Pagan Paths


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Paths Blogs

Specific paths such as Heathenism, blended traditions, polytheist reconstructionism, etc.

Ethereal Ways: The Fifth (and First) Element

In various books and internet resources dealing with elemental magic, paths and witchcraft, there are often chapters devoted to “The Water Witch”, “The Fire Witch”, and so on. There are also usually sections intended to help you “discover your element” or “what kind of elemental witch are you?”

In the explorations of “Eclectic Elementals”, I will be expounding on similar concepts but in the terms of the elemental “Path”, not just “Witch”. While magical practice is frequently a key aspect of many Pagan spiritualities, particularly as regards the Elements - the cornerstone of almost all magical workings - I have found that not all who practice magic always identify as “witches”.

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Asatruars Embrace Wolfenoot

Some Asatruars have embraced the new pop culture holiday Wolfenoot, invented by a child as a holiday to honor canines, including dogs and wolves, and the people who love them. Some Asatruars have also started their own animal related holidays in reaction to Wolfenoot, including Kitten Nacht and Bearenfornia.

The 7 year old boy who invented Wolfenoot wanted a holiday in which the wolf spirit brings gifts to people who have been kind to dogs. It is celebrated by eating roast meats and a cake decorated to look like the full moon. It is celebrated on Nov. 23rd; the child stated that was the date when the Great Wolf died, according to the original post by the boy's mother, Jax Goss.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    Anthony, certainly someone should tell them what it's all about!
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Here in Virginia they make a big to-do about the first thanksgiving being held at Berkley Plantation two years before the pilgrims
Autumn in Japan: A season of the moon, ancestors, and gods

It is now Autumn in Japan, one of the most important seasons of the year.

There are four big events, starting with Shubun no Hi (Autumn Equinox), Tsukimi (Autumn Full Moon viewing), Kannazuki or Kanarizuki (Month Without or Month with Kami), and then Shuuki Taisai or Shuuki Reitaisai, (Autumn Grand Ceremony).

It is no surprise Autumn is an important time in Shinto and Japanese culture. As with many cultures and spiritualities around the world that are in tune with nature, Autumn is the all-important harvest season. A season to reap the bounties and give gratitude toward nature and the ancestors, deities, and other spirits to survive the cold upcoming Winter. In addition, it is a time of celebration, family, gathering, introspection, and reflection.

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  • Aryós Héngwis
    Aryós Héngwis says #
    I always love you providing these details. Autumn seems to be a special time of the year in many places (I know the Mid-Autumn Fes
  • Courtney
    Courtney says #
    This was lovely and informative. Thank you.

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Let It Mean Something

Visiting my mom in the old folk’s home is a lot like going on retreat. On retreat, the days can be long, as I sit, eat, and walk in a silence punctuated with my own restless thoughts. On my visits to my mom, we too sit, eat, and walk in a silence punctuated by her restless, repetitive questions (“Why did you come? Are you my guest? Why am I here?”) and my repetitive answers. Just as on retreat, there are moments of peace, stretches of boredom and periods of head-nodding semi-sleep, both of us upright in our chairs. For the days I’m there, nothing new is happening. Nothing much is being accomplished. It’s the same thing, over and over.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Thank you for this beautiful reminder, Archer. I used to wonder what was wrong with me, that I always seemed drawn to form relati
  • Tyger
    Tyger says #
    Thank you for bringing this to us.
  • Anne Newkirk Niven
    Anne Newkirk Niven says #
    Archer, this story breaks my heart -- in the best possible way. Thank you for sharing it with us. Peace to you, your mother, and a
  • Archer
    Archer says #
    Thank you for these words Anne.
Walking the Labyrinth in Modern Minoan Paganism

The labyrinth. Everyone has heard of it. It's one of the first things people think of when I mention that my spiritual practice has a Minoan focus. They might think of the beautiful labyrinth set into the floor at Chartres cathedral, or the story of Theseus and the Minotaur, or modern projects like the Pulse Memorial in Orlando, Florida (USA).

It's interesting, then, that no one has ever found an actual labyrinth at a Minoan site. There are lots of almost-but-not-quite-labyrinth meander patterns in Minoan art. And the labyrinth does show up on Cretan coins, but not until many centuries after Minoan civilization was gone.

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A Gift from the Dying

I'll cut to the chase: we're all dying. It's the only guaranteed fact of our lives: we die.

Atheopaganism doesn't promise an afterlife. There really isn't compelling evidence to support the idea of one, and so we conclude (tentatively, at least) that it is unlikely that there is one.

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Lovely fall is upon us!  Kirk Thomas is wrapping up the last of what can be done this year at White Mountain Druid Sanctuary.  

Samona’s Shrine has some more details completed that are hard to see.  We are still trying to make sure the fountain is mouse-proof. The ground has been leveled out.  And we are figuring out where to put the solar panel that will power the fountain. The sun shines on the left side of the Shrine but the fountain is on the right - is the cord long enough?  These questions will be answered over the winter. Here is a picture right now.

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