Pagan Studies


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Studies Blogs

Advanced and/or academic Pagan subjects such as history, ethics, sociology, etc.

Call for Papers: Finding the Masculine in Goddess' Spiral: Men in Ritual, Community and Service to the Goddess

Megalithica Books, an imprint of Immanion Press (Stafford, U.K./Portland, OR, U.S.A) is seeking submissions for Finding the Masculine in Goddess' Spiral: Men in Ritual, Community and Service to the Goddess.

E-MAIL FOR INQUIRIES AND SUBMISSIONS:
Erick DuPree:  please put “Finding the Masculine in the Goddess Anthology” in your subject line.

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  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Thanks for the notice, Taylor!
  • Siri Snow
    Siri Snow says #
    I believe an important part of Goddess traditions is balance, and that the masculine is the counterpart to the Goddess, just like
  • Susan Harper
    Susan Harper says #
    Carol, I totally agree with you about the terms masculine and feminine -- I wish we could see all traits as potentially present in
  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    Love the concept and the subtitle. I think this is an important issue. We all need to be able to affirm that our bodies ourselves

Posted by on in Studies Blogs

In common with the majority of Neopagans, I am a devotee of the Goddess. I spent the first half of my life in a masculine God-based religion, then felt drawn to explore the other side of things and to learn as much as I could about the Divine Mother. She has been my focus ever since. I see Her reflected in the best qualities of women I have met, and I often recognize her gentle and compassionate nature in men, too—underneath the stereotypical bluster and mindless arrogance which our pop culture likes to impose on us.

The downside, of course, is that—as a heterosexual man—I sometimes feel guilt about the historical subjugation of women, in a similar way that as a white man I feel guilt about the history of black slavery. While as a 60's flower child my personal sentiments have always been 100% on the side of women's equality and civil rights, it is obvious to any observer that I am a male of Caucasian descent; so I am connected, by association, with all males and all whites who came before me. But I am not one of the stereotypes. I am not an Archie Bunker. 

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  • Siri Snow
    Siri Snow says #
    From the small and forgotten, but very masonic Nova Scotia.
  • Siri Snow
    Siri Snow says #
    I agree with you Ted, heterosexual (especially white) males have a stigma attached to them...well to be fair I would say every cul
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Wow, what great comments from all of you! Siri, thank you so much for understanding where I was coming from; the only dental surg
  • Brandy
    Brandy says #
    This comment thread is very interesting to me, and coincidentally occurring during a period of time when I have been trying to ans
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    No problem; upon re-reading, I see that the twinkle isn't very obvious unless you know me. I happen, by the way, to be shorter th

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
More in my continuing series on this rich Viking source: be sure to catch up on the other stanzas.

 

48.
Mildir, fræknir
menn bazt lifa,
sjaldan sút ala;
en ósnjallr maðr
uggir hotvetna,
sýtir æ glöggr við gjöfum.
 

 

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  • Kate Laity
    Kate Laity says #
    Merci, ma cherie.
  • Byron Ballard
    Byron Ballard says #
    So beautiful, powerful.

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Morning Glory’s “Wake”

My old friend Anna Korn and I drove up to the Zell compound in Cotati after I finished with the Wiccan circle at San Quentin, so we weren’t there from the very beginning.  When we arrived, there were cars parked up and down both sides of the country road outside their home and the place was packed.  There was a proverbial groaning board in the dining room that kept acquiring more and more dishes of food.  Platters of ham, beef, chicken for the carnivores.  All manner of salads and side dishes – beans, pasta, greens, tomatoes and pomegranate seeds, you name it.  Plus veggies, breads and many tasty chips for dipping in many tasty dips.  There were also food tables out on the various decks surrounding the house, with plenty of folks outside, too.  There was a seemingly endless supply of wines and other potables, including Pyrate Jenny with her lovely basket filled with about a dozen different flasks, each containing some kind of whiskey or rum.

People congregated in the two living rooms, the den, and in several seating clusters on the surrounding decks.  During this time Zack Darling, using a fancy video camera with a tripod and a handheld mic, recorded stories about Morning Glory from individual friends and lovers.

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  • Constance Tippett Chandler
    Constance Tippett Chandler says #
    Thanks for sharing this. For those of us who spent time with her briefly, and sadden by her lose, and couldn't be there... Thanks
The Difference between Concept and Experience

One of the issues that I notice comes up a lot in the writing I see on magic is that the conceptual aspects of magic tend to be emphasized over the experiential aspects of magic. Now part of the reason for this simple could be due to the fact that writing about a topic inevitably moves that topic toward concept. However when we leave out the experiential aspects of a practice, the concept itself is diminished because what it presents is the theory without the grounding of practice. Experience necessarily grounds concept and provides the context to turn a given concept into a reality. It's important then to make a distinction between concept and experience, in order to make sure we're utilizing both in our spiritual practices.

A concept is not, in and of itself, a theory, so much as it is an idea. A concept only becomes a theory when we bring it into an experiential level. A concept attempts to describe how something ought to work as well as what the various variables are that effect the concept. A lot of the writing we see on magic is concept focused because the writer is trying to share how something ought to work with the reader, as well as providing the necessary background information that informs the concept.

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Beltane and the Dance of Opposites

     When I moved to Kitchener many years ago and was looking for the house in which to put down my roots, there was one house which I knew was unquestionably mine. For one, the backdoor had a window etched with Celtic knotwork. Gorgeous! For another, it was a mere block from a permanently installed Maypole. Wondrous! Though the Maypole serves to present banners for the various local German clubs that rock into activity during Oktoberfest, it can’t help but bring to mind the tradition that marked the beginning of Summer in ages past. I loved the idea of living within daily sight of a Maypole and it never fails to fill my heart with joy, even these many years after I first saw it.

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This isn't my usual post about music, but music kind of drew me in a weird direction, because I joined a band with people in it I didn't know, and then this happened.

Sometimes, it doesn't work. The relationship.  Sometimes, no matter how hard you try to respect someone, and no matter how hard they try to respect you, your respective respect for each other just...isn't. Here's a story.

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  • Amarfa
    Amarfa says #
    You're welcome! It comes from hard experience. As Pagans, we're focused on getting along, and world peace, and sometimes it benef
  • Deborah Blake
    Deborah Blake says #
    This is fabulous. Thanks for sharing.

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