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PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Religious Freedom and Serving in the U.S. Military

There is a battle currently being fought right here on American soil. It isn't with guns or ships or planes, but with people and power dynamics. The current situation at the Great Lakes Naval Training facility is an indicator of this struggle--how and when does the U.S. military allow for the accommodation of religious freedom and expression for its service members.

On April 3, 2015 the commander of Naval Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill enacted a decision to cancel religious services being provided by civilian volunteer clergy on the installation. This decision affected seven minority religious groups, effectively dismantling a web of emotional and spiritual support for the trainees that walk through those gates. The decision was justified and cited to be in line with the naval instruction regulating the use of personnel for religious support by the commander of RTC: “In March of 2014 the RTC Command Religious Program (CRP) began a review of how best to respond to the religious needs of recruits at RTC and whether the command was following the guidance contained in U.S. Navy regulations, which sets a hierarchy for which spiritual leaders should be utilized: command chaplains, accredited uniformed volunteers, contract clergy, and then civilian volunteer, if needed.”[1]

A link to the Navy Times report on this can be found here: http://www.navytimes.com/story/military/2015/04/22/military-religious-freedom-foundation-mikey-weinstein-navy-boot-camp-recruit-training-command/26205131/ 

Several official responses to this decision have already been sent, including a letter from the Military Religious Freedom Foundation (MRFF) and the Chaplain Alliance for Religious Liberty (CARL), claiming the violation of religious liberty rights on behalf of the trainees at RTC.

There is no argument that this decision is in fact a violation of religious liberty rights, but many are asking why the Navy would go to such lengths to deny minority faith groups the resources already in place for expression of their faith. I believe we are on a speeding train heading toward a cliff on this particular issue, and if it is not addressed quickly we will see very ugly consequences.

First and foremost, a discussion needs to be had on the purpose of military chaplains in uniform. I would like to borrow a statement from Ed Waggoner as it concerns a growing trend in chaplain dynamics: “U.S. military chaplaincies are at a crossroad. The bedrock rationale for the existence of chaplaincies is to provide for the free exercise of religion by rank-and-file military personnel. For the first time in their history, a significant contingent of endorsers and chaplains has recanted its professional responsibility to care for all personnel. Gays, lesbians, and bisexuals are entitled to all military benefits, including services provided through the chaplaincies. Chaplains volunteer for military careers of just such service. Unfortunately, some theologically and socially conservative Christian groups now cast themselves as victims of coercion and invert pastoral priorities: they insist that the military protect their religiously motivated refusal to serve all personnel. The chaplaincies are at serious risk of becoming strongholds of religiously defended discrimination rather than generous religious and moral service.”[2]  

Let’s dissect that statement for a moment. Military chaplaincy has been a centrally authorized function since 1775. It can be argued that the socially acceptable form of religious expression was overwhelmingly Abrahamic in nature, and Christian in particular. But as we have seen in the last half a century, alternative forms of spirituality and religious expression have become more mainstream and the U.S. military is a volunteer force of individuals pulled from American society. I feel Mr. Waggoner’s statement is apt (though a bit limited in scope) that the chaplain’s primary function is the support of all military personnel and their emotional and spiritual needs. Now, execution is an entirely different matter. In the civilian world, if your primary care specialist deems you need to see an orthopedist for example, they refer you to someone who deal with that. They don’t tell you you’re wrong for needing orthopedic treatment and try to convince you there is something else going on. This is how chaplaincy is also supposed to work. If a chaplain cannot meet the spiritual needs of a military service member, it falls on that chaplain to make the proper referral to someone who can. Hence, the introduction of civilian lay leaders and volunteers. These programs are essential for complimenting the spiritual outreach and effectiveness of the chaplain corps and actually work against the very argument most chaplains have about performing spiritual practices that are in direct violation of their personal beliefs. Cancelling the services at RTC is not only a clear violation of religious liberties for the trainees, but it puts undue stress on the staff to provide additional support they are either not comfortable or knowledgeable enough to provide. Additionally, we are setting the stage for a rise in possible suicide cases as well as drop outs due to stress and lack of emotional support. I cannot stand by the decision made by RTC, and as of now I do not see a functional reason for why it was made. 

For the resources I used in this post and additional material on military chaplaincy: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0ByAY6igmY7VRfjlUbEFrdHlLNU9CNnh0Nnp2blBtYUJ4cHNfS2xxRk90R0gydXBLMUY2LTQ&usp=sharing 

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Tying a Sacred Knot

Many symbols and images have held sacred meaning within religious traditions around the world and throughout time: the circle, the cross, the pillar, the pentagram. These symbols don’t necessarily mean the same thing in every tradition, and sometimes we can’t even be sure what the original significance was for each culture. One such symbol is the knot. You may be familiar with the tale of the Gordian knot from Greek and Roman mythology (the one Alexander the Great famously sliced with his sword) or the tyet of Isis from Egyptian mythology, often found in the form of amulets but also related to the knot on some Egyptian deities’ garments. But there’s another one you might not have heard of: the Minoan sacral knot. Let’s explore this symbol and see what we can discover about it.

The famed ‘snake goddess’ figurine from Knossos (in the photo at the top of this post) has an object that Sir Arthur Evans identified as a sacral knot between her breasts, at the top of the girdle that encircles her waist. A second ‘snake goddess’ figurine, also found at Knossos, has a similar, though larger, knot between the front edges of her top. I find it interesting that the snakes themselves form a large knot over her lower abdomen. I have to wonder if that has any significance. What do you think? 

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Stepping into your Priestess Self

This is maybe the scariest topic for me- yet somehow I feel ready and eager to move into it. Maybe it's because the nightingales were singing so daringly this morning, or it's the storm raging outside. 

I- am- going- to- intiate- a- woman- into- her- priestess- self. 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Mess in Texas

So: a hate group in Texas mounts an art show featuring cartoons of the Muslim prophet.

At the urging of a local imam, the local Muslim community decides to respond with silence. No one pickets, blogs, editorializes, or writes about it in the press. No one does anything whatsoever to give the show any publicity.

An expatriate American who has gone to Syria to fight for the So-Called So-Called spreads word of the show on the web, urging retaliation.

Two Muslim converts from another state drive to Texas, wound a security guard, and are themselves killed. “Allah, accept your mujahideen,” one tweets.

The So-Called So-Called claims responsibility.

As one who strives to live in accordance with the thews (virtues) of the ancestors, I ask myself:

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PaganNewsBeagle Fiery Tuesday May 5

In today's PaganNewsBeagle we bring attention to the ways in which political action and Pagan culture intersect: sometimes easily, other times with a fair degree of dissonance and friction. We've got anti-capitalist May Day history tied into Beltane; racism in the Pagan community; a test (are you racist?) for the brave; BlackWitch on Baltimore, and HecateDemeter undermining the patriarchy as only she can.

Gods&Radicals blogger Rhyd Wildermuth points out that the intersection between the wild Pagan holiday of Beltane and the anti-capitalist holiday of May Day is hardly coincidental in this post on the Wild Hunt.

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My Dear Fellow Empaths,

I know it can seem overwhelming to live in a world with so much cruelty and violence. Especially when you're so sensitive that your heart breaks for even the most passing challenging emotions experienced by your fellow creatures...I feel your pain--literally! Because I'm an empath too.

But it's important that we learn to overcome emotional paralysis and live fully in this world. Not just with tolerance, but with actual joy.

Why? Well, first, because we're here anyway so we might as well make the most of it. But on a grander scale, consciousness is contagious, and compassion transforms challenges into blessings. So our fellow humans, animals, and plants need nothing more at this particular time than for us to spread our compassionate and loving state of being.

That's why I thought I'd share the three main things I've learned about living comfortably in this modern world.

First, it's important that we recognize that our empathy is a gift, not a curse. Yes, it can be overwhelming at times, but our capacity for grief is exactly equal to our capacity for transcendence. The very sensitivity that can pierce our hearts with excruciating pain can also elevate our consciousness to the realm of the miraculous. Would we willingly renounce our ability to connect with other creatures at the deepest of levels, or to see infinity in a raindrop? Never. I'll take excruciating emotion over a more mundane, less painful level of consciousness any day.

Second, it's important that we clear, shield, and recharge our energy field on a regular basis. Employing the gift of empathy effectively and sustainably requires that we wield our power consciously. This way, we can recognize what feelings are coming from us, and what feelings are coming from others. And, we can shift feelings in a positive way rather than letting ourselves get bogged down in the negative. To do this, we must clear and shield our auras regularly and be sure to recharge our energy fields by spending time in nature, taking sea salt baths, and devoting plenty of time to rest, play, and loving self-care.

Third, it's important that we use our superpower for good. Once we follow the two guidelines above, we are empowered to shift the overall energy of the planet to greater harmony, rather than letting it shift us into greater discord. And doing so regularly takes us from a place of overwhelm to a place of joy. We no longer feel buffeted about by the negativity in the world and instead notice the ever-increasing positive. Yes, we will still feel the pain of others and even weep from the depths of our soul on occasion, but it will be different. Because we will know that we are an important piece of the growing wave of energy that is even now transforming cruelty into compassion, and violence into peace.

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  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    It is so important for we empaths to have perspective on our talents and tools to deal with them!

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Share the Freedom

Today we celebrate in Netherlands 70 years of freedom, On this day 70 years ago the World war II ended in Netherlands. How do you celebrate your freedom today?

I will be celebrating by taking full access to everything there is- whatever that is. Especially my connection with Gaia. There is that much more beauty, more light, more energy available! For me freedom is taking access to all of that.

It starts with my connection to Mother Earth. Allowing it to bloom to it’s full potential. The life energy will surge. Allow my ego to surrender, allow the ecstacy of deep unconditional connection. Will you join me?

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