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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in children

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
When a Child's Pet Dies

 

 

Last night I received a heartbreaking email from a reader. He was emailing me because his child's cat had been hit by a car and he and his wife were at a loss as to what to tell her (the girl is about six). They have an active devotional practice and an active practice of ancestor veneration. They neither wanted to approach death as something wrong and to be hidden, or to lie to their child, but neither did they want to cause their little girl an iota's worth of unnecessary pain. They asked me what I suggested. With their permission, I'm going to share with you what I told them, but I want to preface that by a disclaimer and a story. 

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  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    wise advice. I agree, no point in hiding death from children. it is part of life.
  • Linda Armstrong
    Linda Armstrong says #
    Your article moved me very much. I'm a long way from being a child (67) but sooner than I would want, I'm going to need to say go

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Rufus, the shih tzu puppy, was so excited he could barely keep still. Even though he tried to stay calm, his tail seemed to have a mind of its own. It wagged furiously as he danced around and around Mama's legs.

“OK, little boy, settle down,” she said, as she read over again the piece of paper in her hand.

He didn't care what was written on it. All he cared about were those nine words Mama said when she unfolded the mail. “Oh! The Mid-Winter Pagan costume ball. Want to go?”

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
What if I Were a Normal Mom?

A recent household occasion presented an opportunity to implement a natural solution instead of using a chemical-laden product. My daughter Emily is eleven-going-on-20 and upon her happy discovery of my homemade concoction, she sat quietly for a while and then asked, “If you were a normal mom, what would you have done instead?” Huh. If I were a “normal” mom, what would I have done? This question has sat within for a few weeks now and it has led to a good chuckle more than a few times. Emily and I did talk about her question at that moment because I was curious to know what she defined as being a “normal” mom compared to being a mom (perhaps me) who is “not normal”. It generated a lot of laughs between the two of us and offered up great time to connect deeply.

If I had been asked this as an ungrounded new mom years ago, my psyche easily could have taken a backseat on the train toward the villages of Panic and Self-Doubt. I suppose there have been conscious choices which have been made through the years to define myself in her mind as being somewhat “not normal” as she places that language in her mind. Upon inquiry I learned that she sees me laughing. A lot. Singing, playfulness, prayerfulness, and random dance moves are busted out at random times of the day, often early in the morning in the kitchen while I "should be" packing her lunch for school. Dress-up consists of wrapping ourselves with big swatches of colorful fabric and then often these pieces are brought outside on windy, sunny days to watch how they shape-shift in the light and air.

Friendships are deeply cherished and close friends are looked at more as family. Gypsy-family members often stay here at our home to receive the “Love Boot Camp” experience where everyone knows it is ok and even encouraged to bust out their own random dance moves, participate in spontaneous jam sessions, and be offered healing sessions at sometimes late hours of the night if that is what is called for. It's ok to cry here and there is always a set of arms, usually many, which are available for embrace. We hold summersault contests up and down the hall and create ceremonies around the fire out back. We listen to a lot of music; the type depending on our moods, but I’m known in Emily's mind for listening to “hippy” and “spiritual” stuff while she prefers classical, jazz, and talk radio.

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  • Jennifer Mills
    Jennifer Mills says #
    Oh, Paola, thank you. She is quite the wise woman indeed. When she was two, she would ask her father and I to play a game where
  • Paola Suarez
    Paola Suarez says #
    Ha! I love it when they remember in that way. So wonderful!
  • Paola Suarez
    Paola Suarez says #
    We all choose our parents as spirits and I'm sure you provide the right mix of magic and love for your old soul of a daughter. Tha

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Building a Tree

I have wanted a Tree of Life pendant for a few years now.  I look at them then think "I can make one of those."  But it's finding the time to actually make one.  

A couple weekends ago, my husband was going to go to work in Maryland (six hours from where we now live), so I decided it would be a good time to start, so I started the circle.  The weekend was going to hold just my girls and I again and we didn't have any plans, great time to start crafting.  They love it when I sit and craft.  I love it as well, it calms me, grounds me and helps me remember who I am deep inside.

The next day, after my husband and son left and I woke and started my morning chores.  After a while, I sat and I began the roots.  My girls watched now and again in between episodes of a new show they were watching.  It's my first attempt, and I'm taking it slowly. I tend to get "tunnel vision" and I didn't want to turn this into a chore that had to be done by a specific time.  

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  • JudithAnn
    JudithAnn says #
    What a beautiful Tree of Life and meaningful story of it's creation. You inspire me to try my hand and making this symbol as a rem

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

For many, the Summers Solstice is a time for Sun, Sea and Sand, the longest day and the official start of summer in the West--a good time to create a shadow box altar to honor this turn of the wheel.

Before we get started, I want to tell you why shadow boxes are important. They are not only seasonal reminders of our 8 holy days, but they take concentration and focus. By thinking about the elements that go into the box, you are also centered on the meaning of each box. What represents Beltain? Should I include a maypole? What can I use from my environment to honor the gods at Imbolc? (The image below is a Beltane altar--in miniature!--and made from clay, beads and found objects.)

 b2ap3_thumbnail_Beltane-altar-closeup.jpg

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Probably better to start with what Broomstix was.

Keeping this short, as the real fun is the content to come: From 2006 to 2010, www.broomstix.com was an online magazine filled with stories, crafts and journal activities, ancient traditions and magical tools, and a growing collection of lovable characters to teach kids about alternative spiritual paths. Willow the Seeker took readers to Sacred Spaces, the cows of the Lapidairy revealed the esoteric qualities of crystals and stones, and readers were challenged to reflect on the world around them as they built their own Book of Shadows. Great fun, the old Broomstix...

b2ap3_thumbnail_Zaman_FirstPaganSquarePost041913.jpg

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

 

My apologies for not posting regularly. Here is my excuse:

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_April2.JPG

 

Teaching your children magickal alphabets could be especially fun ifyou have more than one child. They may enjoy communicating with a “secret code”. You might also want to teach them one of these systems to encourage creative writing or as part of their spiritual upbringing. There are a variety of alphabets you might consider sharing with your child.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Imbolc, with the Littles

As you may have gathered from my recent post, I rather love the upcoming holy day and the Divine whom it honors. I want to share with you some of the fun Brigid things we did as my daughter was growing up.  Some of it is old lore made fresh, some of it is new.  I don't know the difference any more--it is all so deeply ingrained in my knowings around this coming of Spring.  I shan't give you sources for what I do, except that I do them and have done them for many years.

Imbolc is a wonderful time for children and there are many ways for the Littles to be involved.  On the night before Imbolc begins (which we celebrate as a three-day festival), Brigid travels the wide World, accompanied by a Cow.  She brings blessings to children and to pregnant women and She has many places to visit.  Those good children who love Bridey know that before bedtime they need to do three important things.

First, they must set out a little bed for Her to rest upon.  We always made one from a shoe box.  We'd roll up some soft batting and tuck a cloth napkin around it.  A lace handkerchief made a pretty pillow and a thick cotton washcloth looked much like the cotton blankets we had on our own beds.

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  • Byron Ballard
    Byron Ballard says #
    She's extraordinary...so many tales are attributed to Her, so many wonderful traditions. I also use the time of Imbolc in its gui
  • Pumpkyn
    Pumpkyn says #
    I have recently began reading the book "Candlemas, Feast of the Flames" by Amber K, and Azrael Arynn K. Have you read this book?
  • Pumpkyn
    Pumpkyn says #
    Wow, those are wonderful traditions to share with little ones. I will definitely have to incorparate some of those into my own tra

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