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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in tarot

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Imbolc Spread: The Well and the Forge

This coming Saturday, February 2nd I am celebrating Imbolc. This year I believe our group is focusing more along the lines of the healing and water aspects of the goddess Brid (Brigid), but last year our sabbat used the dual aspects of Brid as the keeper of the well and forge (water and fire).

Respecting the dual aspects of the Well and the Forge, I have created a simple two-card tarot spread. Imbolc is an excellent time for divination, so I hope you use this spread during this time!

1st card: The Well: What situation do you need greater compassion in? Healing? Emotional empathy?

2nd card: The Forge: What situation do you need more drive in? Aggression? Force of will?

Let us not forget that the realm of fire can purify just as well as destroy, and water can destroy just as easily as heal. Please feel free to use this tarot spread as a jumping off point for your own personal tarot spread creations.

Blessings, and Happy Imbolc,
Hilary
www.tarotbyhilary.com

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  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    Excellent points about Fire and Water, Hilary. In Tarot, I think many (women?) tend to castigate the masculine suits (Swords and W

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Tarot Magick for Brigid's Day

At this turn of the Wheel of the Year many people celebrate Imbolc, or Brigid. This holiday is in anticipation of the coming spring.

Brigid, as the Goddess of healing, smithcraft and poetry, challenges us to use creativity to inspire our healing, and to use our need to heal to inspire our creativity.

This is a piece of meditative magick. You will use the tarot images to help you focus your mind and ask Brigid herself for guidance. Your answers will come through your intuition and your connection with Brigid. You will feel your answers in your heart, in your mind, and in your dreams and visions.

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Are Some Tarot Decks More Magickal Than Others?

Someone recently asked me if some decks carried more magickal power than others. I thought that would be a good topic to address here on 78 Magickal Tools.

The magickal power in a tarot deck comes from a number of sources. The first and most important source is the power of archetypes. This power is inherent in virtually any tarot deck.

What are tarot archetypes? Each tarot card holds a specific energy. One of the ways we can describe that energy is as a theme or character with which we are all familiar. For instance, we can see the Fool as the seeker on an epic adventure - he is Frodo, Percival and Don Quixote.  We can see the Hermit as the wise old man.  He is Dumbledore, Obi Wan and Gandalf. We can see the Lovers as the syzygy, or divine couple - Romeo and Juliet, Anthony and Cleopatra, Liz and Dick.

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  • Christiana Gaudet
    Christiana Gaudet says #
    Thanks, Deborah! There are so many layers of tarot symbolism!
  • Deborah Blake
    Deborah Blake says #
    This looks great, Christopher! You always delve deeper than most.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Magick of Significators

In earlier days of tarot reading a significator was cognitively chosen by the reader to represent the querent. The choice of the significator did not add to the interpretation of the reading in any way. It may have been simply part of tradition. It may have been seen as a way for the reader, the querent, the cards and the Universe to connect.

Significators were chosen from the sixteen Court Cards based on age, gender and hair color.

Only a few modern tarotists continue this tradition today.

Many tarot spreads have a significator position. The card that randomly falls into this position describes who the querent is at the moment of the reading. This can be very helpful information in a reading.

Significators have an important place in tarot magick, too.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Machelle-Earley_Queen-of-Pentacles_12B_240x.jpgI’ve been thinking about all of the different blogs that are out there, especially ones about tarot.  There are many wonderful tarot blogs but I want to do something a little different.  One of my specialties as a tarot reader and a Reiki healer is helping people discover and heal their shadows.  For those of you not in the know, the shadow is that part of yourself that makes itself known in the most inopportune ways after suppressing aspects of ourselves that that we do not want others to see.  These things can be either positive or negative and can come out in a number of ways, many of which are not very flattering.  In order to come to terms with these shadows, we must bring them into the light and work with them rather than against them.  The dark is as much a part of us as the light is and to be a person that is completely balanced, we must work with our shadows in order to make peace with them.

Sometimes we bury our shadows so deep that it is difficult to determine where the shadows came from in the first place.  A lot of detective work goes into shadow work.  We have to fist figure out what the shadow is, then we need to decipher how the shadow came to be in the first place and then we need to take the actions required to retrain ourselves to rework the shadow.  This is where tarot can come in.  Within the cards, there are clues to our shadows.  The cards have a way to delve into the subconscious when we are giving readings, so why not use that information with ourselves to do shadow work?  There are many people who already use tarot to help others but never even thought to do so for them.  It takes courage to want to do shadow work.  You have to be willing to come face to face with your shadows and it can sometimes be very painful.  I will tell you that it is a very rewarding and fulfilling experience and well worth the effort and pain that can come with it.

Every month, I will post a card showing general information about the meanings of the card and its shadow aspects.  I will also provide some suggestions to help you heal the shadow along with a monthly affirmation to help you stay on track.  Some of them may be simple and some may be more complicated.  Please remember that these are only suggestions and depending on the card, the shadow may not apply to you.  I suggest grabbing the same card from your favorite deck and see if you see the same shadows apply to you or if something else comes to you.  What one person sees in a card, another will not.  It’s important to use your intuition just as much as it is for the traditional meaning of the card.  What is it that you notice in the card?  Is there something that makes you angry about the card?  What makes you happy?  Do you feel anything physical?  Use that as a starting point.   The idea is to work with one particular shadow for the entire month.  For some shadows, this will be enough time, but others will require more time to work things out but after 30 days, you are well on your way.  With any kind of shadow work, I highly recommend keeping a journal to help you really work through the issues.  It’s an invaluable tool to that can really help you gain more insight into yourself and your behaviors.

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4 Wands of Yew: The Four of Wands and Yule

Our open Yule ritual run by my coven never usually falls on Yule (December 21st this past year). We had ours on December 8th, and it was a beautiful ritual but I didn’t truly see/feel that until afterward. As a member of the ritual team, I had my “eye of the prize” of helping to lead a ritual that would be beautiful and potent for the attendees, which led to me not recognizing the beauty of the actual ritual during it. My natural tendency is to go into extreme planning and practical mode when being a helper bee.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Tarot Magick for the New Year

There are many tarot spreads and techniques that we use to make predictions for the coming year. We can also use tarot magick to create the coming year.

You can incorporate this tarot magick technique into any kind of ritual, or simply perform it as a magickal working on its own.

While those who follow the Wheel of the Year celebrate October 31st as the ending of the old year and the beginning of the new, many of us also celebrate the calendar New Year as well. This magickal working is appropriate for either New Year celebration, or both.

First, remove the Hermit and the Sun from your deck. These cards have a specific place in the ritual. In this magickal working the Hermit and the Sun represent the old year and the new year, respectively.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Christiana-Gaudet_HRacepent_12B_raw.jpgThe four tarot Aces are potent magickal tools. In some tarot decks, their images are similar to the traditional altar tools used in many Pagan traditions. This is no accident. The four Aces are the Four Tools of Magick, and you can use them as such.

In divination, each tarot Ace can represent a new beginning. The Ace is the essence of its element as well as the beginning of a journey inspired by its element.

Here are three exciting ways to use the Aces to in your magickal life.

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a1sx2_Thumbnail1_Hilary-Parry_12A_window.jpgMy card of the day pulls last week had a very similar theme. They related directly to the weather phenomena we were experiencing in New York. If you’ve been living under a rock, you are one of the few people that haven’t heard of Superstorm Sandy that tore through many places (including the Eastern Coast) a few weeks ago.

This direct correlation of card interpretations to the weather surprised me, because usually when I pull my card of the day, it corresponds to more intellectual or personal situations and not what Mother Nature is doing. Normally I select my card of the day when I’m sitting in front of the computer…

That’s when I realized the difference. Every day of the storm (and prior to it) I was standing at the large window in my living room overlooking my neighbor’s yard. Seeing the sky, clouds, trees, ground… And then in the days that followed, the destruction that was left in Sandy’s wake.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

When I met Mari Powers in Mimosa, a downtown gift shop in Madison, WI, I had been a nameless customer who could read the tarot to a limited point but remained curious about the ability of others who claimed they read the tarot – especially others who read for a fee. With no small amount of skepticism and plenty of time on my underemployed but not quite poorly paid hands, I shrugged oh, what the hell and marched into the softly lit room. On a corner table, eleven decks with beautiful artwork hypnotized me. Any mesmerism gave way to frustration when Mari Powers directed me to choose a deck for my reading. As it turned out, this wasn't a session in which the querent sat back and listened to what influences impacted her life in the past, present, and future. Mari expected the client to take notes on a lay-out sheet during the session, take the sheets home, and think about how the influences manifested in her or his life. The idea of doing any work hadn't exactly appealed to me. Mari impressed me, nevertheless. She seemed to care about whether or not the questioner understood the reading. She didn't shy away from offering advice on any problem area that plagued the seeker.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Mari_Powers_12A.jpg

Even today, Mari's talent and compassion deserves a nod. Before I roll out this interview, however, allow me to confess I'm skeptical about readers in general. Any ol' joker with a deck and a tent may hang out his tarot shingle. At one point, I compared my readings – and I trust me – with Mari's interpretations. Though we each used a different deck, our interpretations of the spreads were similar.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

 

Magician Cropped 300
The Magician from the Snowland Deck

You’ve just put down yet another Harry Potter book, relishing the time spent among wizards, house elves and boggarts. Or maybe you’ve had the privilege of watching Criss Angel’s live show, BeLIEve, at the Luxor in Vegas, or reserve a front seat on your couch every week to watch his TV show Mindfreak. Alternatively, you may be a fan of the beloved Oz books by L. Frank Baum, or an avid devotee of the Wizard of Oz starring Judy Garland.

Guess what? You’ve just spent time in the presence of the Magician archetype.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

A few weeks back, I listed the how-to writing guides which I found most useful. Among them was Corrine Kenner's Tarot for Writers. Throughout her text, Kenner references the traditional Rider-Waite deck -- a deck which I have never owned or used. Nonetheless, Kenner's exercises and suggested spreads work with (virtually) any deck.

That (virtually) there is important. The book has proven most useful not just with the decks with which I am most familiar, but also those decks that contain the most densely packed imagery.

The first two decks that I purchased (I really can't remember which came first) were The Motherpeace Round Tarot by Karen Vogel and Vicki Noble, and The Goddess Tarot by Kris Waldherr. I have since added The Anubis Oracle by Nicki Scully, Linda Star Wolf, and Kris Waldherr; Ancient Feminine Wisdom of Goddesses and Heroines by Kay Steventon and Brian Clark; The New Mythic Tarot by Juliet Sharman-Burke, Liz Greene, and Giovanni Caselli; and the Art Nouveau tarot from Lo Scarabeo, to my collection.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Rebecca Buchanan
    Rebecca Buchanan says #
    Thanks for mentioning Dugan's new tarot deck. I will have to see if I can find a copy.
  • Emily Mills
    Emily Mills says #
    Wonderful post! I haven't picked up The Goddess Tarot, but I love that the staves are the path of Freya. I just took a class about

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Hello Tarot Detectives!

Today at Tarot Eye we're going to spy on the symbols in The Magician Tarot card in the Rider-Waite-Smith tradition.

Click for full description.
Universal Waite Tarot ©U.S. Games Systems

Number 1 – First movement; Breath of life. The numeral 1 is upright and phallic, a masculine number of initiation. It links Above and Below.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

This month we are going to take a look at why people choose to become psychic readers, and it could get dirty before we're finished! There are many reasons why a person would choose psychic readings as their profession, and not all of them are as reputable as one might think. Take a few minutes to contemplate this; why would you choose to do this for a living?

Many people feel the call to do readings simply because they are fascinated with some kind of oracle or technique, and they want to hone their skills. I personally started out with Jamie Sams's Medicine Cards*, and then progressed from them to stones and crystals, and finally into Tarot. I wanted to read because I was hanging out at a spiritual coffee-shop type place with other readers, and I wanted to fit with them. I'd done some astrology back in the 1970s, in the days before computerized programs, and it was just too much math! I envied those who pulled out a bag of stones or deck of cards and started waxing lyrical to a captivated audience. I wanted to be part of that.

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To all the writers and poets and editors out there, I offer you fair warning: you know all those how-to manuals that fill the writing and publishing sections at bookstores and libraries? 

Yeah.

Useless.

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  • Wendy L. Callahan
    Wendy L. Callahan says #
    As an editor with two publishers, I MUST have the latest CMOS on my desk. As a writer, I figure the dictionary and thesaurus are
  • Rachel Lee
    Rachel Lee says #
    Many Thanks Rebecca, I am looking into all these books, except the thesaurus & dictionary as I have them, but the "Tarot For Write
  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    I, too, beg to differ. Being a voracious reader does not a good writer make. Writing is a craft, and it takes dedication, persever

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Click for full description.
©1990 by U.S. Games Systems, Inc

Today we're going to explore the abundance of symbols within the enigmatic High Priestess Tarot card from the Rider-Waite-Smith tradition.

 

Click for full description.Number 2 – Balance; Yin/Yang; Opposites Unified (Taoism); "Good Things Comes in Pairs" (Chinese philosophy); Diversity (Pythagoras); Potential for Disorder/Evil (Pythagoras); Balance; Duality; Opposition

 

Click for full description.Black and White Pillars – As the number 2, black and white signifies duality—yin/yang, dark/light, feminine/masculine, severity/mercy, passive/aggressive, esoteric/exoteric, heart/mind, intuition/logic and so on. Toggling back and forth, they are "either/or". However, the central veil featuring pomegranates and the date palm tree connects the two pillars—suggesting integration and the union of opposites. The two pillars, when joined by the veil, signify "both".

 

B and J – In I Kings 7 (Old Testament), the author offers a detailed description of Solomon's temple, including the pillars that marked the entrance. Verse 21 states: "Then he set up the pillars by the vestibule of the temple; he set up the pillar on the right and called its name Jachin, and he set up the pillar on the left and called its name Boaz." (NKJV) In Hebrew, Jachin means "He Shall Establish", while Boaz means "In It Is Strength".

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  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    Just saw your post, Lisa! Fascinating insight. Thank you for mentioning this and posting the link!
  • Lisa Allen
    Lisa Allen says #
    Excellent blog post Janet! May I also mention that the Golden Crescent may also refer to the Crescent of Venus (aka the Horns of
  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    You got it, Jeff!

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