Pagan Studies


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Studies Blogs

Advanced and/or academic Pagan subjects such as history, ethics, sociology, etc.

Gender Role Switching in Opera-A Source List

Peter Ringo asked if I would write an article on Gender Roles in Opera.  I can't.  There are already so many good ones out there and I'd just be stealing their work.  I would much rather create a list of good articles so we can get a good discussion going about how these things came about and continue today, and see what may possibly apply to modern day GLBTQ-types of Pagans and our music at large.

So, here are some articles and my own little paraphrases of what they are about:

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Hand, Heart, & Eye

 

There are many of late who have written about abuse in the Pagan community. This is not the first time that I have seen a rise in the discussion and the debate on how to deal with these serious problems. After a time, when the acute triggering incidents have faded from the collective memory and from news coverage, we drift back towards business as usual. I have seen this pattern wax and wane several times in several communities. Some people focus on the specific individuals, their transgressions and how they should be dealt with. Others respond by creating policy statements or rules that are to be adopted and enforced by organizations. Some, and we should offer a special blessing for them, choose to focus their efforts on supporting and healing those that have been injured. Like all crises, when troubled times like these arise the best and the worst comes forth.

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  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    Thanks Ivo. This is good advice. In addition, I think we need to have a critique of patriarchy and all forms of domination includ
  • Ivo Dominguez Jr
    Ivo Dominguez Jr says #
    Dear Carol, I certainly agree with you on this. I believe that critiques and analysis are a part of the solution.
Doing the Work is where Learning Occurs

In the Process of Magic class, one of the expectations I lay out there is that people taking the class will ideally do daily work. I feel that daily work is an essential part of magical practice, and not something which can be ignored if you are really serious about studying magic. However daily work is only part of the equation. Another part is making sure that the core skills of magical practice are developed. You need to build a foundation that supports the magical work you do. This means spending some time learning those core skills, which may not be glamorous, but nonetheless are important because of how such practices provide the necessary experience to handle more advanced work.

Still the question that may arise is this: Is it is possible to make magic more accessible, to teach it in a way that makes it possible for anyone to pick it up? The answer to that question is both yes and no. It's yes, in the sense that it is possible to write about magic in a way that strips away the esotericism and focuses on the technique, but it's no in the sense that unless the person is actually willing to do the work, willing to apply what is read into actual, experiential practice, it is very hard for a person to get a lot of meaning out of magic. The student must do the work. Without doing the work the magic is just a concept, and the student is just an armchair magician. In the process of magic, one of my goals was to explore the fundamental process of magic by examining how techniques work. I feel that if you can help someone understand how a technique works, understand the principles that inform the actions, then what you do is make magic not only more accessible, but you also show a person how to personalize magic.

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So, a friend let me borrow a book to review.  It’s called ‘Rhythmajick’ and on the front it says: Practical Uses of Number, Rhythm, and Sound.  by Z’EV.  I sat down with my drum one day and opened the book, looking for inspiration.

If I had a picture of myself scratching my head, I’d attach it to this post.  You see, I’m a musician and I know how to read music.  I’m also an educator and I know how to teach music.  A lot of people learn music by rote instead of reading it, so it can be hard to write about music if you don’t have the notation. 

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  • Travis Crockett
    Travis Crockett says #
    Hahaha Yes Yes YES to all of this. Im actually working with a musician to produce some sound scapes for meditation on the Tarot.
  • Amarfa
    Amarfa says #
    Something I do recommend is a book by Joscelyn Godwin, titled "Music, Mysticism and Magic." It's a series of excerpts from early

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Deific Multiplicity.

Before the blog entry proper, Id like to state that the ideas proposed are still in a somewhat incubatory stage. That said, I invite your criticism and thoughts on the topic. Still needing to flesh out the ideas and needing better metaphors, I offer up the discussion here for better ways to express these thoughts. Thank you.

 

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  • Al
    Al says #
    All good points. Personally I think that the truth lies somewhere between elevated ancestor spirits and archetypes when it comes t
  • Travis Crockett
    Travis Crockett says #
    haha pardon domesticality*
  • Travis Crockett
    Travis Crockett says #
    Al, that's a brilliant analogy! You articulated what I fumbled with in less than stellar language. What I feel like will will be a
  • Al
    Al says #
    I'll take a stab at this. First, the 'facets of divinity' approach might be missing the point by not further defining 'divinity'.

The following reflections came to me gradually over a period of forty-two years. I offer them here because of their universal spirituality, and also because our 21st century culture has turned Yoga into something quite different from its original purpose—which was, in fact, very close to Druidry. 

1971 was the year I took my first Yoga class. It was part of Actors' Training at the Stratford National Theatre of Canada. Our movement coach (Trish Arnold, http://www.teawithtrish.com/) presented yoga as a physical discipline—a means whereby performing artists could develop and maintain ultimate flexibility and endurance. 

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  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Ted, a lovely musing, thank you. I love the phrase "The greater the leader was, the more he was in touch with the natural world an
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Dear Francesca, Yes, exactly! It's not what people call themselves, it's how they conduct themselves based on their inner inspira
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Thank you. One thing I miss from the old pagan days (I've blogged on this but cld not find the blog to give u its link, LOL) is ho
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    It may be the way of things, but it's a shame. Ravyn and I had the same experience in a New Thought Center 20 years ago. When we f
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    It is definitely "the way of things," to use yr phrase. Unfortunately, it usually ends up with the organization run by small min
Call for Papers: Finding the Masculine in Goddess' Spiral: Men in Ritual, Community and Service to the Goddess

Megalithica Books, an imprint of Immanion Press (Stafford, U.K./Portland, OR, U.S.A) is seeking submissions for Finding the Masculine in Goddess' Spiral: Men in Ritual, Community and Service to the Goddess.

E-MAIL FOR INQUIRIES AND SUBMISSIONS:
Erick DuPree:  please put “Finding the Masculine in the Goddess Anthology” in your subject line.

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  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Thanks for the notice, Taylor!
  • Siri Snow
    Siri Snow says #
    I believe an important part of Goddess traditions is balance, and that the masculine is the counterpart to the Goddess, just like
  • Susan Harper
    Susan Harper says #
    Carol, I totally agree with you about the terms masculine and feminine -- I wish we could see all traits as potentially present in
  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    Love the concept and the subtitle. I think this is an important issue. We all need to be able to affirm that our bodies ourselves

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