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SageWoman Blogs

At SageWoman magazine, we believe that you are the Goddess, and we're devoted to celebrating your journey. We invite you to subscribe today and join our circle...

Here in the SageWoman section of PaganSquare, our bloggers represent the multi-faceted expressions of the Goddess, feminist, and women's spirituality movements.

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Aine, Celtic Summer Goddess

Aine, (pronounced AW-neh), was originally worshipped as a Sun Goddess. Like so many Celtic goddesses and gods, Aine has assumed many other roles over the years, being seen as a Moon Goddess, a Goddess of Love, a Fertility Goddess, a Healing Goddess, and a Sovereignty Goddess. Aine is also known as a Faery Queen. She is often called Aine, Goddess of Love, Light, and Fertility. Her name means “brightness, glow, joy, radiance; splendor, glory, fame” and she is associated with the abundance of summer.

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Thou Art Goddess: Claiming Your Inner Goddess in the Summer Season

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Christopher Ward
    Christopher Ward says #
    Awesome article Mrs. Karen thank you fer sharin it
  • Karen Clark
    Karen Clark says #
    Why, you're very welcome Christopher. It's a real pleasure to write for SageWomam.
  • Cindy Freeman
    Cindy Freeman says #
    I LOVE this. For most of my life, I've only allowed myself to feel these things on rare occasions. It's not "logical" or "rational
  • Karen Clark
    Karen Clark says #
    You are so welcome Cindy. Yes to tapping into your feminine soul! Blessings!
  • Karen Clark
    Karen Clark says #
    You're welcome! And thanks for the wonderful comment.

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Mother Priestess

A good deal of my Priestessing has been child rearing as of late, I am at home with a three and a half month old and a three and a half year old. For those of you that haven't heard of threenagers or haven't experienced the joys of a baby that wants desperately to be on the move and talking, yet lacks the skills to accomplish such desires, let me assure you our home is full of great big emotions, including this Mama working daily to redirect her passionate energy away from impatience and explosions and into gentle guidance through the beautifully bright rainbow landscape of emotions. 

 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    Thank you, I will do my best.Is there anything specific you wish to know about?Let me know.
  • Candise
    Candise says #
    Bless you Tasha! I would love any Crone wisdom that you have to pass on!
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    What a beautiful piece you have written. In my crone years I feel fortunae o have access to so much that was unthinkable in my ear

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

The World is Your Oracle b2ap3_thumbnail_April-2017-003.JPG

by Nancy Vedder-Shults
Fair Winds Press
First edition, 2017

Review by Molly Remer

The World is Your Oracle begins by looking at three types of diviners and divinatory experiences and also the science of divination. The remainder of the book is then organized into three sections, one for each broad category of divination: visual, auditory, and kinesthetic. This form of organization makes the book read like a delightful "buffet" of possibilities, offering a snapshot overview of each method of divination, steps to take to experience it, and suggestions for further study. The World is Your Oracle is not a specifically pagan book, but instead is markedly (and enjoyably!) interfaith in approach, while also being culturally respectful.

The World is Your Oracle is impeccably organized and very clear. It is also very easy to simply flip through the book and arrive spontaneously on a technique to try. Thanks to the clear organizational style, consistent format, and extensive cross-referencing with companion page numbers, you will have no problem jumping into an experience wherever the pages happen to open! Due to the broad topic and many subjects covered, the sections are brief, meaning that someone desiring to study a particular method in depth will need to seek out additional resources in order to do so. I did wish there had been a bit more time spent on the how's, whys, and purposes of divination in general as well as possibly information about cultivating, developing, and enriching one's oracular skill, but as the whole, this book is a beautiful, enriching, and comprehensive manual of divination modalities and options.

The illustrations by Linnea Vedder in The World is Your Oracle are absolutely gorgeous. They are full color throughout the book which is an unusual and special treat and each oracular method described has a companion illustration, rich in symbolism and opportunity for contemplation in and of itself. I found myself wishing they would publish a companion oracle deck of all the beautiful images from this book!

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Danu, Crones and Discernment

The long days and short nights bring a whirl of external activities. Shortly before Summer Solstice, on 18th June, was the feast of the goddess Danu, for whom I have a special devotion. I consider her the local goddess since it is said that her tribe, the Tuatha dé Danaan, landed in what became known as Erin, in the mountain bounding the parish I live in. I think of Danu as the Crone of Crones, the Grandmother Goddess over all. Over a period of spiritual discernment I perceived her as matron over what I call The Age of the Crone.

Slieve Anieran, or the Iron Mountain, overlooks Ballinagleragh and Drumshambo in County Leitrim, and it is atop this mountain it is said their ships of silver and gold landed. But they burnt their boats and stayed until they disappeared into the sídh after the Second Battle of Moytura when the Milesians defeated them. The Bronze Age had truly arrived I suppose. Perhaps this was when Danu's feast day was on the wane and Solstice celebrations came to the fore. The Grand Old Woman, the gift giver, began to be less valued. New gods and goddesses came to be worshipped.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Bee Smith
    Bee Smith says #
    It is all grist to the story mill. Since it is pre-history there is neither propaganda or any written record. Just the stones and
  • Andrew
    Andrew says #
    I've always thought of the defeat of the Tuatha as the coming of the Iron Age because of the Fae hatred of iron. The Tuatha retrea
  • Bee Smith
    Bee Smith says #
    The Iron Age is a bit of a late comer at 700BC. It isn't that the Fae hate iron. They need iron to break ties irrevocably with a p
  • Andrew
    Andrew says #
    But isn't iron considered deadly to the Fae, or at least allergic to it? There is also contention as to when Celts (Milesians, be
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    This is very beautiful and I really liked the part about discernment. It made me tik, and appreciate the ability hat develops over
The Illusion of Perfect Control

The expectation of perfect control over self or circumstances ruins spiritual health and blocks one’s most precious goals. Finding power and peace in the uncontrollable nature of life is my shamanic ideal and the magical road toward achieving my heartfelt dreams.

 

A common response to someone considered a spiritual master is placing them on a pedestal from which they can only fall. This attitude enforces unhealthy hierarchy and is based on the idea that some people are better than others.

 

Another typical response to the concept of spiritual masters is embodied in the phrase "If you see Buddha on the road, kill him." This seems to refute hierarchy and false superiority by creating egalitarianism. But the metaphor of killing Buddha misses the boat as a remedy because I can't imagine a spiritual master buying into hierarchy and superiority in the first place. I believe an advanced being would teach that all humans, themselves included, are spiritually frail and limited. A spiritual master would not put her or himself above others.

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  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    What can I do? About releasing control, (shakes head) what control? Blessed Be, Tasha
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Well said, Tasha! Thanks. Blessed be.
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