She Who Wears Antlers

A place to experience the archetype of the ancient mother, and explore why she is rejuvenating and empowering force for modern women. Exploring creativity as a sacred meditation with the divine – from sacred art that can inspire us in our everyday actions and relationships – with ourselves, each other and the earth.

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Jude Lally

Jude Lally

 Jude Lally is an artist and writer whose role and work focuses on reclaiming the ancient stories of wise women ways and of women’s mysteries. She offers creative ways to approach our ancestors and offers opportunities for women to share their inspiration and visions fostering ways to root such wisdom into our lives and communities for the good of each other, all webs of life and the planet herself.

She grew up a few miles from Loch Lomond, where the river Leven meets the mighty River Clyde, on the West Coast of Scotland.   She gained her master's degree in Human Ecology at the University of Strathclyde (Glasgow, Scotland) with her thesis ‘Fire in the Head, Heart and Hand. A Study of the Goddess Brigit as Goddess Archetype and her Relevance to Cultural Activists in Contemporary Scotland.    
She moved to Asheville, NC in 2009 where she runs 'Sisterhood of the Antlers' a free online community which follows the Wheel of the Year. She leads an annual pilgrimage to Scotland - the Ancestral Mothers of Scotland Retreat.

Visist her website www.celticsoulcraft.com for more details of in-person workshops, online courses, her retreat and SIsterhood of the Antlers community.

Jude Lally is an artist and writer whose role and work focuses on reclaiming the ancient stories of wise women ways and of women’s mysteries. She offers creative ways to approach our ancestors and offers opportunities for women to share their inspiration and visions fostering ways to root such wisdom into our lives and communities for the good of each other, all webs of life and the planet herself. 

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As we approach Winter Solstice there are many wonderful tales to tell. Tales that have been shared around fires for thousands of years.I have been working a lot creating prayer beads and this is a rather special limited edition set inspired by the Cailleach. They were made on the day of the full moon and now in the time of the waning moon as we approach the Winter Solstice the white moonstone holds that magic of the stillness and quiet this time of year can offer if we step away from the maddening crowds and take our inspiration from the landscape whose trees and plants have returned deep down to their roots.

 

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  • JudithAnn
    JudithAnn says #
    Thank you. The guided meditation and music was beautiful. I have been connecting with the Cailleach for the past few dark seasons

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Click on the image to view beads in shop

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I’ve always felt the steady rhythm of beads moving through your fingers comforting.  They introduce a regularity, a heartbeat which calms my racing mind. From Catholic Rosary beads as a child or in later years rounds of mala beads provided this route yet neither fitted as they weren’t of my tradition. While I am only vaguely familiar with traditional Celtic prayer beads – the Paidirinean, I was drawn to create Celtic Soul Craft Prayer Beads.

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Dumb Supper

I value the snippets of Samhain my grandmother fed me - a crumpled aged piece of paper that described a rite for carrying out a Dumb Supper. It outlined laying out place settings for those ancestors recently departed with place names inviting them to the Samhain meal. One of the main roles of the Dumb Supper was to say goodbye to any relatives who had died but were still around, those relatives that were finding it hard to leave the living and fully cross over to the other side. 

 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Hill-of-the-Cailleach-Collage.jpgThe Hill of the Cailleach, Isle of Eigg, Scotland

When you look over the folklore of Scotland and Ireland you'll find that the cailleach is known by many names, this is because she was a localized deity. She was the cailleach of your loch, your mountain or moorland - this then gave her different qualities and animals and stories associated with her. I don't know all the different Cailleach's only the one I grew up and  I know her by the animals, birds and plants of the Loch Lomond area and by the weather that sweeps in and different aspects of her can be seen throughout the seaons. 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Keening-Women.jpgWe’re in an in between place right now, Imbolc has passed but it’s not quite Spring Equinox yet. One day it seems like full blown spring and then the next we’re plunged back into winter. Maybe you still haven’t thrown off some of the Imbolc layers which can see us feeling fragile and full of unease. Maybe part of that unease comes from a past down worry of our ancestors which is knitted into our bones, worries about food supplies running out and hungry mouths to feed. Maybe part of that unease is that many who are ill can’t say yes to another year of living and choose instead to make their journey to the next world.

 

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