Pagan Paths


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form

Paths Blogs

Specific paths such as Heathenism, blended traditions, polytheist reconstructionism, etc.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
We Honour the Earth (Mother)

b2ap3_thumbnail_ED4.JPGb2ap3_thumbnail_ED5.JPGb2ap3_thumbnail_ED6.JPGb2ap3_thumbnail_ED7.JPGb2ap3_thumbnail_ED8.JPGb2ap3_thumbnail_ED1.JPG

We honour the Earth on this day:

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Empty

Emptiness terrifies me. And I long for it.

 

Empty hours and empty days threaten me with meaninglessness. Between jobs, or simply at loose ends, I might feel guilt, shame, or the fear of not being real. In fact even my empty minutes need to be filled with reading, TV, or some other distraction. Waiting for the bus, I have to check my phone. There’s a nameless anxiety lurking in that unoccupied space. 

Last modified on

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

 

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Offering to the Minoan Gods

Modern Minoan Paganism is a pretty broad path. People come to it from many different directions and backgrounds; our commonalities are the pantheon, the Minoan sacred calendar, and a few basic practices that we all share. Prominent among these is making offerings to the Minoan gods and goddesses. The image at the top of this post is a lovely three-footed offering table from Akrotiri decorated with dolphins. Perhaps its owner left fruit or flowers or seashells some other offering on it, maybe dedicated to the ocean goddess Posidaeja or another favorite deity (though I'd vote for Posidaeja because of the dolphins).

Solid items can be set out on the altar or offering stands or at an appropriate outdoor location. Liquid offerings can also be set out in a cup or pitcher, or they can be poured out as libations. A libation can be poured into another container (a bowl, for instance) or onto the ground. A libation can even be the centerpiece of a ritual for abundance.

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Labyrinths

Labyrinths

The dictionary definition of a labyrinth is:

...
Last modified on
Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Nimue Brown
    Nimue Brown says #
    How easy a design is to make depends a lot on how big it is - the more circles there are, the harder it gets, and the more materia
From Rabbits to Resurrections: The Pagan Origins of Easter

As those of us who honor the old ways know, many of our traditions have been usurped by other religions who go on to claim them as their own.  Easter is a colorful example of this.

Although many people assume Easter began as a Christian holiday, it did not.  This spring holiday began as, and still is, a very pagan one. While Christians celebrate their god's resurrection, so do other faiths and traditions that existed for millennia before Christianity was established. From the Egyptian god Osiris to the Greek god Dionysus -- among others -- a god's resurrection has always been a fairly common theme.  The phoenix - who dies and then rises from its own ashes three days later - may also have influenced the Christian belief that their god died and rose three days later.

...
Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Anne Newkirk Niven
    Anne Newkirk Niven says #
    And yet another take, this one from Pagan News site The Wild Hunt: http://wildhunt.org/2017/04/uk-pagans-respond-to-questions-on-t
  • Anne Newkirk Niven
    Anne Newkirk Niven says #
    For a religious studies perspective on this complex tale of Ostara, Easter, bunnies and more, cf http://religionnews.com/2017/04/1
  • Thesseli
    Thesseli says #
    Countdown to people insisting "The word Easter has no connection to Eastre (or Eostre, or Ostara, or Astarte, or Aset, or Ishtar,
  • Aryós Héngwis
    Aryós Héngwis says #
    It is related to Ostara/Eastre (and Aurora for that matter) but not Ishtar, which is an unrelated Semitic goddess with a very diff
  • Andrew Keller
    Andrew Keller says #
    You just proved the first commenter's point, you know.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Season of the Bones

I know, right?  I'm in the wrong season.  Bones are for Samhain, when the Wheel turns us toward the dark, and we contemplate our mortality, gazing into the shadowed eye-sockets of a bleached skull.  Bones are not for spring, not for warm weather and shoots of green and vernal bunnies.  Bones are a bit macabre for that, yes?  ... I thought so too.

But here on the farm we have a black dog named Shadow, who has a love affair with bones.  Throughout the late fall and winter, while the butchering season endures, Shadow delights in raiding the slaughter-pen for all types of cast-off body parts:  hoofs, pigtails, chicken heads, whatever.  And for some strange reason she drags them all into our front yard.

...
Last modified on

Additional information