space, part of the vast, unfathomable universe. It seemed so clear to me that I was seeing the “invisible net of incarnation” of which we are all a part, the earth held in this enormous web of the universe. Upon rising for the day, I was thinking about my ideas about divinity and reflecting on my cosmological view of the universe as the “body” of the Goddess and the idea that the very web of life itself is the Goddess. Accompanying the sense of majesty was then a profound sense of impersonality. How can I possibly connect personally with something so vast and so powerful? So, as I sat that morning at my little corner altar in the living room, I asked (silently—I had laryngitis, remember!): “what do I need to know about the personalization of the divine?” I drew a Crone Stone from my little bag by the altar…

Remember the laryngitis and then also imagine the huge smile on my face when the stone I drew was, “The Speaker,” with the questions included in the interpretation, “is your voice being heard?” and “how will you share your voice with the world?” And then the final message, “let your voice pour forth like a flowing river…” At this moment I felt I had received an answer to my wonderings—that the Goddess is both as enormous and impersonal as my vision of the web holding the earth and yet also personal enough to offer me this cosmic “wink” through my Crone Stone.

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Dark Side Of The Sun: A Tarot Spread

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Rowan Moonstone
    Rowan Moonstone says #
    Oh, Gods, honey. You KNOW I'm not a summer person. Interesting layout. I'll have to try it. Hard to read for myself, but I'll
  • Arwen Lynch
    Arwen Lynch says #
    You and me both, Rowan! I'd love to hear your thoughts.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I'm a spring and autumn kind of person myself. In one of the nature magazines I came across the word crepuscular referring to ani
  • Arwen Lynch
    Arwen Lynch says #
    Ah yes, the darned mosquito! Crepuscular is a lovely word. Thank you so much for sharing that.
What Sort of Witch Are You?

For some individuals, witchcraft is a journey of finding one's unique style of magic, own cosmology, and personal philosophy.

Have you seen the popular lists of different types of witches—e.g., traditional witch, Gardnerian witch, Faerie witch, eclectic witch, hedge witch—with precise definitions for each category? These charts help some beginners. Learning you fit a certain style can be validating and reassuring. It also makes some newcomers feel they belong. 

But this post is for beginners who find the categories make things really difficult. Everyone else, I'm not naysaying what works for you; this entire post is simply ideas and methods that work for me, in case they're useful to someone. I don't want the charts thrown out. They're great for some people. And with that:

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Honoring Ancestors

It’s interesting that in Hinduism we find steadfast traditions of ancestor reverence existing peacefully alongside a deeply embedded belief in reincarnation. To some, it may seem that these two ideas are irreconcilable. Yet, it is rather the case that they coexist within a framework of beliefs that include conceptions of time and space that are flexible enough to accommodate both.

That is certainly the case from the perspective of Tantrics, who find it absurd to question the validity or moreover, the importance of their veneration of those who have come before. And that is not to say the practice of ancestor worship is unquestioned. Rather, the very roots of Tantric sadhana (spiritual discipline) take practitioners into a state of awareness in which the veracity of other realms where ancestors abound becomes undeniably clear. This is the basis upon which ancestor worship is carried out—from a place of direct experience of them and with them.

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Return

Mine is the sweet honey
That is the elixir of new life.

Mine are the arms that cradle the
Shell of who you have chosen to be.

Mine is the heart that calls
Out to you when you have
Forgotten me.

Mine is the hand that reaches
Out to you when no solace can be found.

Mine is the light that guides you
On the path back to me.

Mine is the truth that you desire
When life ebb’s from you.

Mine is the womb of light
To which you return
To be reborn.

I began this blog 3 years ago which much different intentions than those where the writing has taken me. Life has interjected itself and time has passed leaving at times gaps in what I wanted to say and what I was able to write. This, all part of the “human experience” where what is accomplished and what there is “time to accomplish” are often out of sync.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_sb_sys_medias_media_key_830.jpgThis weekend at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. is the seventh annual Festival in celebration of the Living Earth and the vitality of the Indigenous peoples of the Americas! The events are open to the public. Check out their website at www.nmai.si.edu.

This year the focus is on traditional agricultural practices, which are referred to today by modern people as "sustainability." Indigenous peoples used sustainable agricultural practices for centuries. Another focus of this year's Festival is Indigenous food, including Native Chefs' culinary demonstrations and Indigenous wine tastings. If you have been to the Museum before, or if you live in D.C., you already know that one of the best places to eat in our capitol is at the Mitsitam Cafe in the Indian Museum!b2ap3_thumbnail_sb_sys_medias_media_key_619_20160715-132805_1.jpg

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    So love this Museum - and truly the best "food court" I've ever seen!!!
  • Dr. Mays
    Dr. Mays says #
    Thanks for writing, Lizann! Washingtonians line up daily for the fabulous food at the Museum. Glad you visited.

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