PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Recent blog posts

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
womenandchildren

This was a blog I wrote a long time ago, before I was introduced to the glorious world of trans. This post applies not just to the plain usage of "Women and children first" but the potential for stripping men (trans or no) of their value and dignity. It also applies to how some practitioners, especially Wiccans, identify womyn with receptivity and passiveness rather than passion and power. Hopefully you find this thought-provoking.

It's August, it's hot, and I'm pissed. Regrettably, only the first two are seasonal.

...
Last modified on
Modern Minoan Paganism Workshop at Mystic South

I had a marvelous time at Mystic South last weekend. I saw some old friends and met some new ones. I also gave a workshop about Modern Minoan Paganism. I never know what to expect when I'm doing public events, but I was happily surprised that so many people were interested - we had to rustle up extra chairs so everyone would have a place to sit (thank you to the Mystic South volunteers and organizers for being so helpful with this!).

Though there were a lot of attendees at the conference, there are also a lot of people who didn't get to come. With that in mind, we recorded the workshop to share online. A big thank you to my daughter, who patiently babysat the equipment while I gave the presentation.

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Garden Spells

Garden spells

You can work magic for all of your plants by charging the water, soil and plant feed with energy. Visualise positive light flowing into it before you use it and perhaps devise some chants to use. Create a chant to say each time you water to bring nourishing energy and growth, and one to use when you plant seeds or seedlings to encourage strong growth.

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Incense Molds

Since I made my first natural incense cone, I have quested for a decent incense mold.  For many years, there was nothing at all on the market.  In those early days, I made my own latex cone mold and taught others how to do it.  Making molds isn’t something I want to devote a lot of time to, so I’ve continued checking and testing virtually every mold I can find anywhere in the world.  My conclusion?

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Why Cloudy Crystals Turn Clear

This week we're going to talk about a question that I get a lot. I decided to make a short blog post out of the answer to help.

Why do cloudy crystals turn clear?

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Virgin Scrying?

Did you know that it was once thought advantageous to use virgins for scrying? While crystal balls are probably the most common form of scrying known now, and maybe second to that mirrors (you probably know John Dee's famous mirror). But other reflective surfaces have been used, including onychomancy (divination by a polished fingernail).

Claire Fanger makes a good argument for the late medieval link between scrying and summoning spirits. While summoning angels and binding demons might appear on the surface to be completely different skill sets or activities, clearly the two are easily linked because of the cosmological outlook both share:

...
Last modified on
Santeria Envy, or: What Do You Say When You Hear Thunder?

Sometimes you can't help but be jealous.

Guillermo was born in Havana, so naturally our conversation eventually turned to Santeria. Like most New Pagans, I've got a pretty pronounced case of Santeria envy.

Guillermo grew up surrounded by the Way of the Saints but doesn't really practice it any more.

“I still find myself saying Eparreí Changó whenever I hear thunder, though,” he said, laughing. “Some things you never lose.”

Oh, those fortunate intact cultures.

What do you say when you hear that first peal (or rumble, or crash) of Thunder in a storm? Certainly it calls for some sort of response. When someone you love and respect calls to you from across the room, do you ignore it and say nothing? Probably not.

In the old days, pretty much all cultures had a healthy respect for the Thunderer. It's hard not to. He's big, he's loud, he's powerful, and we couldn't get along without him. 1400 years ago, the Anglo-Saxon Hwicce—the original Tribe of Witches—called Him Þunor.

We call Him Thunder today. When I first hear His voice, I've taken to greeting Him by Name, along with a vocable: a word without literal meaning that signifies nonetheless.

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Ian Phanes
    Ian Phanes says #
    I say: "Hail, Taranis!"
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Honestly my usual response is: "was that thunder, or did someone crash their truck?"

Additional information