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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Hermes
Pagan savings challenge, week thirteen:  lies we tell

One of the gods I regularly worship is Hermes, who among his other associations is god of the marketplace, and god of lies.  If you've ever purchased a car, the link between the two shouldn't come as any surprise; lies are part and parcel of what makes money work.  In fact, it's reasonable to argue that money is itself a lie, or built on one.

That does not erode money's influence or role as a holder of energy (value), although the fact that some people avoid money entirely is understandable.  Rather than resist the lies, I prefer to use them to my advantage.

Savings, at least for people like me who spend money like it's going to buy happiness, is all about lies and self-trickery.  A friend of mine recently told me that he's hesitant to get a second job because his track record was to be less responsible the more he makes.  For him, that meant socializing, likely with alcohol.  Endorphins running high can make spending easier, with or without alcohol, so I counsel a few well-placed lies to stop behaviors before they start.

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  • J'Karrah
    J'Karrah says #
    I always round payments UP to the nearest dollar in my checkbook. Meaning a bill payment of $128.35 gets rounded up to $129 in my

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Poseidon, god of the economy

I took an unscheduled blogbatical as we moved into the darkest time of the year, but I have emerged excited that I missed celebrating perhaps the most important historical festival for my patron deity.

Today is when the festival honoring Poseidon, called Poseidea or Poseidonia, was celebrated in antiquity.  It's a reconstructionist's nightmare, because virtually no record of what went on has been discovered, but the good folk of Elaion put together a Poseidonia ritual based on their understanding of what festivals were usually like.  I didn't see the announcement until just after the agreed-upon time to practice apart together, and I was already late for Quaker meeting, so I had Poseidon close to mind as I joined my local Friends in worship.  (I am not a Quaker, although I attend meeting for worship; I have pondered how Quakers and polytheists fit together for awhile now.)

When I sit in the silence like that, it is an opportunity to complete the conversation.  Maybe I'm too busy with orthopraxy, or I can't multitask well, but I don't often get messages when I make offerings to my gods.  To put it simply, ritual is the way I talk and meeting is when I listen.  Today I listened, and pondered how important Poseidon was to the ancient Hellenes.  The sea was vital, not only as a food source but as the primary medium of commerce.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Ward, That Canadian $20 bill is wicked cool. Wonderful image, and so appropriate to the discussion.
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    I was thrilled to discover that image -- I feel it was created just for me!
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Ward, Brilliant post. I'd honestly never thought of Poseidon's role with regard to the totality of human economies. It's so t

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Young Hermes finds his grandfather sitting on his throne pensively gazing across his island lost in thought.  “Grandfather tell me a tale.”

b2ap3_thumbnail_Kronos.jpg

“My tale is a tale of heartache and joy lost,” said his grandfather, never once looking at the child at his feet.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Thank you again for recounting the God lore! I like the child/grandparent storytime motif.
  • Melia Brokaw
    Melia Brokaw says #
    Happy to share! I'm glad you like it!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Local spending is intentional spending

Whether it's your local metaphysical shop, farmer's market, or hardware store, buying local is an easy path to intentional spending.  The 3/50 Project is my preferred method of encouraging local spending, because once you get past the sometimes-confusing name, it's an easy way to redirect existing money to local businesses.

The 3/50 concept is this:  take fifty bucks each month, and spread it around three local businesses instead of using it at chain stores, franchises, or online.  The project has a pretty specific definition of local business that focuses on the amount of money which stays in the community.  One thing I like about the concept is that it stresses balance -- don't avoid big-box stores entirely, if that's where you get the best deals on some items, but do spend some money in businesses owned and operated by your neighbors.

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  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Thank you! A wonderful way of remembering that our spending is a spiritual practice!
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    Thank you! We spend all the time, and I'm sure that's the mystery of money: turning its flow into something more powerful than t
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    This is an absolutely wonderful idea! Helping our local businesses makes the world where we live a better place. Thank you for sh

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

A tale for your reading pleasure...this came to me today as I was researching another topic.

A woman frantically spins a crystal in the light from the window making rainbows swirl around the room.  “Iris, storm-footed and golden winged, you who nursed my child when I could not, hear me.  My boy has been taken from his cradle by Apollon, furious to behold.  Tell his father!  Bring my baby back!”

b2ap3_thumbnail_Iris-nursing-Hermes.jpg

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Thanks for writing the story and sharing it with us!
  • Melia Brokaw
    Melia Brokaw says #
    I am pleased that it has been well received. Thank you.
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    By "came to me" you're saying that the tale just popped into your head during your research? If that's the case, I find it uplift

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