Heathen Heretic

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Galina Krasskova

Galina Krasskova

 Galina Krasskova is a Heathen priest, author, and Northern Tradition shaman. She holds a Masters degree in Religious Studies and is currently working toward a PhD in Classics. Galina is the author of several books including “Essays in Modern Heathenry” and “Skalded Apples: A Devotional Anthology to Idunna and Bragi.”
(Photo by Hudson Valley photographer Mary Ann Glass.)

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Questions on Odin - Round 1

 

So on my blog http://krasskova.weebly.com/blog.html i've invited people to ask me about Odin. Post your questions there and I will answer them either there, or more likely here, at Heathen Heretic. 

Reader Tannim broke the ice with two very interesting questions, which I've decided to answer here. Thank you, Tannim! I encourage my readers to keep the questions coming. in the meantime, here are my answers to Tannim's questions.

...
Last modified on
2
Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Tannim Wolfkin
    Tannim Wolfkin says #
    Thank you for the information Galina. You have given me much to think about and work with.
Another Question on Piety from a Reader

 

In response to my call for questions, Trine asked me the following: 

"Why do you think humans bicker so much about the "right way" of pleasing the Gods (through ritual, devotional practice, etc.)? Is it because the Gods (in their mysterious ways) ask something different of each person, and sometimes what they ask and expect of one person is the complete opposite of that of another person? Or is it rather the result of human arrogance and ego? I feel it can be both, but having no experience really with spirit work and what it's like to carry out these duties, I'm not really sure. "

...
Last modified on
2
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Galina Krasskova
    Galina Krasskova says #
    That's a brilliant question and I want to take a little while to think about it. I'll answer to the best of my ability but it may
  • Candi
    Candi says #
    I have a question: If there's such a thing as pagan piety, is there such a thing as pagan sacrelige, and what form would it take?
  • Galina Krasskova
    Galina Krasskova says #
    I had to sit with this for a few long moments before responding because I was having a strong emotional response to the use of the

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Questions on Piety from a Reader

In my previous post, I promised that if people wanted to ask me questions about my practice or about the way I express piety in my devotional life, I would be more than happy to answer them. Liza broke the ice and asked the following three questions, which I found very insightful, so I decided to tease them out into their own separate post. 

 

Liza: For the newbie, young's, seeker without a physical community to lead them, how do you suggest they start? (Though I suspect I know this answer in part, I think it bears repeating)

...
Last modified on
4
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Liza
    Liza says #
    Thank you, BTW, for thinking out these questions to give answers. I've had a busy week, and I am now only catching up on reading a
  • Galina Krasskova
    Galina Krasskova says #
    Trine, thank you for your question. I just answered it in my most recent post. Go and take a look. These are good questions, fol
  • Trine
    Trine says #
    Thanks for opening up for questions - this one has been on my mind for a while. Maybe there's no answer to it (and maybe it's too

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Yet More on Piety

 

In a comment to my previous article, Anne Niven wrote: 


"But anytime we start getting into defining "piety" I start to twitch. I believe that there's absolutely no "right" way to serve the gods. Why? Because I believe that only personal gnosis can impart that information. And personal gnosis is just that -- personal. Which is to say, what's pious for you is, indeed, pious -- for you. But it might not be pious for me. In fact, what's pious for you might very well be *impious* in my relationship to the very same deity."

...
Last modified on
1
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Tannim Wolfkin
    Tannim Wolfkin says #
    Just finished writing a paper on hubris for my English class and came across this post. Wish I had read it before finishing the da
  • Galina Krasskova
    Galina Krasskova says #
    Thank you, Laura. I think you may be on to something with the way our society devalues service. In Heathenry, part of it is also t
  • Laura P
    Laura P says #
    Thank you again for writing about piety, a subject all too often overlooked in modern paganism. To me piety means respect, love an
Ritual, Monotheism, and Again with the Piety

 Seriously, folks, argue and disagree with me all you want, but do so based on what i say, not the misinterpretations you project onto what I say. I find it particularly interesting that in the course of the comments to my two articles on ritual (both those posted and those I received privately), quite often I'm being accused of everything BUT promoting piety and respect in ritual. Why is that such a difficult and challenging concept? It certainly wasn't for our ancestors. Piety was a central concept to the majority of ancient polytheisms, though of course the words used to describe this behavior varied from culture to culture. Plato, for instance, wrote an entire dialogue ("Euthyphro") in which the definition of piety was the central issue under discussion. The ancient Romans considered it a necessary and sacred virtue and one simply cannot read writers like Cicero, Pliny, or Seneca (to name but a few) without finding exhortation after exhortation to pious behavior both within one's temples and without. Why is it so difficult for us moderns? Because it is. I don't quite know why, though I have my suspicions, but it really is.(1) 

Unlike Plato, who had his character Euthyphro define piety in part as 'what is dear to the gods,' i would, in addition, define it as 'right behavior toward the Gods.' Piety is a curb and a guide to our behavior.  Of course, right behavior implies precisely that: that there is a right and wrong way of behaving, that there are standards. Standards do not imply tyrannical theocracy. They imply behaving properly and mindfully as the occasion and interaction demands. Now I've written about the opposite of piety here: http://krasskova.weebly.com/1/post/2012/05/pagan-blog-project-i-is-for-impiety.html for those who might want to take a peek. I'm going to let that stand and speak for itself, because there actually is a right way of doing things and it's not that difficult to figure out.  You know what else? The Gods and ancestors are more than capable of telling us what it is if we do the work and listen. Of course that might lead us to a reordering of our priorities but c'est la vie.

Piety, by the way, is a far, far different thing from orthodoxy. In nothing that I wrote on ritual, did i demand any particular orthodoxy beyond piety and respect.  I did not mention what Gods people should honor.(2) I did not exhort readers to any particular ritual style or practice. It's not about any specific action or belief. It's about attitude and awareness, about the way we approach our Gods and ancestors. By exhorting piety, i'm not demanding that everyone become a mystic. I'm saying that we should behave with proper decorum and respect when in the presence of the sacred. What it comes down to, I suspect, is that many people simply don't *want* to be pious. They don't want to be respectful. They don't want their spiritual world to revolve around anything but themselves. Otherwise instead of bitching when I mention piety, we could start talking about ways to show it; because really,  if right behavior toward the Powers isn't valued in our communities, then what is? That's the seed from which all good things flower. 

...
Last modified on
8
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • helmsman of inepu
    helmsman of inepu says #
    I think you're right about "the filter." You even see it operating with "Evangelical" atheists- it's not enough for them not to be
  • Ainslie
    Ainslie says #
    Paganisms of the world are diverse. Galina's a particular person doing particular work in a particular context. Some of that conte
  • Anne Newkirk Niven
    Anne Newkirk Niven says #
    Oh dear. I really wasn't gonna jump back into this, but feel I've been pulled in by reference. So I'll speak up and say, "me, me!

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
More on Ritual Praxis

 

So my recent Heathen Heretic article and its reception  (both of which you may find here: http://www.witchesandpagans.com/Pagan-Paths-Blogs/beltane-offerings-not-the-post-i-intended-to-write.html)  led me to a certain epiphany with regard to the way so many of us approach ritual. Let me begin by saying that I'm always surprised when people purposely, or so it often seems, miss the point of my articles. A colleague recently pointed out that much of my writing provokes people past their comfort zones and that too rather surprised me: that people would draw lines against experience and narrow their worlds down to such small, grey places. Oh well. we do and everything in our world encourages us to do this so I guess i shouldn't be surprised. Still, there is nothing in my practice that should be radical to someone engaged in deep devotion with their Gods. Nothing. 

So when my call for respect and piety as part of the ritual process raised such a din, I was rather surprised. Then I realized, that as with so much else, it all comes down to what one determines is the purpose of ritual. It's more than just determining to place the Gods at the center of the experience, though that is a huge part of it, rather it's understanding why we are doing any of this ritual "stuff" in the first place. What's the point? Whom does it benefit? Obviously I believe it's if not crucial, at least desirable or I wouldn't be doing it. I think we forget that there are two sides of the equation in any ritual process: the human side and the Other (Gods, ancestors). The ritual itself is a conversation, ideally a dance between those two factions. It's a means of communication and experience. I suspect that's what makes rituals that are focused on the Gods so threatening to some: they put something greater than we above the sum total of our limited human experience. They connect us with that Other. 

...
Last modified on
5
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Candi
    Candi says #
    "Why does this imparting their own morality or decision making process as a mean to judge others need be a negative? If experience
  • Candi
    Candi says #
    I forgot to mention that there are rituals out there that don't involve the Gods. They involve personal transformation. That b
  • Tim Schneider
    Tim Schneider says #
    "That being said, when I see or hear the words "[blank] should be [x]," a red flag goes up. I respectfully wish to relate that whe
Beltane Offerings- Not the Post I Intended to Write

I recently posted a question on my Facebook, asking what recipes and dishes folks would suggest be made as offerings to Freya for Beltane. Cooking for the Gods, cooking up offerings is such a sacred rite in and of itself, and I can't help but wonder if our ancestors didn't have certain traditional foods or customary dishes (beyond roast pig)  that were prepared for the various Powers. If they did, of course, we've lost that knowledge, but that doesn't mean that over time we won't regain it through the wisdom of our ancestors and inspiration of our Deities nor does it mean that we shouldn't give thought to what might please the various Gods and Goddesses the best right now. I very strongly believe that it's by engaging in devotion and working hard to strengthen the tradition and restore the lineage that such knowledge will be returned to us.  Devotion is a powerful teacher in and of itself. So as I'm planning my House's Beltane celebration, I wanted to find out what foods other people customarily made for Freya at this time of year.

 

I had hoped (expected even) to get suggestions of specific dishes and some folks did come through to some extent. I came away from the conversation with a number of ideas that I wouldn't otherwise have had and which I"ll share with you at the end of this article. Unexpectedly, however, the conversation also highlighted yet another aspect of the devotional deficit so prevalent in contemporary Heathenry. I was really bowled over, though I suppose I shouldn't have been.

...
Last modified on
4
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • sannion
    sannion says #
    I think you're misunderstanding my point, which is very easy to do with this imprecise medium of communication. So, to clarify,
  • Theresa Wymer
    Theresa Wymer says #
    I have a fairly new practice and am still working out a lot of things. It's very helpful to have writers like Galina and Sannion g
  • Laura P
    Laura P says #
    Why is it so controversial to love and respect the Gods and put the proper emphasis on the need to serve them well? It baffles me,

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
My Prayer Card Project

 

 

While I’m updating my readers here about recent additions to my work (Wyrd Ways Radio), I figured I should also tell you about my current prayer card project.

...
Last modified on
0
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Theresa Wymer
    Theresa Wymer says #
    I love your prayer cards!
  • Galina Krasskova
    Galina Krasskova says #
    Thank you! I've added a few to what's available here: http://krasskova.weebly.com/prayer-cards-for-sale.html.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
News and Updates

 

I'm currently working on a new article (after way too long a hiatus, I know) and if all goes well, I'll have that for you next week. There are a number of issues and topics that have caught my attention, I have a few projects in the works,  plus I still owe the final article in my 'honoring city spirits' series.  That's all in progress and i'm hoping to post weekly  now that my school term is nearly finished,  but in the meantime, i wanted to make a brief announcement.

 

...
Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Walking Toward Initiation

 

I know it’s been quite awhile since I posted here and for that I must apologize. I’m aware that I owe y’all a post about city spirits, the conclusion of my London series, but I’m afraid that’s going to have to wait at least a tiny bit longer. You see, I’m right at the tail end, the home stretch in the preparations for a major initiation: I’m making asiento in less than three weeks. It’s been a bit difficult to concentrate on anything else as the date draws near!

So in the interim, I shall share with you the first article that I wrote about this, a few weeks ago, before the pre-initiatory panic had truly set in—and all initiations bring their measure of terror. I’ve written about that too here: http://krasskova.weebly.com/1/post/2013/03/creeping-toward-the-sacred.html

...
Last modified on
3

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Honoring City Spirits - Part II

One of the first things I realized when I started honoring city spirits actively was A) how varied and individual their personalities are and B) there is a protocol for engaging with them, particularly as the relationship is first being established. Now that first point should have been a given for me; after all, as an animist it makes sense: spirits are individuals. I don't know why it came as such surprise to me that talking to New York City was different from talking to Paris who was different again from Venice or Washington or Berlin or Köln but it did. I suspect in my case, it was largely a matter of not having had much facility for sensing city spirits for a very long time and then suddenly finding myself able to engage. There was a real moment of cognitive disconnect to realize how much NYC had taken care of me and watched out after me when I'd been all but oblivious to his presence. Then there was the awareness that sometimes there isn't just one governing spirit in a city. New York City for instance has at least two: a spirit of NYC that I experience as male, and the spirit of Manhattan, a very angry (and justly so) Native spirit that reads to me as  female. We'll come back to that in a bit. Then of course each borough has its own spirit and each neighborhood within that.  It's a general rule of thumb in doing this work that the name of the spirit is the same as the name of the city, the name of the borough spirit is the name of the borough and so on.

 

My mentors when I began honoring city spirits were actually a city spirit herself (Paris) and a river spirit (the Seine). They introduced me to the fact that one could engage and gave me an introduction in doing so properly. They were surprisingly gentle (though Paris can be extremely formal and harsh, even dismissive, with those she does not deem worth her attention), perhaps because there was a family connection there through my adopted mom. I actually developed quite a crush on the Seine--he's a flirtatious, playful spirit of tremendous age and wisdom and quite beautiful. Yet he never came across as jaded to me and he was more than willing to chat and answer my questions. It was a good introduction.

...
Last modified on
6

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Honoring City Spirits - Part I

 

This is going to be a two, perhaps three part article series on honoring city spirits--something that's become a significant part of my own practice of late. In fact, having just recently taught a class in honoring the Holy Powers of the Northern Tradition, it struck me powerfully that in the end, so much of it comes back to honoring the ancestors (into which the Gods may, technically fit) and honoring the land. These little epiphanies are amazing--I find myself wanting to smack my forehead and wondering why on earth it took me so long to grasp what seems, in the end, so essential. I can't help chiding myself for not seeing these things sooner! I'm sure we've all been there at one time or another. Anyway, I've been doing quite a bit of work recently with city spirits and I wanted to talk about some of that with you, my readers.

 

...
Last modified on
6
Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Hugh Eckert
    Hugh Eckert says #
    I can't remember whether I've recommended this song to you... it seems very relevant to your post... "The Local Gods" by Shriekbac

This is going to be a fairly short and sweet post. I’ve been getting the same question via email again and again –and it’s a good question, don’t’ get me wrong---so I figure I should probably answer it. Lately everyone is asking me what to do with offerings be it to the ancestors, the Gods, or the house spirits once you’ve put them out.  

It really is a good question the answer to which I tend to take for granted as a given. It’s not though and since most of us don’t grow up (yet) in families that make regular offerings, there’s no reason that we should automatically know what to do with them. There’s so much about religious traditions and culture that we learn by observation, experience, and osmosis as we grow after all, and we’re not yet at that point as a community. I think in time we will be, but for now, thank the Gods for books, blogs, and teachers!

That being said, here’s what I was taught about disposing of offerings.  Ideally, one can do any of the following:

...
Last modified on
6
Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Anomalous Thracian
    Anomalous Thracian says #
    Very good topic, Galina. I like how you point out the practicality of these practices -- that is essential. "Tradition serves life

 

This weekend was an interesting working weekend for me. My colleague U. came down and we both presented at a local interfaith seminary. I taught on polytheism, ancestor work, and indigeny in the morning, and he gave an afternoon full of deep meditation and trance work focusing on honoring the earth and connecting with animal and elemental spirits. We come from two different traditions: mine Norse and his Dagara and seeing us working together and reinforcing each other's teaching was, I think, very enlightening for the students.  It really highlighted certain commonalities found across the board in indigenous traditions (like honoring the ancestors). The students themselves were amazing: they were engaged, enthusiastic and very brave given how ready they were to join in the work we were doing never having met either one of us before. I was honored and humbled to be amongst them. Obviously though, since I’m writing this article, something went awry during the course of the day and as my title suggests, that something had to do with ritual protocol. Actually, I think it had to do with common respect or lack thereof, but I'll get to that in a bit.

 

...
Last modified on
14
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Tim Schneider
    Tim Schneider says #
    An interruption is rude regardless of source, especially with a sign posted. There are some rituals which should not, for sake of
  • Sophie Gale
    Sophie Gale says #
    The first of November I had the privilege of hearing Rev. Dirk Ficca, former director of the World Parliament of Religions speak a
  • Galina Krasskova
    Galina Krasskova says #
    Those are beautiful principles and if that was what actually happened in interfaith communities, I'd be exhilarated. it's not thou

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Personal Topographies

 

So i'm sitting here at the airport getting ready to make what is probably my final trip to Zurich, a city that for many years held a very special place in my heart. The first time I ever visited, I was on my way to Berlin for a summer term of school. I wasn't a very seasoned traveller then but my adopted mom had arranged for me to spend a day in Zurich before hitting Germany. She wanted me to have a Swiss moment, to experience a place for however brief a time that had so defined her. I was so nervous! For some reason, I found Zurich immensely intimidating.

 

...
Last modified on
1
Ramblings about Ritual: Creating a Personal Festival Calendar

 

I went through a number of years, over a decade, where ritual practices formed the center of my devotional life. I was either attending or more often facilitating weekly rituals, with special celebrations on the full and dark moons and all the holy tides. Additionally, I was leading a working and teaching group and all this meant that scarcely a day passed without some sort of ritual awareness or practice. Often this was solitary but just as often with a group. For a year, given that we all lived in the same neighborhood, we even met each morning before our respective jobs for a morning rite (and often in the evening as well). It was intense and …after awhile I became very burnt out with ritual. This was all the more so when I would attend public rituals and find them either poorly or impiously led, devoid of divine presence or simply boring.

 Then there were the ones that were not precisely impious but pointless, you know, the rituals that were all about the people attending, that were little more than a social hour, rituals where the priest/ess would chat with friends during the service, not maintain the space, or rituals wherein the Gods barely rated a mention. I’m very skilled in ritual work. I had the benefit of amazing training with some very, very gifted and devoted teachers. By now, I’ve even taught ritual for over a decade. Believe it or not, doing rituals well is an acquired skill but one has to care enough to acquire it and recognize it as something relevant and on top of that hopefully have good models from which to learn.  After awhile, I figured unless I could find ritual facilitators as competent as I why bother? (I wanted to find them too, I really did!)

...
Last modified on
1
Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Dver
    Dver says #
    I can't imagine living without my religious calendar, both holy days and festivals. It's one of the ways I make sure Everyone is r
Miscellaneous Roundup of “Stuff” and a Reminder about Veteran’s Day

 

Well, my last blog post certainly prompted a rather heated discussion and that’s good: these things need to be discussed. It’s important, I think, for people to realize that there are polytheists for whom the destruction of a sacred shrine is an act of conquest and the continuance of centuries old war, and those Pagans  who cannot conceive of a shrine being anything other than a symbol, and thus  not important. We are that deeply divided, and it brings home the fact, that there is no one Paganism. We are many and we don’t always (perhaps rarely) agree. There are many different religions falling under the “pagan” and even “polytheist” rubric. Obviously, it should be clear to my readers which side of this equation I come down upon. In fact, this discussion prompted me to write an article on anger. You can find that at my personal blog:

http://krasskova.weebly.com/1/post/2012/11/pagan-blog-project-a-is-for-anger.html

...
Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

I am so incredibly angry I can barely type coherently. There has been yet another attack by monotheists on a Pagan shrine, this time in the Ukraine. This just sickens me. I have said before that as we, across the world, work to restore and revive our ancestral, polytheistic traditions there will be resistance. In this case, that resistance turned violent. It only highlights the necessity of beating back monotheistic dominance. For me, (and i speak for myself and my House here, not necessarily anyone associated with Witches and Pagans) it brings home that the monotheistic paradigm is a terrorist one. Freud, in his "Moses and Monotheism" posited that the beginning of religious intolerance started with the advent of monotheism. I concur. This is precisely what destroyed our ancestral traditions in the first place.

Nor is this the first attack this year on a Pagan site. Many months ago, an active shrine to the Roman Deities was attacked and its chief priest injured: http://krasskova.weebly.com/1/post/2011/10/vandalism-and-attacks-on-pagan-temples.html.

If this were an attack on a church you can believe it would be getting both better coverage, greater public outcry, and better response. Here's the link to this most recent atrocity:

Statue of Perun chopped down in Ukraine. http://oru.org.ua/index.php/component/content/article/304-ofitsijna-zayava-holovy-oru.html

Translation here: http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Foru.org.ua%2Findex.php%2Fcomponent%2Fcontent%2Farticle%2F304-ofitsijna-zayava-holovy-oru.html

...
Last modified on
5
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Christopher Blackwell
    Christopher Blackwell says #
    As I often interview Pagans in the Ukraine, Russia and so forth, I hear more and more about these attacks. The Russian Orthodox Ch
  • MerlynHerne
    MerlynHerne says #
    This is horrble, Galina and I understand your anger. We had a Pagan stone circle at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs dese
  • Tannim Wolfkin
    Tannim Wolfkin says #
    A better statue you say? WTF?!? We are talking a piece of sacred art here not some POS from the Museum of Modern Art. As someone

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Two Days till Samhain!

 

I was talking to a friend yesterday, pondering the topic for my next blog post here, and she asked me how I, as a Heathen, prepared for Samhain. I’d been discussing some of my preparations during the conversation and she was fascinated.  Most Heathens will probably tell you that we don’t celebrate Samhain and I suppose for the mainstream that would be true. We do, however, have a holy tide called Winternights held at roughly the same time and this festival also centers quite strongly around honoring the dead.  Six and one half dozen of the other, I suppose, as the saying goes. Personally, I hold a huge ancestor ritual and feast, the latter of which begins on October 29 and ends on November 3 and I don’t much care what name I ascribe to it. I will admit, I do tend to “go all out” at this time of year and I do so for a number of reasons.

Firstly, it’s good to give the honored dead a feast once in awhile. While I do something to honor my ancestors pretty much every single day, and I maintain three active ancestor shrines in my house (one to my adopted mom, one to all my ancestors, and one to the military dead for whom I speak), it’s still nice to honor them once a year on their own feast day in a very special way. So I do that. Secondly, Winternights falls right around this time (there’s no fixed date) so, perhaps in honor of my Celtic ancestors, I tend to celebrate that on Samhain. I’d be doing the same ritual anyway regardless. Finally, Winternights begins our Yule season and this is the holiest and most sacred time of the year. While Yule itself runs from Dec 20 through the New Year, the Yule season begins with Winternights. Plus, of course, there’s  a palpable shift energetically, and certainly the dead are very, very, very present at this time.

...
Last modified on
0
Crossing the Sacred Threshold: The Gods of Small Things

 

I am a Latin teacher currently (and laboriously) working my way toward a PhD in Classics. I read a lot of Latin texts (in Latin and usually with quite a bit of cussing along the way as I attempt to untangle classical Latin syntax). Fortunately, for the most part, I enjoy this and one of the tangential elements that I find particularly satisfying in my studies is occasionally coming across an interesting reference to ancient Roman [polytheistic] religion along the way.  It happens a lot and for all that I am Heathen, not a practitioner of Religio Romana, I find that every time I read about how a man or woman, raised in Roman culture, steeped in its religion honored his or her Gods, I find my own practices enriched.

When I started in Classics I was told (by a PhD candidate) that no one really understands Roman religion. I admit to being a bit taken aback. It always made perfect sense to me: honor your ancestors, honor the living spirit of your city, its genus loci, maintain the proper household and public rituals, and live in a world where everything has its spirit, everything is alive. It made perfect sense to me and I’ll tell you why: for all of their diversity, polytheistic religions – which are indigenous religions-- seem, in my opinion, to share a common thread, one quite alien to monotheistic thought; that common thread is rooted not just in a polytheistic and by extension pluralistic worldview, but in one that is, to greater or lesser degree, animist.

...
Last modified on
4
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Galina Krasskova
    Galina Krasskova says #
    Anne, I"ll try to write something on that soon.
  • Joseph Bloch
    Joseph Bloch says #
    I've been pushing for a re-recognition of the spirits of the land and household for years, now, both in my personal practice and e
  • Anne Newkirk Niven
    Anne Newkirk Niven says #
    I'd love to hear more about *how* to connect with the small gods of place; although I'm quite well acquainted with the larger deit

Additional information