Pagan Paths


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Paths Blogs

Specific paths such as Heathenism, blended traditions, polytheist reconstructionism, etc.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

I’m going to take a break from the physical descriptions of structures at White Mountain Druid Sanctuary and talk some about possible personal experiences there.  Part of what is really exciting about modern paganism is that there is not usually much tradition or dogma about how one should believe.  In ADF, we focus on practice - do rituals whether public or solitary.  Bring the mind’s attention in line with the Kindreds.  We have a specific structure to our rituals with 18 core points to hit.  However, this is the limit of the structure.  In other words, what you experience in your own mind and heart is your business.

 

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Comparison of Heathen and Romani Spiritual Words Part 2: Chaos and Cosmos

Comparison of Heathen and Romani Spiritual Words and Concepts

Part 2: Chaos, Cosmos, and the Nature of Time

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    A decade or so ago I go a video game called Xenosaga. One of the characters was a tall android woman named Kosmos. Another chara
Minoan Shields: Shamanic Tool of the Kouretes?

The figure-eight shield that shows up in Minoan and Mycenaean art is endlessly fascinating and has inspired a broad range of theories as to its religious and military significance. You can see above part of the reconstructed Shield fresco from the Minoan temple complex at Knossos; the figure-eight shield also appears on Minoan seals and seal impressions as well as a fresco from the Mycenaean palace at Tiryns. The seals and seal impressions combine the figure-eight shield with other images from Minoan religion and nature, like these:

 

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Comparison of Heathen and Romani Spiritual Words Part 1: the Soul

Comparison of Heathen and Romani Spiritual Words and Concepts

Part 1: the Soul

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b2ap3_thumbnail_cu-chulainn-in-battle.jpg

1. Not listening to women is dumb, and sets you up for a world of pain. (Don't ignore the young female druid / seidhkona... you get the picture).

2. Stupidity (and hubris) are equal opportunity. It's Queen Maeve who ignores the warning from the wisewoman Fedelm. It's the men following her who compound it. It's Maeve's husband who insults her enough to make her start the war Fedelm knows will be a blood bath. And it's Cu Chulainn who keeps on going despite the goddess Morrigan placing herself directly in his path and warning him of his violent death.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Columbine/Aquilegia magic

Columbine/Aquilegia

(Aquilegia Canadensis, Aquilegia vulgaris)

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Dividing the Minoan World

We divide our world into all sorts of segments based on time and space: day and night; the four seasons; the ground, the air, and space. Organizing the world into understandable parts is a natural human inclination, and the Minoans did it, just like everyone else. So how did they divide their world?

I have a few ideas. The most obvious is the seasons. Crete lies in the sea just south of Greece and has a Mediterranean climate. That means that, instead of the spring-summer-autumn-winter cadence we're used to in most of North America and Europe, the year flows from the rainy season to the dry season and back again: only two major seasonal divisions. In Mediterranean climates, the dry season lasts from what we might call late spring, through summer, and into early autumn. On Crete, plant life turns crispy-brown and dry. All but the largest creeks dry up, and even the rivers diminish to a flow much smaller than their wet season. This is the dead time of year, the counterpart to winter in the northern temperate zone.

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