Day Star and Whirling Wheel: Honoring the Sun and Moon in the Northern Tradition

Day Star and Whirling Wheel: Honoring the Sun and Moon in the Northern Tradition
Galina Krasskova, Asphodel Press 2009 http://asphodelpress.com/devotionals.html

4/5 Broomsticks

This book is a compilation of personal meditations and sacred poetry for the northern gods of the Sun and Moon.

It is a deeply powerful book, one that shares the worshipers of these gods’ memories and blessings with an honesty and connection that calls from the pages.

The book opens with introductions to both Mani, then Sunna through the author’s experience of them. A true devotional, it is sourced from the ritual and ecstatic experience of the author, rather than strictly in lore or tradition, so, like pretty much the entire backlist of the publisher, your evaluation of this specific book is likely to depend on your stance about the use of personal gnosis in guiding Heathen/Northern practice.

In my slowly-growing relationship with Mani, I have referred to this book’s prayers many times. Many are unusually beautiful, such as “Evening Prayer to Mani”, a simple, petitionary prayer, asking for Mani to help take away the weariness and toil of the day, and asking for His blessing in kind. Many of the prayers are like this one: simple, evocative, and impactful.

One of the many joys of reading a book like this is seeing the breadth of how a God or Goddess can be celebrated, such as the Jubilee recipe for Mani on page 35, or the use of prayer beads on page 37. This book also remembers and honors the family of Mundilfari, the family that Mani and Sunna come from, and there are rituals and prayers involving all of Them, such as Sophie Reicher’s “The Four Adorations” or Moonsinger’s “A Prayer to the Turner of Time.” The drawing together of this whole mythological family is unique; even the Twilight is honored. I have seen this done nowhere else, and it is done with reverence and honor here.

The third part of the book starts with an account of Sunna by Raven Kaldera, who explores Her as a Goddess of Greenwights and plants. He explores our damaged relationship with Her, while showing the way to a better, healing one, where we restore the balance of respect and adoration for this life-giver. As in the section with Mani, Sunna has a section where ways to honor Her are broken down simply for the reader to take into their daily practice.

As with Mani’s section, this section is filled with gorgeous poems and simple, affectionate prayers to Sunna and recipes for different foods for Her and devotional pieces oriented around Her for different times of the day. The book ends with a Yule ritual to Her honoring Her by calling to Her as Hope and Rebirth.

This book has become part of my own devotional work with these Gods, and has helped further my relationship with both Sunna and Mani. Whether you are new to the Northern path, or looking to connect with these Gods, this book is both an excellent guide and devotional piece.

The book opens with introductions to both Mani, then Sunna through the author’s experience of Them. A true devotional, it is sourced from the ritual and ecstatic experience of the author, rather than strictly in lore or tradition, so, like pretty much the entire backlist of the publisher, your evaluation of this specific book is likely to depend on your stance about the use of personal gnosis in guiding Heathen/Northern practice.

Timothy Schneider

Witches&Pagans #24 - Heathen & Northern Traditions


 

 

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