Pagan Paths


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Paths Blogs

Specific paths such as Heathenism, blended traditions, polytheist reconstructionism, etc.

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(excerpted from my book, Visions of Vanaheim)

b2ap3_thumbnail_candles.jpgAt the end of October is Rasthuas Mahareyan (RAHS-thoo-ahs mah-hah-RAY-ahn), which is Eshnesk (the language of the Eshnahai, the name the Vanir call themselves [via corroborated gnosis]) for the Lights of Remembrance.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Comet_Halley_and_the_Milky_Way.jpg(an excerpt from my book, Visions of Vanaheim)

Some time after Star Mother birthed the Serpent Twins, and the Serpent Twins made the world, the cycles of life and death, living and dying, began upon that world. And even though Star Mother knew it was necessary, and that life feeds on life, she still shed tears, feeling the pain of every living thing in its struggles, and in its dying process. Those tears were the only record kept of those lives and those pain, for eons. Eventually, she shed so many tears that she was almost drowning in them.

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Death Becomes Us

I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about death lately. It’s Autumn here in the Northern Hemisphere, the time of year when the trees drop their leaves and the natural world looks like it’s dying. But the concept of death became much more personal a few days ago when my father-in-law had a stroke and then passed away. I was not with him when he died but my mind immediately went back to a time when I experienced death firsthand: my firstborn child died in my arms at the age of five. That was a closer shave with death than most modern people have. But in ancient times, death was a much more familiar companion.

Like most cultures up until just a century or two ago, the ancient Minoans experienced death close up. The elderly and the ill died in their own beds at home. The family washed the body and prepared it for burial, anointing it with precious oils and resins and winding a linen cloth around it. They carried the body to the tomb themselves, perhaps on a cart or even in their arms if the deceased was a small child. They held funeral rites at the tomb as the body was placed within the beehive-shaped building, its form a reminder of the Ancestors and the Goddess who watched over the dead.

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Samhain In the Mysterious Monasshe Mountains, B.C.

The Big Leap: From Jerusalem to Little Fort, UFO Trench of British Columbia, Population 100.

Our amazing two year sojourn in Israel was over. September was commencing and we were back in Canada. My husband had completed his military releases in Ottawa and we had patiently traversed across Canada, now to locate a new home in the British Columbia wilderness. It was 1993.

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The Mighty Dead in Conversation with DeAnna...

The Mighty Dead - It's a pretty epic sounding title. It sounds like a summer blockbuster movie to me, but really, who are the Mighty Dead? Well, it depends a little on who you ask but the most common answer to that question goes something like "those in the Craft that have gone before us, whose shoulders we stand on, those nameless persecuted witches, the founders of traditions, Pagan Activists..." etc, etc.

I like that as a definition. It serves well. I also like the slightly less grand version of the Mighty Dead - Those that I've known personally that have deeply affected my view of the Craft. And with that, here's my tribute to the person that always comes to mind when I hear the phrase "The Mighty Dead"

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Frau Holle by Otto Ubbelohde. Frau Holle (or the young girl who faithfully served her) by Otto Ubbelohde.

In this ritual, you will mirror the actions of the heroine in one of the Grimm's fairy tales, "Mother Holle", (also known as "The Golden Girl and the Pitch Maiden"), offering your cares and worries to the Goddess by dropping them on a spindle into a fresh water "well" and praying for her assistance in resolving them. A traditional Northern European blot, a drink offering, begins the ritual. This simplified rite, suitable to any time of year, is part of a longer Norse Winternights Ceremony I wrote honoring the ancestors and the Wild Hunt during the autumn. An especially ideal time for it would be on Mothers' Night, the evening before Yule. (More information on Holle's symbols and nature can be found within that Ceremony.)

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