PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

 

 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Pagan Pride (or: We Did It First)

A while back I had a call from my friend and colleague, Macha Nightmare. She had a new book deal and was looking for reasons to take pride in being pagan. As one does in these situations, she was consulting peers on the subject. That's kind of how elder-ocracies like the paganisms tend to work; it keeps us honest.

“Well, we did a lot of things first,” I said.

 “Like what?” she asked.

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PaganNewsBeagle Airy Monday Sept 15

On Airy Monday we start the week with stories of the Mind and the element of Air. Today we have the recovering ozone layer (good news and the bad news); the Polar Vortex explained; archaeology for Pagans; esoteric journal Abraxas; webinars on women & nature.

A U.N. report has good news for the ozone layer: it's recovering faster than expected. Unfortunately, the world replaced the ozone-depleting chemicals with a greenhouse gas, so now the world is looking for a replacement for *that* chemical, too.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Oses and Osern and Aesir (Oh My)

The English language is an amazing inheritance: every word a story.

In Norse thought we find the fascinating idea that, as with humanity, there are different tribes of gods. One of these tribes is known collectively as the Aesir. This is a plural form; the singular, unfortunately, is áss. In Icelandic, this rhymes with house, but there's no denying that it's jarring to the eye of the English-reader.*

The English-speaking ancestors knew these gods as well, but unlike the good old pagan word god, ôs came to refer specifically to a pagan god, and so fell out of common usage. Eventually the word became extinct.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_wonderwoman.jpg

Like a lot of American kids, I grew up on a steady diet of Saturday morning and weekday afternoon cartoons. I plunked myself down in front of the tv for hours, lost in the adventures of He-Man and She-Ra, the Lone Ranger and Tonto, Tarzan and Isis and Aquaman. And, of course, Scooby and the gang.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Vegan Pagan: Interstice the Second

As before, I've been following the Facebook conversations around my vegan blog entries, and this time I've noticed further discussion around the idea of plant sentience. Some of you have argued that plants are no different from animals and so the eating of plants and animals should be considered on equal footing.

How very animistic of you. I would expect no less from my Pagan community.

It's an interesting question and one deserving of its own space, so I've decided to offer a vegan perspective here in advance of my next major blog entry in the series.

For the sake of argument, let's presume that plants possess independent minds and thoughts of sufficient complexity that they can deliberately communicate with the world. From this premise, a plant-based diet would still represent the most ethical choice and the path of least destruction, because every single animal life requires the consumption of many plant lives. There are a number of peer-reviewed studies explaining feed to meat conversion ratios, but here's a handy chart from NPR that shows the amount of grain, forage and grazing land required to produce a quarter-pound hamburger:

Resources required to make a quarter pound hamburger.

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  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    In the 1990's an attendee of one of Swami Satchidananda's yoga workshops pointed out that scientific instruments had detected the

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Lessons from the Dead

The three skulls seem to be staring at me through their empty sockets. In times past I would have felt profoundly unsettled, but now these ancestral skulls seem vaguely familiar. It makes me wonder who these people were and what caused their deaths. I turn my eyes towards the woman lying in the middle of the hall.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Harita Meenee
    Harita Meenee says #
    Thanks, Carol! It's time for all of us to take action, any way we can.
  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    I agree with what you say and the connections you make, wish I could be with you in Athens.

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