PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Recent blog posts
Empowerment, Healing and Letting Go

When I first started along the healing path, empowerment was the goal. I wandered towards it without guidance. I was just like Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz clicking my heels together and closing my eyes tight wishing with all my might that I would learn to feel confident and safe in my skin. It was a matter of trial and error really. Some things I tried brought short-term gains while other things were downright failures.

I tried aligning myself with powerful, confident people. Mostly I feel better when I was in their company and their favor. It was sometimes heart wrenching to be so dependent on someone else, but I did pick up a few tools by mimicking their behavior. 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Those Pesky Satanic Verses

Among the preeminent deities of ancient Arabia were the Triple Goddesses of Mecca: al-Lât, al-'Uzzá, and Manât. We don't know much about them—the mosque far out-did the church in ruthlessness when it came to destruction of the past—but they certainly did cause problems for Muhammad. And, in fact, they still do.

When Muhammad had gained enough power to become a player in local politics, grandees from some of Mecca's most prestigious families came to him and said: “Look, make a place in your system for the Three Goddesses—they don't have to be on top, just make a place for them—and we'll back you.”

Muhammad was well-known for having self-serving revelations. His wife 'A'isha once remarked that it sure was convenient how Allah seemed to back him in every argument. So he goes up to Mount Nûr and, lo and behold, the angel Jibrîl whispers into his ear:

Have you seen al-Lât and al-'Uzzá,

and Manât, the third, the other?

These are the exalted cranes,

their intercession much to be desired.

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  • Bruno
    Bruno says #
    Clap clap clap!

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
AAR Annual Meeting - V

This blog wants me to post 75 characters, so please click here for full text of blog.

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Pagan News Beagle: Earthy Thursday, March 5

Looking for some earthy, natural remedies? We've got a bunch here at the Pagan News Beagle, including earth-born bacteria and air-cleaning vegetation. Plus, getting in touch with the wild and dealing with climate change.

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Ritual Elements Part Two - Re-igniting the Spark

I've recently finished co-teaching a six week class titled "Elements of Magic". It is one of the core pieces of magic I teach in the Reclaiming Tradition.I revisit this work every so often as a teacher and as a student. In my last post, I talked about my explorations with Air. Now I'm moving into Fire (cue music -The Ohio Players "Fire" )

Re-igniting The Spark -

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Limoncello is a glass of liquid sunshine.  As the light grows and we approach Ostara, the Spring Equinox where the light overtakes the darkness, there is no better drink to celebrate the season.  Sweet, tart, strong, and delicious, a little glass of limoncello is like drinking in the growing sun.

Some pagans make mead, others brew beer, others steep all sorts of fruits in any strong drink they can find.  I make limoncello.  I first learned of limoncello while traveling in Italy.  We were staying in Sorrento, a seaside town with much the same climate as my native southern California.  The local drink was this delicious concoction of local lemons, sugar, water, and booze.  I had to try it.  After I did, I had to find the recipe.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Mandrakes

I'd never met anyone that raises mandrakes before.

Over breakfast one morning at a festival, a couple that do just that were telling a group of us about the process. It's very interesting. Where they live, it's too cold for the mandrakes to over-winter in the ground, so they dig them up every fall and keep them in boxes of sand through the winter. Then in the spring they replant them.

The advantage of all this exhuming and replanting, of course, being that they get to know each of the roots individually, maybe shape them a little, and photograph the mandrakes as they grow. Did we want to see the pictures?

Did we ever.

So there we are, oohing and aahing as the photos circulate. For all the world as if we were looking at pictures of someone's grandchildren: beaming grandparents, admiring circle. Witches and mandrakes.

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  • Soli
    Soli says #
    Well, this is timely. I have been thinking about trying to grow mandrakes myself. Lovely!

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