Undermining the Patriarchy Every Chance I Get. And I Get a Lot of Chances

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Hec

Hec

HecateDemeter is a woman, a Witch, a mother, a grandmother, an ecofeminist, a lawyer, a gardener, a reader, a writer, and a priestess of the Great Mother Earth.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Witches (along with many other denominations of Paganism) view sex as sacred. 

The Charge of the Goddess says that all acts of love and pleasure are rituals of the Goddess, and not only do I believe that to be true, it's one of the things that drew me to this religion.  In many ways, we're more open about sex (some of us say that we're more "sex positive") than the members of many/most other religions.  Similarly, we're more likely to be quite accepting of QLTBG, etc. sex/sexuality/identity, polyamory, public nudity, and various less-than-mainstream forms of sexual expression than the members of many other religions.  Our on-line discussions and our festivals and conferences often reflect this reality. 

I consider those to be some of our strengths.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Hec
    Hec says #
    Max, The sentence says: "Third, I'd like to suggest that we all consider that those who want to discuss ways to make Pagan even
  • Max Dashu
    Max Dashu says #
    "Feminazis," really??? No remedy for child abuse or battering, because He said, she said, just like in the courts. I'm disgusted.
  • Hec
    Hec says #
    I have posted a clarification over at my blog. You can read it here: http://hecatedemeter.wordpress.com/2014/04/11/clarification/

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

There's been a some buzz about the Sacred Space conference here in the magical Mid-Atlantic and the series of rituals/workshops that focused on Appalachian magic. I was lucky to get to go to a number of these and blogged about them over at hecatedemeter.wordpress.com.

While it wasn't identified as part of the Appalachian thread, there was another workshop/ritual that focused on the Goddess Columbia (for whom the District of Columbia is named) as an American Athena. Along with the Appalachian sessions, it served to ground the conference in this specific landbase:  America, the East Coast, the Potomac River watershed. That's a development that I believe is hugely important and I am convinced that the magic that came out of this year's Sacred Space was a sum greater than the whole of its parts.

Prior to the Columbia workshop/ritual, I was chatting with one of the Priestesses about political magic that we've done in Columbia's District. She mentioned dropping charged stones around certain government buildings, often right in front of guards. I described workings where my circle had charged birdseed and then I'd gone off to play the harmless old woman, feeding the pigeons -- right outside the Supreme Court building. We both had a good cackle about doing magic in plain sight.

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As Pagans, we're more used to being discriminated against than to discriminating against others.  Those of us who run businesses or sell our wares are, especially in these economic times, generally only too happy to get a new customer.  And so we're usually quite happy to read Tarot, even for the devout Christian who slips off to see us behind her pastor's back, or to perform a computer upgrade even for the atheist who thinks that devotion to any deity is a sign of mental illness.  After all, we're pretty much a live-and-let live group.  We're not out to convert others to our ways and we generally don't presume to determine what religion is best for anyone else.  (Heck, I can think of a number of people whom I hope don't become Pagan.)  Honest pay for honest work or honest wares is generally all we ask. 

Our main concern with laws (such as the one that was recently vetoed in Arizona) that would allow businesses to discriminate based upon "religious convictions" has been the impact those laws could have on QLTBG, etc. people.  Of course, those laws could have been used to discriminate against even those of us who are "straight but not narrow," as well.  Wear a pentacle around your neck when you take your child to the farmers' market and the lady selling apples could refuse to sell your child an apple because her religion teaches her that you "shall not suffer a Witch to live," and selling apples helps you to live.  If the sleeve on your jacket slips, the nurse at the 24-hour medical center could see your tattoo and refuse to sew up the cut that you got doing woodwork because he says that your pentagram offends his religious sensibilities.  You finally grab a cab late at night in a sketchy part of town only to be told that the cab driver doesn't believe that women should be out, unescorted and won't give you a ride.  If you get mugged a few minutes later, well, that just proves his point.

It's easy to imagine that the next step is some method that will allow the discriminating religious to easily determine whether the potential renter, car buyer, or restaurant patron meets all of the necessary requirements.  (Why stop at refusing to sell a cake to a same-sex couple?  What about a couple that includes a previously-divorced person or a couple not willing to specify that they are entering a "covenant marriage" where the man will "exercise headship."  (Don't blame me; that's the way they talk!)  What about selling nursery furniture to prospective parents who won't agree that sparing the rod spoils the child or selling a house to people who won't commit to attending your church every Sunday?  To voting Rapeublican since they are generally more favorable to rightwing Christians?)

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  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    One of the problems with laws is that they apply to everyone. Suppose a gay couple is running a bakery and the Westboro Baptist c
  • Stifyn Emrys
    Stifyn Emrys says #
    I think it's ironic that a group formerly subject to oppression (see the Decian persecution) now seeks to impose its beliefs on ot
  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    So is it now illegal to refuse to purchase GMO food because you believe it is harmful? I can see why big corporations would oppos

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

I've been planning a post on how right-wing Christians have framed their attempts to impose their religion on everyone else as "religious liberty."  It's a clever bit of framing, although rather transparent.  However, Rev. Emily C. Heath has said it far better than I could:

How to Determine if Your Religious Liberty Is Being Threatened in Just 10 Quick Questions.

by Rev. Emily C. Heath*

 Just pick "A" or "B" for each question.

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  • Hec
    Hec says #
    Mr. Ward, Sadly, I do not have a direct link. If you find one, would you please share? Thanks!
  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    The answer is C. My religious liberty is at risk when the religion of others is being attacked. No matter how "right" the attac
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    This is wonderfully framed. Do you have a link to the original? I'd like to repost it directly on one of my blogs, so the audien

The Wheel of the Year has turned and we're now well into Autumn -- just a few days out from Samhein.  We recently got flu shots at my workplace and colds are already going around my DC.  Health Care -- who gets it, what it entails, how to register for it, how to fund it, how to provide it -- is front and center (sadly, in a rather unhealthy way) in our body politic.

I belonged, for a number of years, to a Circle that had a lovely tradition at about this time of year of doing a magic working to increase our own immunity.  A day or two before the working, each of us would -- with intent -- shop for and prepare a dish meant to strengthen immunity.  One woman usually made a mushroom soup (http://www.prevention.com/food/cook/andrew-weil-true-food-kitchen-and-healing-recipes?page=2) as mushrooms are great for boosting immunity (see here:  http://blog.doctoroz.com/oz-experts/3-mushrooms-and-their-big-immunity-benefits).  I would make a fruit salad with chopped up blood and Valencia, oranges, ruby red grapefruits, kiwi fruits, dragon fruits (because, come on, of course!), and raspberries.  Another woman once made a delicious beet dish (http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/beets-immune-system-9259.html).  You get the idea.  We would gather, do a bit of magic to charge the food, and then consume it in sacred space in order to strengthen our immunity.

You might want to adapt this idea to perform a magic working to bring greater health not only to yourself, your family, and our populace, but also to our body politic (which, Goddess knows, certainly seems to have succumbed to various parasites). 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Sometimes

 Sometimes things don't go, after all,
 from bad to worse. Some years, muscadel
 faces down frost; green thrives; the crops don't fail.
 Sometimes a man aims high, and all goes well.

 A people sometimes will step back from war,
 elect an honest man, decide they care
 enough, that they can't leave some stranger poor.
 Some men become what they were born for.

 Sometimes our best intentions do not go
 amiss; sometimes we do as we meant to.
 The sun will sometimes melt a field of sorrow
 that seemed hard frozen; may it happen for you.

~ Sheenagh Pugh
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  • Peggy
    Peggy says #
    I agree completely! We need to step back--any action on our part will only exacerbate this situation.
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Beautiful poem; are you Sheenagh, HecateDemeter? I suppose that when the UN drafted the law against any nation ever again using c
  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    All hail saint Obama, and all his supporters.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Below is one of the best poems that I know about labor. 

I think it's especially appropriate for the one National Holiday out of the year when we honor both workers and the labor movement.  The labor movement brought all of us such "basic" benefits as the 8-hour day, the 2-day weekend, lunch breaks, and workplace safety standards (you know, unlocked doors and fire escapes).  Once upon a time, the labor movement brought many, many Americans a salary that allowed a family to move into, and, if desired, to advance from, the middle class on one worker's salary.  The erosion of the labor movement has kept pace with the erosion of workers' salaries and the erosion of the middle class.  Today, many Pagans find themselves living in below middle-class conditions.

Today, many Pagans, and certainly I include myself, are conflicted about the cheap goods that we buy that are made in bad conditions overseas, by workers who don't have decent pay or decent working conditions (shirts, iPhones, appliances, toys for our children and grandchildren, etc.).  Years ago, we could "look for the union label, when [we were] buying, a coat, dress, or blouse," but NAFTA and other corporate-written treaties have shipped those jobs oversees, to places where there are no protections for workers.  Even if you try (and who has time to try when too many of us are working three part-time, no-benefit jobs?) it's almost impossible nowadays to buy a shirt (or anything else) made by union workers. 

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  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Yes, like John and Bobby Kennedy. The 1940s played out in the 1960s.
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    I, too, add my thanks. I remember that catchy ad "Look for the Union label" set to the music of an older folk song. Everyone kno
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Yeah, the Masters Of The Universe used the mass media they owned to maximum advantage. We were pitted against each other with wedg

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Many Pagans -- whether we call ourselves Kemetic or not -- have a spiritual and emotional attachment to Egypt.  And we've watched with sorrow the events of the past week, often not even sure which "side" to support. 

I suspect that Ma'at supports the people:  the women, and children, and old people simply trying to live in the midst of violence and chaos.  I suspect that Ma'at supports the fathers, trying to do the best they can for their children, to bring in a crop, to grow old.  I suspect that Ma'at supports the land. 

A friend of mine suggested a ritual, which may be all that we can do from afar, but which is something we can do.  I'm going to perform it this weekend and, should you feel so inclined and should your Goddesses and Gods approve, I invite you to join me.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

I hope that you are enjoying a wonderful Lughnasadh.  I hope that you are harvesting all that you can manage and just enough to share. 

Here in the mystical MidAtlantic, there are lots of jokes about sneaking onto our neighbors' porches to leave bags of zucchini; we can all get overwhelmed this time of year by what our gardens produce.  I want to remind everyone in that (enviable) situation that most food closets and soup kitchens will gladly take extra produce -- they're masters at turning out soups and casseroles filled with your extra produce.  It's not so much a sacrifice as a way of sharing, a way of continuing and reviving the gift culture that may, one day, supplement, if not replace, capitalism.

As we've danced into Lughnasadh, I've been thinking a lot about sacrifice and its role in our magical/political lives.  Some say that this Sabbat springs from funeral games declared to honor Lugh's mother Tailtiu, a strong woman who died clearing forested land for cultivation by her people.  I want to honor both the sacrifice of the woman who cleared the land and the sacrifice of the forest.  I want to spend time today thinking of those who gave their lives to make our lives better, even when their sacrifices had unintended consequences. 

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When I read that the jury in the Trayvon Martin murder trial had returned a verdict of "not guilty," my first thought was for all the mothers of black sons.  Having raised a son, and as the Nonna of a grandson, I know that to raise a son in this culture is already a task fraught with difficulties and fears.  I can only try to imagine how much more difficult it must be to do that job knowing, every minute of every day, that your son is also in danger simply because of the color of his skin. 


My second thought was:  ALEC which promoted the "Stand Your Ground Law" that was included in the instructions given to the Martin jury.  George Zimmerman pulled the trigger that murdered Trayvon Martin, but ALEC, in my opinion, loaded the gun. 

My third thought was for the impact that the Martin verdict and Stand Your Ground laws may have for the Pagan community.  Even those of us who carry the privilege of white skin know that our religion makes us "the other" in the eyes of many Americans.  Indeed, the the fundie Xian whackjobs are now engaged in a deliberate propaganda campaign aimed at further "othering" Pagans.  One of the most pernicious things about Stand Your Ground laws is that they exonerate any murderer who can say that he felt "threatened."  Supposedly, the threat must be "reasonable," but the Martin verdict shows just how elastic that standard is, especially when the aggressor is more privileged than the victim.  One is reminded of Derrick Jensen's Fourth Premise:

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Joseph Bloch
    Joseph Bloch says #
    This has zero to do with Paganism, despite your desperate attempts to create a facade of relevance with your hypotheticals.
  • *d.*
    *d.* says #
    You're one to talk. I'd say this article about working towards social justice is more "Pagan" than your next-to-last post about th
  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    I am saddened by all the racism displayed in this article.

Anne asked me if I could post about some recent Supreme Court opinions and their impact on Pagans.  I'll take as given that, unless you've been on a several-week long retreat into the woods, you know that the Supreme Court struck down one section of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and left standing (on standing grounds!) a California court ruling that Proposition 8 (which outlawed same sex marriage in California) was illegal.  (Which, to deal with the too-many negatives therein, is to say that SCOTUS left intact a California court holding that essentially left same-sex marraige intact in California)  And I'll take as given that you know that the Supreme Court also struck down important provisions of the Voting Rights Act.  If you have been off in the woods (damn, I'm jealous), you can easily find blogs that discuss those opinions and their impact on Pagans. 

What I'd like to do over the next few posts is to discuss some additional Supreme Court opinions that will impact Pagans.  Today, let's talk about KOONTZ v. ST. JOHNS RIVER WATER.

I want to talk about this case because, inter alia [which is legal talk for "among other things"] , it demonstrates the importance of local politics, an area upon which, I'm going to argue over the next few months, Pagans ought to focus their magical (and other) efforts. 

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  • Adam Carter
    Adam Carter says #
    A good post to make aware people about the words of supreme court and I think the court knows better how to handle the situation.
  • macgren
    macgren says #
    I was not aware of the rules of the Supreme court regarding Fifth Amendement. After reading the above post, I also agree with the
  • Byron Ballard
    Byron Ballard says #
    You speak my mind, sister. Also, over on FB we are discussing Phrygian caps and I thought of you and linked to your fab blog. I l

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Today the Goddess Columbia got quite a bit of attention.

There are a number of Inaugural altars floating around the internet.  Here are a few:

From Selena Fox:  https://twitter.com/Selena_Fox/status/293415734984470529

From Hail Columbia:  https://dl.dropbox.com/u/369899/inauguration-2013.jpg

Another from Selena:  https://twitter.com/Selena_Fox/status/293437596854525953/photo/1

And here's Chuck Schumer praising the statue of the Goddess Columbia ("a woman!" he says, almost in surprise) which stands atop our Capitol building. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruo8iHyC5lI

Her official title is "Freedom Triumphant in War and Peace."  Schumer tells a bit of the story of her installation atop the halls of our government.  You can read much more, including the story of how Jefferson Davis, later President of the Confederacy, intervened to change her headdress, in Freedom's Cap: The United States Capitol and the Coming of the Civil War.  ( http://www.politics-prose.com/book/9780809046812 )

Love the current President or not, and I've got several bones of my own to pick with him, it's a lovely practice to set up altars to Columbia, Libertas, and Justica. You can buy for your own altar very reasonably priced replicas of the statue of Columbia (containing marble from the East Front of the Capitol) from the U.S. Capitol Historical Society:  http://www.uschscatalog.org/Prod-31-1-46-91/Marble_Statue_of_Freedom.htm

Who's on your altar today?

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  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    I love all the ways we honor such figures as Lady Liberty, but to be clear, they are allegorical figures. At what point, if any,
  • Byron Ballard
    Byron Ballard says #
    Freedom as a "woman"--imagine that. Thanks for this inspiring piece, sister. Hail, Columbia!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Great Demeter, I pour libations to you, great Mother, and I give alms in your name.

Great Demeter, I call tonight to you.

I remember how you loved your child, loved her with a love that would never give up.

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  • Willow
    Willow says #
    As a Pagan and Kindergarten teacher, I thank you. Your words touch me deeply. Willow
  • Constance Tippett Chandler
    Constance Tippett Chandler says #
    SO MOTE IT BE!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

After the terrible shootings in Aurora, Colorado, proponents of allowing mental patients to buy and carry assault weapons warned Americans in favor of gun control not to "politicize" the tragedy.  Similarly, after Hurricane Katrina, Bush administration officials insisted that "now is not the time to play the blame game."  It's become an expected response anytime something bad happens:  Don't Politicize the Tragedy!  

Which is odd, when you think about it, because, in a democracy, politics is how we go about trying to address national problems.  And when a tragedy brings some problem (gun violence, global climate change, underfunded relief agencies, etc.) to the forefront of our attention, that seems like a great time to start talking seriously about the problem.

And, of course, admonitions aside, tragedies do get politicized all the time.  Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson blamed the ACLU and the First Amendment, as well as Pagans, "abortionists," feminists, and homosexuals for the September 11th attacks.  Fox News has worked pretty tirelessly to politicize the deaths of Americans in Benghazi.  And before Hurricane Sandy had even made landfall, the Christian right wing was blaming homosexuals for the storm.

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  • Constance Tippett Chandler
    Constance Tippett Chandler says #
    This why we need a strong central government with regulations. Can you imagine a privatised FEMA? We would be charged to be saved,
  • Makarios Ofiesh
    Makarios Ofiesh says #
    If I might venture to suggest a slightly different framing of the issue: talking like responsible adults about matters of demonstr
  • Hec
    Hec says #
    Byron, You are right; "tragedy" does have a diff meaning in theatre. I am grateful for your wise, womanly wisdom, as well. Bles

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

As I do twice a month, I got together today with some magical women from Columbia's District and did some political magic.  What's political magic?  Well, I think that we all know what magic is, but a good working definition is <a href=http://hecatedemetersdatter.blogspot.com/2006/02/ability-to-change-consciousness-at.html>the ability to change consciousness at will</a>.  And politics?  Well, Oxford Dictionaries on line defines politics as: 

  • 1 the activities associated with the governance of a country or area, especially the debate between parties having power
  • 2activities aimed at improving someone’s status or increasing power within an organization.
     
    So political magic, for me, is magic that changes consciousness related to governance, that shifts the debate about power, and that influences activities aimed at improving status or increasing power.  As a woman, a Witch, and a Crone (as someone with little power) I'm interested in increasing my power, my ability to influence the conversation about governing.  And as a white, educated person who earns a good income and  moves within the corridors of power, (as someone with a lot of privilege) I'm interested in using my influence in ways that assist Mamma Gaia.
     
    I'm an old feminist, and I do believe that the personal is the political (and, vice versa).  So a working to find a home that my Sister can afford to buy is political magic.  A ritual to send healing to a woman going through breast cancer is political.  And, a ritual to influence the election is political.  A ritual to protect the Code Pink house is political magic.  
     
    What's political magic to you?
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  • june-marie
    june-marie says #
    Clearly, I overdid the magic !!!
  • june-marie
    june-marie says #
    OK, I just tried to post, but it didn't seem to work, so maybe I'll try again with a little magic this time. (Which may or may not
  • june-marie
    june-marie says #
    Why do you say of yourself that, as a 'woman, a witch and a crone', you are of 'little power' ? If you believe that, you will, ind

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

@BenjySarlin is right:  Although today Mitt Romney told a crowd in Las Vegas that, "I'm convinced that the path [Obama's] put us on is the path to Europe.  Or, I jokingly say...to California," it's difficult to imagine Obama telling a crowd, even jokingly, that, "I'm convinced that the path Romney would put us on is the path to Mississippi."  And if he did, the outrage would be unending.

Old Dr. Jung was onto something when he wrote about shadows and projection.  For decades, the political Right has loudly insisted that the political Left holds "regular Americans" in contempt.  (They've been admirably vague about precisely who is a "real" American; allows everyone to image that they must be insulting someone else.)  Spiro Agnew announced that Americans who opposed the war in Viet Nam were an "an effete corps of impudent snobs who characterize themselves as intellectuals."  The Moral Majority whipped up lower-income, white Christians by implying that an "immoral minority" of snobby liberals looked down on the "moral majority" as it eroded "American values."  George W. Bush, a child of generations of financial and educational privilege, ran as a brush-clearing Texas rancher with whom you'd love to have a beer, against John Kerry as a rich, "French," jet-skiing (apparently, only rich liberals jet ski) liberal.  (We'll just ignore the fact that Bush bought that ranch just before beginning his political campaign, cleared brush only in front of the media, and sold the ranch immediately upon leaving the White House.)  Despite decades of economic policies that hurt working-class Americans, the Right has been able to paint the Left as made up of arugula-eating, latte-drinking, snobs.

In the current campaign season, the Right has oddly let slip the pleasant veneer of  regular-guy-respect for the middle class.  The slippage has been evident for some time (see, e.g., Anne Romeny's discussion of "You People"), but it went mainstream overnight when Mother Jones released  a tape of Mitt Romney talking at a private fundraiser to "his base<" -- people who could afford to attend a $50,000 a plate fundraiser at the home of a hedge fund manager with a taste for sex parties.  (Hey, I belong to a religion that believes that all acts of love and pleasure are rituals of the Goddess, but I do wonder how this is supposed to go over with those middle-class "value voters," the old "moral majority" people who hate sex unless it's being enjoyed by Sarah Palin's abstinence-supporting, unmarried daughter or a hedge fund manager who raises money for a Mormon millionaire.)

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  • Tom Terrific
    Tom Terrific says #
    Like old Dr. Jung, I think you’re onto something as you write about shadows and projection. As it happens, if Obama told a crowd,

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

You can, as we all know, put four Pagans in a room and get (at least) six definitions of Paganism. So it's not universally true, but it's more-true-than-not and more-true-of-us-than-of-the-general-public that Pagans honor our ancestors. Daughter of a dysfunctional family, I've had to work on this practice. I've reached back into time, through meditation and trance, and developed a family tree that works for me and I've adopted more than a few Ancestors of the Spirit: people whose writings, and actions, and lives "raised" me much more so, in many cases, than did my own blood relatives.

And I would not be who I am today were it not for the spiritual and political DNA that I received from the Pankhursts, from Margaret Sanger, from Susan B. Anthony, from all of the known and anonymous suffragettes, and from Second Wave feminists. And, so, it is, maybe, quite appropriate that I am writing this post on the ninety-second anniversary of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Ninety-two years isn't really a very long time. My own grandmothers were young women in 1920 when it became legal for a woman to cast a vote.

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  • Rose
    Rose says #
    Glad you fixed it. It was beautiful. The clip you used should be used in all History classes, including college Intro courses to
  • Hec
    Hec says #
    Rose, My mistakes entirely. Anne and her DH have now fixed my mess and it is, hopefully, easier to read. Thanks so much for com
  • Rose
    Rose says #
    Your hyperlinks codes are visible and it's difficult to read your piece.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
If you've been following The Wild Hunt, Works of Literata, and Hecate, you've likely seen that a local Pagan priestess was recently denied a license to perform legal marriages in Arlington County, Virginia.  The clerk's refusal to give her a list of the ways in which her application was deficient suggests that there may be some discrimination and denial of due process here. 
 
I've discussed relevant Virginia law at my daily blog, but I'd like to talk just a little bit about what Pagans can do when they find themselves in similar situations.  The actions that you take at the beginning of a case, before you've hired a lawyer, often have a huge impact on the final outcome.  (Full disclosure:  I know Literata and consider her a dear friend.  My understanding is that she took and is taking the steps outlined below.)  
 
First, and I know that some of you don't want to hear this, when dealing with government and corporate officials such as, for example, the clerk of a county court, look and act professional.  
 
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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

It's almost Litha and that means that we're only a few months away from October, or, as I like to call it, the Month of Bad Framing.  October is, of course, Pagan Pride Month, the month when many Pagans create Pagan Pride Events.  And it's also the month when many regional tv news programs, local papers, and other media do their once-a-year, "Hey, Look!  It's Halloween!  Real Witches!" pieces.  To do that, they call up some local Pagan and ask a few questions about "real Witchcraft."

So what does bad framing have to do with this?  Sure, taking your pictures to the local big box store may result in some poorly-matted paintings and some cheap bits of plywood slapped together around your son's wedding photograph or that Muncha poster that you bought on-line.  (One of the best bits of advice that I ever got was from a dear friend who was an art teacher.  She told me to buy cheap art and expensive frames.  She was right.)  But that's not the kind of bad framing that can do real damage to the Pagan community and undermine the best-laid plans for your local Pagan Pride event.

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