Recently I was visiting Long Beach, Washington and while I was there I ended up visiting another site for the Confluence Project. Turns out that Long Beach was actually the first site consecrated for the project and what was fascinating to me was that you could see 5 different parts of the project. There was a board walk with writing on it about the geographic and historical dates for the Lewis and Clark trail, an amphitheater, a fish cleaning table and a view point. And all of those places were intriguing but the one which really spoke to me was the Cedar Grove Circle.

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The cedar grove is this grove of trees. On the path to the trees is an invocation of the 7 directions. I recommend reading it as you walk up to the grove. The trees have these metal plates in them and when you walk into that space it feels like you go into a different world. You are closer to the spirit world there. 

I stayed there for a little while communing with the land, the spirits, the Columbia river, the ocean and She Who Watches. Being in that space wasn't about doing something, but it was about being with something and letting it speak through me.

Then I hiked the park, just taking in the various parts of it. I found a tree (pictured above) where a hollow had been made and marveled at the site, appreciating the magic of it and the gift. And at one point I came to this cliff where I was able to see this bay where the ocean and land kissed.

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I walked the land, taking it in, even as it took me in. I let myself get to know it, knowing as well I'd go back to this place which is so magical and speaks of the confluence of land and water, of nature and people, of cultures mixing and meeting.

I still have a couple more places to visit, which I'll share in a future blog post.

Read day 1 here

Read Day 2 here

All pictures copyright Taylor Ellwood 2018

Taylor Ellwood is a magical experimenter and the author of a number of magic books including Pop Culture Magick, Space/Time Magic and the Process of Magic. When he's not working on his magical book or experimenting with magic, Taylor can be found writing fiction and enjoying the Pacific Northwest. To learn more, visit Magical Experiments