Pagan Paths


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Paths Blogs

Specific paths such as Heathenism, blended traditions, polytheist reconstructionism, etc.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Where Poets Go

After my 2 wedding visions, I was no longer sure where I would go when I die. For 25 years I had expected to go to Freya in Folkvangr. I had previously had a brief glimpse of Odin appearing to me at death, as I related in my post Seeing My Own Death in the Runes, but I had not really thought that I would go to him because I thought his humans went to Valhalla, and Valhalla was only for the battle dead. I don't expect to die in battle, and I would not really want to join the army after death anyway, and that's what going to Valhalla means. It's not Heaven or Paradise, it's a training base for the Last War. It did not sound appealing to me. 

I didn't want to fight on the other side either. I had always expected to sit out the Last War, as Freya's dead humans are not prophesied to participate in it. I always pictured Folkvangr as a place where both battle dead and some other types of people went. And cats. I pictured cats.

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  • Tiffany34
    Tiffany34 says #
    After 9 years in marriage with my hubby with 3 kids, my husband started going out with other ladies and showed me cold love, on s
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I once read that we lay our path through the afterlife in the dreams we have while living. If that's true then I have two or thre

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Shells & Sea Glass

Shells

Living near the sea I am lucky enough to be able to collect sea shells easily, I love walking along the beach and always come back with pockets full of shells and hag stones.

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  • Tiffany34
    Tiffany34 says #
    After 9 years in marriage with my hubby with 3 kids, my husband started going out with other ladies and showed me cold love, on s

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Community Spirit

There was a time that Druids were considered quirky, on the edge, peculiar, just a little quaint and queer, but maybe innocent enough. To some we were considered lunatic fringe, hippies, strange folk in long gowns, whereas in the last few years the perception has swung more from lunatic fringe to maybe just a little fringe. Here in Wales things have changed even more. Druids have long been associated with Wales, and each August the Druids of the Gorsedd of Bards of the Isle of Britain take to their ceremonial function within the National Eisteddfod of Wales. Druids are familiar, we know what they look like, sound like, and we are quite accustomed to them. 


However the cultural Druids of the Gorsedd are different to Pagan Druids, but we do share several things in common - a common birth, from the imagination of the Romantic revivalists, a love of land, a love of language and heritage, a love of creative expression, and the love of Awen. Tell someone in Wales that you are a Druid and the likelihood is the response will be - "Oh so you sing then?". And yet the perception can be quite different just across that invisible line that divides England and Wales. But, Wales' association with Druids has made it easier to be a Druid in Wales, and for the ordinary Welsh person to adapt to the new Pagan Druids that are sweeping the nation. 

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Minoan Midsummer: Layers of Religion

Religion isn’t a static thing. We don’t invent a religion once and leave it as is for centuries. Cultures change, people change, and spiritual practice changes, too.

Minoan civilization lasted for centuries. Just the “palace” periods, the times when the big temple complexes were being built and rebuilt, lasted about 500 years. Minoan civilization as a whole lasted more than two millennia. And during that time, the spiritual practice in ancient Crete changed and grew.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Adorn the Dead with Roses

(image: Two hands in black and white cupping the bloom of a deep red rose)

I had tentatively started a post on the Roman months of May and June being filled with rose festivals and how the adornment of roses and violets marked both life and death in the Roman world during the months of May through mid-July. I was mentally filling this essay with how we could all stop to honor our Beloved Dead in the summer with roses and all the historical bits I could yank out of my tumbling, sometimes foggy mind.

And then on June 12th, while I drank my coffee, the news filtered in that there had been a mass shooting in Orlando.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
The Colors of Minoan Life and Art

The Minoans loved color. The vibrant colors are usually the first thing people notice about Minoan art; the second thing they notice is how natural and realistic much of it is. That naturalism and realism might lead people to wonder about some of the color conventions in Minoan art. So much of Minoan art is realistic, it's kind of jarring when something is the wrong color.

If you have a look at the Bull Leaper fresco at the top of this post, you'll see that the two athletes to the right and left have white skin (not a natural Caucasian peachy color or a natural light tan, but literally white). The central bull leaper is a deep reddish tan, like a bad sunburn. This is due to a set of rules in Minoan art that says women always have white skin and men always have reddish tan skin. If you've ever had a look at Egyptian art, you'll see something similar there: The men always have reddish tan skin and the women always have yellow skin (with a few special exceptions like Osiris, who occasionally appears green because mythology).

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Back to Basics

Greetings! Since my last post, I have been installed as Archdruid at ADF and it has been a busy six weeks. There has been a lot of discussion about what ADF is and what ADF isn't, so I thought I would go back to basics and discuss, over a series of posts, the Vision of our Founder (or Flounder depending upon your point of view) Isaac Bonewits.

I think it is safe to say that Isaac was a visionary, and his thoughts on Neo-paganism are as valid today as they were when they were first uttered three decades ago. I adhere to Isaac's vision and I think it is the organizational foundation for what ADF is today and will be going into the future.

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