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PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Thirteen Towers of the Horned One

Stretching across Asia, from North Manchuria, through Tibet, west through Persia, and ending in the Kurdistan, was a chain of seven towers on isolated mountaintops; and in each one of these towers sat continuously a priest of Satan, who by "broadcasting" occult vibrations controlled the destinies of the world for evil. 

William B. Seabrook, Adventures in Arabia

In 1927, gonzo journalist William Seabrook became the first to write about the "Seven Towers of Satan," by which the priesthood of the Yazidis, the People of the Peacock Angel, secretly controlled the world.

So that explains it.

Seabrook's towers were fiction, but hey: a good idea is a good idea.

The Thirteen Towers of the Horned One.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Apologies for the long hiatus in posting here at Broomstix on Pagansquare. Like most folks, I (Natalie) found 2016 to be a bit of a challenging year--in good ways, and... some not so good ways. Many good things happened, for me, particularly, the release of Magical Destinations of the Northeast in October was a high point, but it was bittersweet. I lost several family members and friends in 2016, including two beloved mentors, one of my contributors to Magical Destinations of the Northeast, and my Aunt Vinnie and Uncle John... It seems that everyone has had something last year. LAST, being the operative word.

So here's what's happening at broomstix ♥ The Broomstix Blog at Blogspot is finally being shaped into the archive I envisioned. I'm currently in the process of sorting all of the material by category, and where possible by sabbat and season. Have a look at the TAROT page which features Claire Cunnington's very cool tutorial, illustrated with Robin Ator's Ator Tarot, all together and complete for the first time!

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Rhymes with 'Art'

The ancestors were practical people.

When linguists discovered that, by comparing words from daughter languages, they could reconstruct a vocabulary for a language from some 6000 years ago, predating the invention of writing, they were ecstatic.

In our understanding of the past, archaeological artifacts will take us only so far. To really understand how a culture thinks, we need to know what it says.

To the scholarly world's everlasting disappointment, what we can reconstruct of the Proto-Indo-European language really tells us very little about the ancestors' society, culture, or religion.

What we do know is that they had two words for, shall we say, “breaking wind.”

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Series Title: The Gryphonpike Chronicles

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Voluntary Simplicity

 2017 is going to be the year where hopefully the words “voluntary simplicity” will be embraced by a wider range of people. I know that I have been incorporating voluntary simplicity in my own life for many years now, and that there is still many more ways in which I can follow a simpler, more efficient and ecologically sustainable way of being in the world. To do so, I am constantly informing myself, being conscious and mindful, trying to look at the bigger picture and taking personal responsibility for the world that I am leaving to our ancestors of the future. Now more than ever, we are at the crucial tipping point where we have to look beyond our own self-interest and look to the whole, to be more holistic in everything that we do.  

I have incorporated Zen and Buddhism into my life for many years. For me, this brings a wisdom from both Eastern and Western philosophies that can blend together to form a holistic worldview and way of life. I feel that East and West need each other in order to understand the whole. Only when we understand the material as well as the spiritual can we bring them together to live fully in the here and now.  

It’s important that simplicity, in terms of reducing consumerism, resources and living a better, cleaner more sustainable life, is voluntarily chosen. When it is not, we come across such suffering as poverty. Many people in the world do not have a choice to reduce, reuse, to choose. Here in the West, many of us can make choices, however small, in our daily lives that strive towards a more sustainable future for everyone. Where we can, we should voluntarily make that choice, in order to preserve a future for humanity. In doing so, we will also achieve a higher quality of life, and be able to truly flourish as a species. We are at that balance point, if we haven’t already gone too far, to either evolve into a higher consciousness and have that reflected in our actions, to come together as we realise that there is more to bind us together than tear us apart, or we can fall into divisiveness, fighting each other over the few differences and destroying not only ourselves, but a large portion of life on this planet in our downfall.  

But what is simplicity? It is living in harmony with the world. Druidry is all about relationship, and this is also at the heart of simplicity. It is egalitarian. It sees through the illusions created by modern-day culture and society, the need to consume, the distractions of the media. It is about seeing what is really important in life: your family, your friends, your local environment. It is about living sustainably, so that our children and their children, as well as all the planet’s children, both human and non-human, have a good quality of life. It is about learning what is enough, rather than striving for more.  

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Can You Still Be a Heathen If You Don't Like Mead?

So: I'd like your opinion on a theological matter of some importance.

I know it sounds like a joke, but it isn't really.

I don't like mead. I've never met a mead I liked.

I'd rather drink bad beer than drink good mead.

I'd rather drink water than drink mead.

Hell: I'd rather drink goat piss than drink mead.

(Insofar there's any appreciable difference between the two, anyway.)

So, can I still be heathen?

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Mab Nahash
    Mab Nahash says #
    I'm interested in the question Chris raised. Each time I try to fill in that blank of the sine qua non of a witch, I find someone
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I like to think that flexibility is inherent in polytheism: a world in which there's nearly always another option!
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    Lots of Asatru kindreds provide an alternative beverage for non-drinkers. Sometimes there are two horns, with with alcohol and one
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    From my personnel perspective I hate being told "You've got to do this if you want to be that" or "You can't do that if you want t
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Gods, ya gotta love the Lore. "Turn it and turn it, for everything is in it." Well, that's quite a conundrum you pose there, sir,

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Who Do You Swear By?

Just before the last presidential inauguration, a petition made the rounds requesting that language referring to “God” be dropped from the presidential oath.

Me, I didn't sign it.

I think it's right and good that those entering public office should swear by the gods that they honor. It's a time-honored old pagan tradition.

But to each, his own gods. When the time comes—hasten, O hasten, the day—that it's a pagan taking that presidential oath, I want to hear those pagan gods called to witness.

Then I'll die happy.

Who among your gods witnesses oaths? Who would you swear by, if you were taking the oath of office tomorrow?

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