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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in loki

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Podcast: What is a Godspouse?

Wanna hear what my voice sounds like? I am now hosting a podcast for the Raven Faerie, called Raven About Metaphysics. The inaugural episode is on Godspousery, and Seren Lebannen of Bonfire at Midnightis my guest, so there's some Trickster talk in general along with an overview of our experiences.

I would like to reiterate that most Lokispeople are notgodspouses, because I feel like in joking about how many wives He has, that I don't want to give the impression that anyone *has* to have that type of relationship with Him. There is something about His wives being vocal though, myself included. I don't have a scientific reason for it, but certainly He lights a fire in the head and in the heart, and that is why I talk about Him.

Speaking of Loki, I'm sure some of you are wondering when the inevitable Loki podcast will happen. I haven't scheduled a date yet, but I have a couple ideas of who I'd like to invite to talk - probably someone who is NOT a godspouse and who is reconstructionist, or at least more reconstructionist than me, just for a variety of perspectives on Himself.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Loki the Horned God

Today I'd like to present some meta thoughts on Loki’s depiction, spurred by an interesting conversation on my FB about Loki being likened to a Satanic figure in the Norse pantheon, and me mulling over how this is actually a backhanded compliment. I could rant on how Lu/Satan is unjustly vilified, but that’s a rant that is probably better handled by an actual Luciferian. I am not an expert on Lucifer, but the vilification of horned depictions of Gods is relevant to my interests.

image

Horned!Loki on the Kirkby Stone.

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  • Jön Upsal's Gardener
    Jön Upsal's Gardener says #
    Aside from the problematical identification of those images to either side of his head on the stone as horns (they are both too lo

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Why You Should Read LOKI: AGENT OF ASGARD

Yesterday, the first issue of Marvel's LOKI: AGENT OF ASGARD arrived in your local Comics and Games Emporium. I haven't yet acquired my copy, because a frost giants are currently attacking my neighborhood and my roommate is too busy binging on Star Trek: Enterprise to dig his car out so we can exit the driveway, but I want to encourage you to pick up this comic.* If you have any interest in Marvel comics, or the Marvel movies – or, to tread into dangerous waters, in the ongoing folkloric evolution of Norse mythology through popular culture – you should give it a read.

The first two categories should be obvious: Loki is a major character in the Marvel Universe, and arguably the second most popular character in the movies after Tony Stark. AGENT OF ASGARD appears to be the culmination of several years of intense character development for Loki as well as a re-alignment of the character to better match Tom Hiddleston's portrayal in the films. But my third reason may require more explanation.

In short: if you think Marvel's treatment of Thor, Loki, and the entire Norse pantheon doesn't have an impact on the way people approach those beings in religious practice, I think you're willfully ignoring reality. How could it not? The number of people who know of Thor through Chris Hemsworth dwarfs those who have read the myth of Thor and Loki's visit to Útgarð. Some of those people will come into Heathen religions because of that first contact. The conservative nature of Heathenry ensures that anyone who first discovers the Norse gods through pop culture will immediately learn the differences between modern media and ancient sources, but it can't help but have an impact.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • C.S. MacCath
    C.S. MacCath says #
    I was holding out on this one; my pull list is already a mile long. But you've talked me into it. Time to write my comic book pu
  • Taylor Ellwood
    Taylor Ellwood says #
    This is an excellent example of how pop culture benefits more traditional belief systems, because as you write it can be a gateway
  • Peter Beckley
    Peter Beckley says #
    I sometimes fear the power of pop culture; unchecked it invariably waters down the message for the sake of making it palatable to

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

The next deity (#6) from the “god graveyard” is Loki.  Loki interests me unlike a very large part of the Norse Pantheon, even more so than Odin and Thor.  Maybe it is his association with fire (fire sign here [grin]) or the devotion of Sigyn.  More likely it is the fact that he doesn’t fit in anywhere (as I often feel that way).  Yet it could e my tendency to cheer on the underdog or maybe his similarities to Hermes.  Any way he incites a cautious curiosity in me. 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

I was chatting with some friends about the discussions about Pagan leadership. There's a conference planned for hard polytheists, and Shauna Aura Knight is writing a series on community building that's good reading (and thanks to Jo for pointing it out to me!). I'm really happy that constructive dialogue is starting up, and I hope that it yields community building and infrastructure in the Pagan and Heathen communities. When I think about my own strengths and weaknesses as a priestess/gythia, and what I'd like to leave as a legacy to my community twenty or fifty years from now, I don't want bickering with monotheists, or other Pagans to be that legacy. I'd like to build a support system for our faith.

Some of that comes from my background as a teacher and speech path; one of the goals in working for ChildFind was to assess both child and family's needs and connect them to government and private resources that would help them improve their lives. What we deeply need, IMO, is the same kind of training and access to resources, because when people seek spiritual counseling and connection, they're often hurting and in need of healing. I am not a healer, but I can help direct someone to the type of healer that they need. Of course, this type of work involves knowing yourself (and oh Gods, we talk about that alllll the time, but HOW do you know yourself?) - that's heavy duty metacognitive work. Just to pick on myself a moment, because modeling often helps people figure out their own processes:

Strengths:
Creative
Knowledgeable about the resources in my area (public and private)
Adaptable
Intelligent
Passionate
Have articulated personal monastic/ministerial ethics, ideals, and goals

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Sigyn: Loki's wife by Shirl Sazynski
This essay first appeared at Eternal Haunted Summer last year and is part of an illustrated book on Norse Goddesses I am creating from my journeys as a spaekona (Norse seer).


Butterflies: A Meditation on Sigyn

Motion and color. Orange-flecked wings— flickering, flowing, flying, flexing. So many of them that you cannot see what they rest upon, simply that there is life, a whirr of scaled wings.

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  • Cara Freyasdaughter
    Cara Freyasdaughter says #
    Hi Shirl! This is a lovely picture of Sigyn. It's so nice to see her get some attention. This is a great teaser; I'm really lookin
  • Shirl Sazynski
    Shirl Sazynski says #
    And if more of us talked about these sorts of experiences, the process would be easier on everyone. While all of these encounters
  • Shirl Sazynski
    Shirl Sazynski says #
    Hi Kara! Thanks for your response and the compliments. It's why I'm writing things like this; I want to bring humans and the Gods

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Crush

“I don’t have crushes.”

 

I accepted long ago that my friend has achieved a higher level of consciousness than I. But, seriously? No crushes?

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  • James  Tomlinson
    James Tomlinson says #
    Another brilliant piece, Archer!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
On Offerings

I suppose I should weigh in on the offerings and consumption of said offerings. I give Loki a fair amount of food and drink. He enjoys the extravagant gesture, but having spent time starving in a cave (still starving, since time is not linear for Him and everything is happening, has happened, will happen) He doesn't really care for the wasting of food in my personal experience. Furthermore, my ancestors, particularly the ones who lived through the Great Depression, would have a coronary if I dumped lots of food regularly. If I have an excess of food, or more of a meal than I can eat, there is always someone who is hungry in my local community.

I have one exception to this: alcohol. I feed Loki more booze than I could ever consume (or should). So that gets poured out when He's done with it. It's likewise for other Deities that I offer alcohol to as well.

And it's different for my vaettir as well; I have fruit bearing trees on my property, so I feed them, because they feed me, but what I give them is often what I cannot eat, like excess fat that wouldn't do my arteries good but is a rich treat for them. They don't require that very often though, and in truth I find that they prefer that I behave in more ecologically friendly ways - recycling, finding ways to pollute less, etc.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

My name is Harrison Hall. You might know my writing from the work I at "Kvasir Amongst the Gods" over at Wordpress. A few months ago, one of my fellow bloggers suggested that I apply to write over here at Witches and Pagans, as she thought my writing style would be a good fit. I did so, and I was graciously and somewhat surprisingly accepted. This process took about a month. That neatly brings us up to the present.

That's not very interesting. Feel free to pretend that the month of processing was actually a cover so I could go forth and battle an army of genetically enhanced velociraptors that were trying to take over the world. You're welcome.

My blog at Wordpress is about my religious views, but the scope of such writing tends to be all over the place. That's not accidental, as I enjoy having the ability to just let loose with whatever thoughts or ideas I feel needed to be shared the most. When I was asked to select an area for my W&P blog to focus on, I decided to write about something that is close to my heart and has been coming up more and more over the last few weeks. The various denominations and interpretations of devotional, polytheistic, Paganism have always struggled with getting along with one another. This seems to be especially true when it comes to Heathenry and Norse Polytheism. I don't like that.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    As a soft-polytheist I commend your sentiments, Harrison. Thanks, also, for taking care of those genetically enhanced velociraptor
  • Harrison K. Hall
    Harrison K. Hall says #
    Well, you do what you can...both in terms of interfaith diplomacy and dinosaurs.
  • Heather Freysdottir
    Heather Freysdottir says #
    Yay! So happy to see you here.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Bridal mysticism and community

It's October, which is a special month for Himself and me, and the artwork featured in this post is commission is a gift for Him for a personal festival. The artist is Tab Cole, and her deviantArt is here: http://www.ladysaishan.deviantart.com/gallery/ if you'd like to see more of her work.

In other news (?) there seems to be yet another godspouse controversy, which has generated posts here and there. I'm not sorry to say that I've been engaged in other activities and don't know what started people ranting. As someone who gets asked a lot about godspousery, I'll say this:

Relationships can and will vary, even if you're married to the same Deity as someone else. Most spouses do some kind of Work for their Beloveds, but Work is still (usually) secondary to the relationship, and most of the important stuff happens off camera. People don't see most of what happens between Loki and me, and we're not unusual in that respect. Common sense moment: you don't see most of my other relationships, or much of them either. Y'all don't know my best friend's real name. Or what I gave my mother for her birthday. It's the Internet. I share what I think is important, and I keep to myself what I think is too personal to share.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
The Work of a Godspouse

I'm sick (the normal cold/flu type of sickness everyone gets, in addition to my chronic stuff) so I'm not sure what a good idea it is for me to expect coherent writing of myself, but this topic keeps coming up and every time it does I have the urge to pick at it a little, because it touches on some underlying issues of my own. So, since it's Hunt season and thus the ideal time of year for cleaning out dark corners and hunting down internal demons (as well as external ones), here we go.

If you haven't already read this, as well as the post my partner, Jolene Dawe, wrote in response to it here, go do so now--I'll wait. The original article is, by and large, a fairly well-reasoned exploration of the divisiveness among Lokeans as a “community” (if you could apply that term to such a diverse group-within-a-group), and for the most part I have no quibbles with it. For one thing, I'm not a Lokean, and for another, I too have witnessed the issues the author writes about and I don't disagree with many of his/her (forgive me, I'm not sure which) conclusions. However, the section of the post dealing with the Lokean sister-wife culture made me squirm for two reasons: 1) as has happened in previous posts by other people, here is yet another non-godspouse telling godspouses what their proper conduct as well as their work in the world “ought” to be, and 2) the assumption that being a godspouse is about “work,” per se, in the first place. 

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Questions on Pagan Monasticism

I'm writing today about Pagan monasticism, for a couple of reasons, one being that a colleague in my study group asked about how you can tell whether you’re called to clergy as a monastic, particularly as opposed to being a priest or priestess. The other reason I'm writing about it is because many Pagans are not aware that monasticism is a vocation in our faith, and certainly even fewer people outside Paganism.

“While in common usage the terms "nun" and "Sister" are often used interchangeably (the same title of "Sister" for the individual member of both forms), they are considered different ways of life, with a "nun" being a religious woman who lives a contemplative and cloistered life of meditation and prayer for the salvation of others, while a "Religious Sister", in religious institutes like Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity, lives an active vocation of both prayer and service, often to the needy, sick, poor, and uneducated.”  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nun

I can’t find the same sort of reference for the difference between “priest” and “monk,” although I suspect it’s somewhat similar. It’s been a long time since I formally studied Catholic doctrine. However, I’d also say that in Paganism, the lines are a bit fuzzier in terms of monasticism. If we were using the strict Catholic definitions, I’m somewhere between a nun and a Sister – I have a large amount of most of my days dedicated to contemplative study, prayer, and meditation, but I also do a lot of community work online and in person. This is why I have “free-range nun” listed as my occupation. It’s sort of tongue-in-cheek, but it’s accurate.

In regards to partners, celibacy and monastic practice – celibacy can be a choice or it can be asked for by a deity. For the record, I don’t consider myself celibate, and Loki has said to me that if I desire a mortal partner or physical affection, all I have to do is ask and He’ll arrange someone appropriate for us. I think that if I were not demisexual and monogamous, He would be a-okay with me having a mortal partner, but this is not really of interest to me right now. All that said, Loki is not a God of many prohibitions. I know some people define or conflate monasticism with asceticism, but in my experience, it’s not about having things or not having things, but about removing what you don’t need to be attached to any longer, which is also a Lokean value in general.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
"The point of Pride is our recognition of our own self-worth and the ability to live fully without reservation, allowing our true nature to shine outward while not giving in to the ego's temptation to compare ourselves to others. It is complete innocence, living fully and unabashedly in the moment." -Storm Faerywolf, on the Iron Pentacle

"Pride emerges when our will is engaged and we stand upright in our truth. We are often misinformed about what pride is. What is called “pride” in our culture is often merely arrogance, or what I call 'false pride.' Arrogance has its flip side in self-depreciation, which is just another face of the arrogant posture." - T. Thorn Coyle, Evolutionary Witchcraft

In today’s edition of Let’s Use the Iron Pentacle to Unpack What Binds You, I proudly (ha!) present: pride. It’s a loaded word, and often used unkindly against others. For my own unpacking purposes, I’ll talk about pride in my accomplishments, because ideally, we should be proud of them, no matter what they are, and saying, “Hey I’m proud that I accomplished this thing,” shouldn’t immediately cause someone else to infer, “I did this, you didn’t, neener neener.”

I’m proud of my college degrees. I paid for them myself, no one paid my way through school, and I got my degrees while pregnant and then a new-mother. I had my child in my junior year of college. I left zir bio dad two weeks before zie was born, and I raised zir alone. I did my baccalaureate, post-bacc and graduate work as a single parent of a special needs child. I didn’t remarry until my child was eight years old, guys. My family didn’t help me out financially in terms of finances, but they did help me with childcare, and I acknowledge that their ability to do that is certainly a privilege, just like having the degrees themselves. During some of that time period, I worked full time and took my child to five sessions of therapy a week for zir’s early childhood intervention, and today you would hardly guess zie ever needed that kind of treatment. I am proud that I was able to give my child that privilege. Also during that time frame when I was teaching, I used to attend my students’ sports games, ran a writing critique circle, and wrote at least 500 words a day. I envy the energetic thing that I used to be. :-P On days when I write multiple things, y’all can see a glimpse of what I used to be like, and I can tell y’all that low spoon days are much harder for me to take than I let on, which is why I often distract myself with Supernatural marathons and crochet. I’m sure it’s some cognitive leftover of my Miss Jr Achiever Personality (I graduated high school as a sophomore in college) and protestant work ethic cultural baggage. It has been an adjustment to take my self-worth and pride away from work and academic achievement and transform it into an understanding that even if I had not accomplished these things that I’m so proud of, that I would still be worthy of Loki’s love and attention, and that even now, when I’m sick, and especially when I’m too ill to do much other than sit on the couch and watch SPN reruns and crochet, that I’m still worthy of Loki’s love and care. Truly understanding and believing this notion is a struggle for me sometimes.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Or, why UPG is personal, and why no one else's gnosis should get in the way of your relationship with Himself.

Loki is many things - charismatic, cunning, ruthless, loyal, loving. When I was a newer Lokean (yanno, still had the new car smell!), I used to worry that the sweet Husband that I had was somehow a false Loki or a sockpuppet or whatever godphone error. Over time, I've come to realize that it's not that someone else is wrong about Loki being harsh to them, or that I'm wrong in understanding His relationship with me, it's just that I'm not living with their Loki, and they're not living with mine. I suppose some of my feelings on Him are colored by perspective - it's not as if I've never been asked to do something hard - I left my mortal spouse, uprooted my child, lost a fair amount of zie's childhood pictures and keepsakes, many of which I'll never be able to replace, but the reason why He asked it of me was of Nyd, and still done out of love, so I can't truly be angry with Him or feel it unjust.

"Comparisons are odious," Elizabeth V once said to me, and she was right, though I'd take that a step further even, and say that comparisons are useless if they don't help you understand your relationship with Him. (And if Loki's not your Deity, feel free to sub Whoever's name in there, because He's by no means the only multifaceted Holy One.) There are times when UPG that differs from yours can be instructive and interesting, even if you don't experience it personally, but some is just useless. For example, I've seen people who swear that they have UPG of Himself being EEEEVIL or of the Aesir despising Him. Guess what? that UPG? USELESS to me, because it's not how I experience any of Them. I'm sure they'd find mine equally Not Helpful.

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  • Naya Aerodiode
    Naya Aerodiode says #
    There is room enough in the world for everyone's paradigm.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Fun fact about me: I have a degree in speech-language pathology, and my concentration was in clinical phonology with a heavy emphasis on linguistics. I love studying the sound systems of a language and how sounds are tied to meaning. Today I happened across Forvo, a linguistic site that specializes in using native speakers to demonstrate how to pronounce words. It is single words and not sentences, but it's still helpful in developing an ear for nonnative speakers.

Of course, Forvo has a list of Norse mythology terms and many other languages as well. I hope that resources such as this will help preserve and protect against linguistic extinction. Every language has its own way of expressing a view of the world, and the language we speak undoubtedly shapes the way we think about everything in the inner and outer world. As Pagans we are explorers of other worlds, and so preservation of language is as precious as any other resource.

Visit Forvo and find speakers of various languages. :D And say Loki's name. It is His month, after all. Download "Loki Laufeyjarson" MP3

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a Month for Loki: Mead (well, pyment)

For those of you unfamiliar, July has become a festival month of sorts for Loki. Sirius, the dog star, is known as Lokabrenna - Loki's torch or brand. Late July/August is when Sirius rises, and so many of us celebrate Himself in the dog days of summer.

Today I'm making Him this: 

It's not quite mead, but here in Florida, I have concerns about the heat messing up the fermentation process. We don't have basements, our ground isn't dirt so much as it is beach sand, so there's not really a dig down and find cool dirt to store things in. In Florida if you dig too deep you hit water. Seriously, I have white sand beneath my grass in my yard - it's the same stuff as the beach. Anyway, a local pal found an apiary right in our zip code, with fresh orange blossom honey, so I got a few pounds of it and we're experimenting. I'm in the cook down process right now, and it smells heavenly, and Loki's very excited.

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Greetings, gentle readers. July is known as a month for Loki, because in the dog days of summer, Lokabrenna (Loki's Torch) rises. For those of you unfamiliar, Lokabrenna is another name for Sirius. Himself is active this time of year, and many Lokeans honor Him this month by posting poems, recipes, or other devotional works. I'm starting my month with a recipe for Him - a meal of hearts.

Loki's lore includes the eating of hearts. Here in the modern US, we don't do a lot of cooking with organ meats, but for seidhr I experimented with cooking chicken hearts, because it was what I could get my hands on locally. I offered Loki some, and He was positively FERAL and overjoyed to get them, because it is such a rare treat. So I'm gonna encourage y'all to try offering Him hearts, and since people usually don't know how to cook organ meats (I had to play Hail Lady Google), I will offer my own experience. I started with this recipe, because it involved grilling the hearts, and if you're familiar with Gullveig in the sagas. you know that He found her heart smoldering in embers and ate it, and barbecue is the closest that I can offer to that experience right now. If I ever get my lungs to a state where I can go camping and not have to worry about campfire smoke messing with them, I'd like to attempt cooking a larger heart for Him the way you do a baked potato, cooked straight on the coals, rubbed with butter and herbs, wrapped in tinfoil. 

I did a very Florida marinate for the hearts, with white wine, fresh garlic, ginger, a little mojo, key lime juice, salt, and pepper. I let them soak overnight and then sauteed them for 5-7 min, just long enough to cook them a little and then put them on the grill. As the recipe notes, if you use wood skewers for this, soak them or they will burn while the hearts are cooking. If you don’t have access to a grill, you could cook them all the way through and then put them under the broiler to give them some char. I have a friend who suggests that you cut the tops of the hearts off, but it’s my experience with Himself that He loves the WHOLE THING. NOMNOMNOM. I gather the hearts are more tender if you cut off the top with the aorta and veins. I only ate one to share the experience with Him, because I’m not personally big into organ meats, but He LOVED it, and I think He appreciated the gesture of me trying something that He loves. I'm also a big believer in kitchen witching - the time, love, and intention that goes into preparing meals and offerings is valuable and magical, and can be used to weave intention through mindful work.

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Greetings, gentle readers, I’m Heather Freysdottir and I’ll be your Lokean Swamp Witch. I’m a Godspouse, which is a type of mysticism that involves sharing day to day life with a Deity, Loki in my case. I know that some would consider that odd, but for me, it’s an extension of my understanding of the sacred. Yes, Loki is holy. I am holy. You are holy. The goal and desire in this Union is to acknowledge the sacredness of this World and Elsewhere, and to bring them together, and be present and aware of both.

When we cast a circle, it’s often said that we create sacred space, but in truth, every space is sacred, and by casting we acknowledge and create awareness of its holiness, and our own, and create a bond of kinship with the humans and Spirits participating in the ritual. A godspouse’s relationship is much the same. We come together with our Beloveds and go out into our communities and create awareness of the bonds that unite us to the Gods and the Land. We are a circle.

We are many other things too – friends, lovers, sons, daughters, wives, husbands, parents, or teachers. In many ways I’m the witch-next-door. I have a teenager at home, and I write and edit for a living. Going back to Loki, as most things in my life lead back to Him, in some twisting, turning way, He was my Muse for many years, though I didn’t know who He was, or that He was a God. And what writer doesn’t adore their Muse? But I’m not the only one to have Him as a Muse, or as a spouse – He enjoys the attention from many.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Liza
    Liza says #
    So excited to see you here!
  • Heather Freysdottir
    Heather Freysdottir says #
    Thank you!
  • Beth Lynch
    Beth Lynch says #
    Yay! Welcome to Pagan Square!

Title: Iduna and the Magic Apples

Publisher: MacMillan

Writer: Marianna Mayer

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

Greed & Rapacity: Loki BoundIn my last article I proposed to discuss an expression of Loki which tries to avoid the pitfall of declaring to be either for or against this complex and provocative figure. Unfortunately this will entail a bit of self-promotion on my part, because I intend to present and discuss the lyrics to a musical release called Loki Bound, which was released by Milam Records earlier in 2012. Loki Bound was performed by Greed & Rapacity, a band of which I am one half.

Loki Bound is a one-song 30-minute funeral doom metal descent into Loki’s stream of consciousness during his imprisonment by the Aesir, the primary Norse pantheon, for misdeeds real and (possibly) imagined. He lies chained by his son’s intestines to a deeply buried boulder, while a serpent drips venom upon him. His loyal wife, Sigyn, catches the poison in a cup, but when she goes to empty the cup, the poison falls on Loki’s skin. His agonized convulsions are the root of earthquakes, and it is fair to say that Loki is a deity of psychological tectonics.

Loki Bound is not easy listening. Yet the project was born out of a spirit of empathy – not, it must be said, sympathy. Empathy.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Henry Lauer
    Henry Lauer says #
    Think of me as a perennial weed
  • Robin Clear
    Robin Clear says #
    Wow, Everywhere I go there you are.
  • Michele Briere
    Michele Briere says #
    Your thoughts on Loki are very interesting. My path is Sumerian (actual Sumerian, not that Sitchen-Necro crap), and I have always

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