Originally a forest dweller, Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus) now roosts in attics. Moreover, He makes his home in the eaves of people’s houses. Seen around city traffic lights, Big Brown Bat hunts for Insects along the tree-lined streets. He has maternity roosts in bridges, and eats the bugs attracted there by the headlights of cars.

Found in the Americas, Big Brown Bat tolerates the cold by hibernating during the winter. He can be found sleeping in tunnels and abandoned mine shafts. Unlike other Bats, Big Brown Bat lives for as long as 18 years. Biologists believe that his hibernation is the major reason for his long life. Also, his relatively large size allows Him to remain active in cooler weather.

Beneficial to people, Big Brown Bat eats as many as 1,200 Insects in one hour. Flying in a stately, unwavering manner, He is an agile hunter, trapping Moths by throwing his wings around Them like a net. Although, He is still abundant, his numbers are decreasing yearly.

Although harmless to people, Big Brown Bat is often killed by chemical wood preservers that humans apply to their house rafters. Moreover, people view him as a pest. However, instead of killing this Bat, people should be happy that He is there combating insect pests.

 As a part of human-bat relations, put up bat-specific artificial roosts nearby your home. This will give Big Brown Bat a safe home and help to keep the insect populations down. Other ways of helping Him is to encourage farmers to have Maternity Colonies on their property or help in Bat conservation efforts. Encourage engineers to design bridges for Big Brown Bat to safely roost in with his Pups.

Big Brown Bat teaches knowing the inadvertent consequences of your actions. He only wants to eat harmful Insects, not die by unthinking people who use chemicals in their homes. Remember to measure and weigh your actions before doing anything. As for Big Brown Bat, construct bat houses for Him to live in.

Wisdom of Big Brown Bat:
Helpfulness
Living in Harmony
Finding Your Niche in Life

Conservation Note: White Nose Syndrome has decimated bat colonies in North America. Governments and scientists are working on inoculating the remaining populations.

More information on bat conservation: Bat Conservation International

http://www.batcon.org/index.php

My posts on bats can be found here: Bat Family: Facing The Shadows , Fruit Bats (Flying Foxes): Know What is Important