Lokean Swamp Witch: Trickster-Induced Mysticism and Mayhem

Diary of a Lokean mystic.

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Heather Freysdottir

Heather Freysdottir

Lokean nun, writer, swamp witch. Heather is a Pagan monastic, writer, editor, and mother. She has written and edited for a variety of publications and social media, including science journals, romance novels, and technology blogs. She also holds degrees in education and speech-language pathology, and has a passion for historical linguistics.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

I was gonna kick off my month for Pop with a more general post on how awesome He is, but I came across this on the blogosphere, and I wanted to quote it, because the blog it's from is about health at any size.

"When I started out, I felt like I should post every comment that wasn’t just overt spam.   I believed that it was somehow cowardly to not post hater comments.  I have since changed my mind – I work hard to put out good information on this blog and develop a readership and I don’t have to hand that forum over to a hater to prove anything.  People are allowed to behave like idiots but I’m under no obligation to give them a place to do so."

via How to Handle a Hater | Dances With Fat.

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Questions on Pagan Monasticism

I'm writing today about Pagan monasticism, for a couple of reasons, one being that a colleague in my study group asked about how you can tell whether you’re called to clergy as a monastic, particularly as opposed to being a priest or priestess. The other reason I'm writing about it is because many Pagans are not aware that monasticism is a vocation in our faith, and certainly even fewer people outside Paganism.

“While in common usage the terms "nun" and "Sister" are often used interchangeably (the same title of "Sister" for the individual member of both forms), they are considered different ways of life, with a "nun" being a religious woman who lives a contemplative and cloistered life of meditation and prayer for the salvation of others, while a "Religious Sister", in religious institutes like Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity, lives an active vocation of both prayer and service, often to the needy, sick, poor, and uneducated.”  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nun

I can’t find the same sort of reference for the difference between “priest” and “monk,” although I suspect it’s somewhat similar. It’s been a long time since I formally studied Catholic doctrine. However, I’d also say that in Paganism, the lines are a bit fuzzier in terms of monasticism. If we were using the strict Catholic definitions, I’m somewhere between a nun and a Sister – I have a large amount of most of my days dedicated to contemplative study, prayer, and meditation, but I also do a lot of community work online and in person. This is why I have “free-range nun” listed as my occupation. It’s sort of tongue-in-cheek, but it’s accurate.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
“Flame consumes my sorrow Reborn I am as art The jewel of selfhood blazes In my crowned and conquering heart.”

- Sharon Knight & T. Thorn Coyle, “Alchemy,” Songs for the Strengthening Sun

“You got to understand the god thing. It’s not magic. It’s about being you, but the you that people believe in. It’s about being the concentrated, magnified, essence of you. It’s about becoming thunder, or the power of a running horse, or wisdom. You take all the belief and become bigger, cooler, more than human. You crystallize.”  Neil GaimanAmerican Gods

Self is undoubtedly one of the more problematic topics for Him to ask me to write about, because in reality, I am more reserved than y’all think. “You’re easy to know, but not easy to know well,” He has said to me more than once. I had mixed feelings about writing about myself during a devotional month for Him, but this is what He wants – more than words or gestures, Loki wants me to know myself and be that, without shame or fear, and that kind of nakedness is the hardest thing for me to do, let alone to share publicly.

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  • Christine L Berger
    Christine L Berger says #
    I love this. The thing about being naked is that it allows those that you share with to be the same. That is a gift that you giv

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
"The point of Pride is our recognition of our own self-worth and the ability to live fully without reservation, allowing our true nature to shine outward while not giving in to the ego's temptation to compare ourselves to others. It is complete innocence, living fully and unabashedly in the moment." -Storm Faerywolf, on the Iron Pentacle

"Pride emerges when our will is engaged and we stand upright in our truth. We are often misinformed about what pride is. What is called “pride” in our culture is often merely arrogance, or what I call 'false pride.' Arrogance has its flip side in self-depreciation, which is just another face of the arrogant posture." - T. Thorn Coyle, Evolutionary Witchcraft

In today’s edition of Let’s Use the Iron Pentacle to Unpack What Binds You, I proudly (ha!) present: pride. It’s a loaded word, and often used unkindly against others. For my own unpacking purposes, I’ll talk about pride in my accomplishments, because ideally, we should be proud of them, no matter what they are, and saying, “Hey I’m proud that I accomplished this thing,” shouldn’t immediately cause someone else to infer, “I did this, you didn’t, neener neener.”

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
"In our culture, sex is tricky. It is glorified in strange and twisted ways, yet simultaneously swept under the rug." - T. Thorn Coyle, Evolutionary Witchcraft

Today I want to talk about sex, because I don't think I've ever done so on this blog.  Sex, particularly of the godsexy variety is both taboo and commonplace in mystic circles - you can have it, you can talk about it from behind closed doors, but in public, the reaction is mixed from tolerated to frowned on to outright hostility, particularly if the sex is talked about in any kind of detail or is something other than het or vanilla. Sometimes people explain it as an energetic exchange, which I've always found curious in that I always think, "what do you guys think sex with a fellow human is?" And then there's the mythos of interested in sex= fangirl, which I also despise, because I find it to be borderline sl*t shaming.

You guys have no idea how many of the deeper mystery lessons that I've written about in my blog that were delivered during or right after sex (hint: all of them). This does not mean that all Loki and I do is have sex, but I also feel like it's disingenuous sometimes to not talk about sex with Him, because we do workings together regularly.  I also probably share less of that stuff because of the circumstances of how it's delivered. I'm not immune to sex-shaming, either.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Beth Lynch
    Beth Lynch says #
    Both of these points are spot-on. I also try to keep my blog PG-friendly and at least open to the possibility of inter-faith conv
  • Heather Freysdottir
    Heather Freysdottir says #
    Agreed. The other thought I have about this is that I'm aware that children read my blog - children younger than my own teenager,
  • Beth Lynch
    Beth Lynch says #
    Which is important, and as someone comment to your blog, if there weren't those of us out there being open about our god-marriages
  • Heather Freysdottir
    Heather Freysdottir says #
    "...sex with a god ... is a Mystery. If you haven't experienced it, no amount of reading about somebody else's experiences is goin
  • Beth Lynch
    Beth Lynch says #
    Well I, for one, don't have sex with Loki, nor do I want to. (True story.) However, I DO have sex with Odin, in ways that range

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Or, why UPG is personal, and why no one else's gnosis should get in the way of your relationship with Himself.

Loki is many things - charismatic, cunning, ruthless, loyal, loving. When I was a newer Lokean (yanno, still had the new car smell!), I used to worry that the sweet Husband that I had was somehow a false Loki or a sockpuppet or whatever godphone error. Over time, I've come to realize that it's not that someone else is wrong about Loki being harsh to them, or that I'm wrong in understanding His relationship with me, it's just that I'm not living with their Loki, and they're not living with mine. I suppose some of my feelings on Him are colored by perspective - it's not as if I've never been asked to do something hard - I left my mortal spouse, uprooted my child, lost a fair amount of zie's childhood pictures and keepsakes, many of which I'll never be able to replace, but the reason why He asked it of me was of Nyd, and still done out of love, so I can't truly be angry with Him or feel it unjust.

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  • Naya Aerodiode
    Naya Aerodiode says #
    There is room enough in the world for everyone's paradigm.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Fun fact about me: I have a degree in speech-language pathology, and my concentration was in clinical phonology with a heavy emphasis on linguistics. I love studying the sound systems of a language and how sounds are tied to meaning. Today I happened across Forvo, a linguistic site that specializes in using native speakers to demonstrate how to pronounce words. It is single words and not sentences, but it's still helpful in developing an ear for nonnative speakers.

Of course, Forvo has a list of Norse mythology terms and many other languages as well. I hope that resources such as this will help preserve and protect against linguistic extinction. Every language has its own way of expressing a view of the world, and the language we speak undoubtedly shapes the way we think about everything in the inner and outer world. As Pagans we are explorers of other worlds, and so preservation of language is as precious as any other resource.

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