PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Recent blog posts

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Mandrakes

I'd never met anyone that raises mandrakes before.

Over breakfast one morning at a festival, a couple that do just that were telling a group of us about the process. It's very interesting. Where they live, it's too cold for the mandrakes to over-winter in the ground, so they dig them up every fall and keep them in boxes of sand through the winter. Then in the spring they replant them.

The advantage of all this exhuming and replanting, of course, being that they get to know each of the roots individually, maybe shape them a little, and photograph the mandrakes as they grow. Did we want to see the pictures?

Did we ever.

So there we are, oohing and aahing as the photos circulate. For all the world as if we were looking at pictures of someone's grandchildren: beaming grandparents, admiring circle. Witches and mandrakes.

Last modified on

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Celebrating Ostara

American Asatru has a major holiday that does not exist in Icelandic Asatru, which is Ostara. Ostara is the heathen and pagan Easter. Because Easter is a major cultural holiday in the USA, with many holiday traditions in which people of all faiths participate, it has also become a major holiday among many American pagans and heathens. Like many of the seemingly secular traditions surrounding Christian holidays, Easter has pagan roots. 

Ostara is the Germanic spelling of Eostre, the English goddess name that developed into the word Easter. A goddess of spring and dawn, Ostara's sphere of influence is the fertility of animals, as exemplified by the fertility symbols the bunny and the egg. The holiday of Ostara can be celebrated on the Spring Equinox, or for a few weeks after. The American secular holiday tradition of hiding dyed chicken eggs and then having the children hunt for them replicates the way real farmers hunt for the eggs of free range chickens. 

The Easter Egg symbol is used in different ways by different individual heathens and pagans and by different heathen and pagan groups. Some families do the traditional American Easter Egg Hunt for their children. Like other Americans and some Europeans, they might dye or decorate the eggs at home, a project in which children can participate. Others buy candies in the shape of eggs, chicks, and bunnies as substitutes for the real thing.

Some kindreds fill blown eggs with confetti and break them on each other's heads to bless each other. There was a group in California that had an annual Ostara campout at which eggs and nickels were placed in a replica Viking longship, and the boat was set on fire and launched into the Pacific Ocean as a sacrifice to the sea goddess, Ran. 

Find out more about American holidays in my book American Celebration: http://www.amazon.com/American-Celebration-Erin-Lale/dp/1304916138/ref=la_B004GLACQQ_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1425318146&sr=1-3

Last modified on
PaganNewsBeagle Wednesday Community News March 4

Lots of fun community news in today's Watery Wednesday edition of the Pagan News Beagle. Paganicon guest Lupa; a new Druid college; staying well at festivals; Morning Glory Zell (Memorial Foundation) news; Between the Worlds.

Upcoming Paganicon guest Lupa Greenwolf is featured in this interview by PNB-Minnesota chapter.

Interested in becoming a druid? This new three-year apprenticeship program by the Druid College might be of interest.

...
Last modified on
New Findings Confirm Folk Wisdom About Broken Glass

AP: Minneapolis, Minnesota

Think back to the last time that you broke a glass on the kitchen floor. Did it seem to you at the time that you swept up more glass than could possibly have been in the glass before you broke it?

Well, it turns out that you were right.

According to Dr. Martin Summerton, Professor of Applied Theurgics at the University of Paganistan's prestigious Department of Thaumatology, carefully-controlled experiments demonstrate that breaking a glass actually does increase its weight.

“If you weigh a glass, break it, and re-weigh every shard from the broken glass, the overall weight of glass increases by approximately 12.3%,” reports Summerton. “Apparently the old folk wisdom is correct.”

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I thought of saving it for April 1. Ah, life on the cutting edge!
  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    Someone is pullng your leg, or you are trying to pull ours.
  • Anne Newkirk Niven
    Anne Newkirk Niven says #
    I hope that "the Onion" doesn't scoop you up for your razor-sharp wit, Steven!

Yule, Imbolc, Ostara, Beltain, Litha, Lammas, Mabon--the eight points in the year that we stop and celebrate the seasons. In the six to eight weeks between each Sabbat, changes have been taking place--some so subtle that you might not be aware of them. The nights get longer--or shorter--by only a minute each day. The weather warms up, or cools down. One of the things that the Sabbats call us to do is to stop and look at the changes that have taken place. It's a time to regroup, reflect, and plan ahead. So in addition to the celebrations, family traditions and seasonal crafts, it's a good idea to spend some time grounding or balancing yourself to deal with the season that's coming up. It's not hard to do. It just takes a little time, a little quiet, and some concentration.

In about two and a half weeks we'll arrive at the Spring Equinox. It's time for those things that were stirring to life at Imbolc to "spring" up--thanks to a warmer environment and nurturing Spring rain. The element of water is considered by many people to be the mother of us all. Think about it. Life started in the sea. And what about you? You floated around in your mom's tum for months, breathing, eating, and growing in water. About 80% of the human body is made of water! People really feel it when water is missing in their lives. Periods without rain--droughts--can cause failed crops and wildfires (we've seen that in the past year in Australia, and over here in the state of California). But just like everything else, balance is essential. Too much water kills plants, animals and people. Flooded areas can breed danger and disease. Remember Hurricane Katrina? That happened several years ago, but the people of New Orleans are still recovering from an overdose of water.

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_kvitebj-rn-kong-valemon-1912.jpg

Lithuanians tell of
Giltine, the death goddess
Long nose, even longer tongue
dripping deadly venom
Clad in a white sheet
Found in cemeteries
seeking coffins’ contents
her poison’s source
She bites, strangles, suffocates 
a million ways to die
Giltine knows no obstacles
fences mean nothing
doors open themselves
She’s an unseen shadow
but you will hear her whip
cracking thrice in the air
or the clatter of her bone rattle
Feel a sudden shiver
She’s looked you in the face
and moved on…this time
Though a Patroness of healers
do not interfere with her will
tricking her is possible
but all measures are temporary
She will come for you
There is no escaping fate
Look where she stands
to know thy future
foot of the bed, recovery
head of the bed
say your prayers
your life is done.

...
Last modified on
Video shared by on in Studies Blogs

Ok everyone, with the help of my lovely and talented boyfriend, I made ... something. I thought it would be fun to start a vlog on pagan subjects. By doing this, Im probably (ultimately) going to invite internet trolls and fiery internet pagans into my life to either ridicule or inform me what Im saying is wrong, but as my mormon mother would say, "to hell with it!" 

I wanted to make something informative, but funny and edgy. I figured I would start out simple, a book review/report. I went with Ronald Huttons Triumph of The Moon because its (somewhat) a respected authority on the topic of contemporary paganism/wicca/witchcraft. Its been up for one day and Iv allready been so graciously informed that my book choice was less than stellar and that I should have chosen a different book. The winds of change and opportunity are swift. 

...
Last modified on

Additional information