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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in parting the veil
Mysterious Egypt: Part Three, Isle of Philae, Isis, Nefertari, Saqqara Temples, Ramses II

My joy knew no bounds for I had returned to Isis Temple on the Isle of Philae in Egypt's Nile River. Wondrous feelings of devotion of the goddess Isis flowed through my psyche as I sat on that block of pink granite levitating. I recalled how Isis appeared to me in a New Years eve meditation. She was dark haired, dark skinned and wore the vulture headdress and the solar disks upon her head. She was sober looking and her message to me in that meditation was one of being blessed as I continued my spiritual journey. 

I discovered a few years later that I had been a priestess in the Temple of Isis during the reign of Ramses II around 1300 BCE, and that I used to kneel on that very stone that had not yet been placed back inside the temple! When I recently saw who I was -- Nefertari -- I had just released myself from a prison that I had been held in for 3000 years. The process is called the CCMBA, Complete Conscious Mind Body Alignment technique that Dr. Sharron Forest, of British Columbia had discovered. When I did the CCMBA with Dr. Forest I saw that I had become the wife of Ramses II because I was of royal blood and I was living in the temple as an initiate at the time I was chosen. At some point in my queenly journey I agreed to go through an initiation in the Great Pyramid in a closed sarcophagus. By this time evil priests had taken over the feminine Egyptian sacred sites.

I feel it was a combination of things that got me murdered, as I was also convinced of and promoting the return to the worship of one God, a philosophy that had died out in Egypt. I died unresolved in that closed sarcophagus so many years ago. I went stark raving mad. During the release of this stuck emotional memory the karmic block held in the bones of my spine were forevermore released.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Ancestor Vigil

We've been doing the Ancestor Vigil here for about 20 years and every year it is a little different but the intention is always the same. It is not a Samhain ritual, it is not a celebration of Hallowe'en, it does not glom onto the trendy love of Dia de los Muertes. It is a ritual commemoration of the Recent Dead, the Beloved Long Dead and the Mighty Dead.

We set up a central altar, a candle-lighting station and a place to get more info on Mother Grove Goddess Temple and to leave your food donations for the food pantry. People are invited to place mementos on the altar and there is a place in the ritual where we speak the names of the dead that are closest to us.

I keep a Samhain list every year and I read that aloud, too.  There is a section of the ritual devoted to victims of religious persecution and a segment there on the European Inquisitions.

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"Because There is No Veil..."

Several weeks ago, I was honored to help a team of folks create funerary rites for a recently-deceased member of our community. The primary facilitator lives several states away and we spoke over the phone a few days before he was scheduled to arrive for the memorial.

He and I are in different traditions and it was helpful to hear how they do things and to figure out the best way for me to contribute, to help. He told me early in the conversation that the intention for the ritual was to dance the deceased through the Veil--something that might be tricky so far from Samhain. It was to be a joyous celebration with song and poetry and drumming. I offered to help with the drumming (I play a big frame drum) and we chatted a bit longer about the general shape of the rite.

We seemed to be hitting it off so I also told him an observation from my little place in the big world--there hasn't been a Veil here in several years. I'm sure he didn't quite believe what I was saying--why should he? And it didn't have any import in the work we were to do together. Once he got here, though, I think he felt it--this wispy and threadbare barrier between us and our Ancestors.

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  • Tess Dawson
    Tess Dawson says #
    "But the Ancestors haven't been apart from us here in years. You have only to sit in a quiet place and you begin to hear their mur

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
And so it begins

I've written before here about how, in our household, Samhain starts early.  For us it begins at the end of September, during the week when we've repeatedly lost beloved pets and on the day when, two years ago, I pledged my service to the Wild Hunt.  This year, that day was marked with an inadvertent bloodletting when the Hunt, not satisfied with the efforts I had made thus far on their behalf, aided me in slicing open the knuckle of my right index finger almost to the bone with a pair of sewing shears.  (Followed, of course, with a expensive trip to the emergency room and several weeks of limited ability to do anything--including typing and crafting--with that hand.  The Hunt does not play.)  

It continued the following week when I made a trip to one of the city's oldest cemeteries (and bear in mind that here on the west coast, "oldest" means the 1800s, and the most ancient looking monuments, crumbling with apparent age, are not truly ancient at all but merely rain-damaged).  I brought with me home-brewed mead and bone meal, to feed the dead, and locally harvested apples for Sleipnir, Odin's giant eight-legged steed.  (Eight legs, by the way; have you ever thought about that?  Why does He--the horse, that is--have eight legs?  Spiders have eight legs.  So does a casket, when borne aloft by four mourners.  Sleipnir is, indisputably, a horse of death, a steed to carry one to the land of the dead--which, throughout the Norse myths, is exactly what He does.)  I discovered an area devoted to the Civil War dead, which startled me because it seemed the wrong coast for that, but the monument statue of a soldier in uniform and the plots of the military dead exuded an aura of welcome for me, a kinship with the "once human" contingent of the Hunt, with Odin's fallen heroes.  Here was succor and support, and so it was here that I marked the stones with my blood, freshly drawn from my finger (not the one with stitches!) using a lancet.  (The dead were especially interested in and enthusiastic about the mead, by the way!)

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  • Jolene
    Jolene says #
    Another excellent post! I'm looking forward to both our celebrations, and I'm thinking that splitting them up as we have this year
  • Soli
    Soli says #
    I found a small pomegranate at the store this weekend and bought it, so I should do something. Just no idea what. Some of it is be

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