Pagan Spirit Gathering


 © 2008 photos.com

Pagan Spirit Gathering:
a Three Ring Circus Just for Us
by A. C. Fisher Aldaag

Combine a Fourth of July parade, a three-ring circus, an old-fashioned drive-in movie theatre, and a Renaissance fair, you’ll have some idea of what Pagan Spirit Gathering is about. Add a liberal sprinkling of fairy dust, some moonbeams and rainbows, and, well, you get the picture. It is simply impossible to get bored at PSG. Overwhelmed, yes; amazed, definitely; needing to kneel in the red clay Ohio mud and ground out the intense surge of magickal energy, more than likely. But you’ll never, ever get bored.

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10 Tips for Enjoying Your Summer Festival Experience


 © 2008 photos.com

10 Tips for Enjoying Your
Summer Festival Experience
by Bronwen Forbes

As you read this, North America is in the throes of Pagan Festival Season, and a lot of people who are new to Paganism, new to the Pagan festival scene, or both, are packing up their ritual finery, camping gear, myrrh beads, altar cloths, tent banners, and organic bug spray and heading out the door to commune with their people in the bosom of Nature for a weekend – or even a week.

This sounds a lot easier than it is. If my experience is any indication, surviving your first Pagan festival with your psyche, your body, your spiritual self, and your metabolism intact is a rare event. I’m now going to tell you some things I wish someone had told me.

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Wandering Witch Goes to the Faire

Wandering Witch Goes to the The Faire

Article & Photos by Natalie Zaman

I don’t know about you, but when the weather gets warm, my thoughts turn to Festival Season. I love a New Age Fair — the inspiration, the healing, the music, the shopping (I’m always in the market for some new tool, totem or talisman) — but before events like these went all “holistic,” they were steeped in swirling capes and bawdy banter — Renaissance Festivals! For over forty years, these once-upon-a-summertime fetes have been bringing the past — and with it, Pagan ways — to the attending mainstream populace.

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Finding Faerie in a Post-Modern World

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It’s a hot August day in Eugene, Oregon. The sky is blue, the sun is bright, and there is a hint of magic in the air. Crows call overhead in the lush green trees, their harsh voices adding to the cacophony coming from the swirling crowds. Sylphs in diaphanous beribboned gowns dance with pixies in striped stockings and sparkling wings of every hue. Wooly-legged, bare-chested fauns compare horns with dark sprites wearing lacy black corsets and wicked leather boots. On-stage, a Green Man in vivid leafy rags introduces the next performer while a roving jester juggles fragile glass balls; a satyr on ten foot tall stilts navigates deftly among the dancers as a rainbow-clad goddess makes her way through the audience. Tiny babies dressed as bumblebees and lady-bugs nap contentedly on patchwork quilts and blankets. Their mothers braid ribbons and yarn into each other’s hair and chat with passersby who stop to admire their adorable infants.

Welcome to Faerieworlds, one of the largest and most popular festivals dedicated to the celebration of all the lands of Faerie.

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