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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Review: The Undertaker's Daughter

 

The Undertaker's Daughter is the second album from singer/songwriter Mama Gina. It is a collection of stories, myths, and tales from her life that inspire and touch the listener. With this album, she is set to make a big impact in the Pagan music genre. Look out, world! Here comes Mama Gina.

 

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  • David Oliver Kling
    David Oliver Kling says #
    I enjoyed her song "The PSG Song," after having been to several Pagan Spirit Gatherings I can visualize the experiences he shared

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Review: The Fifth Element

The Fifth Element
by Kellee Maize

Female Pagan rap artist Kellee Maize released her fifth album, The Fifth Element, on February 14th, 2014. The album features 11 tracks of fun, funky hip hop and rap songs with a spiritual beat all their own. The overall theme of the album is Love. Every song deals with the subject of love in its own distinctive way.

The music is a refreshing, positive message of hope and love. "Anyway" is a song about hope and making it through even the toughest battles, on a personal and on a universal level. "Gotta Love Me" is about self affirmation and taking the first step to being able to change the world. The title track sums up the album perfectly. "I am the love. I am the one. I am the mother, father, daughter and the son."

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  • David Oliver Kling
    David Oliver Kling says #
    "I Know You" has a nice dubstep sound to it and probably my favorite track on the album. Thanks for sharing this since I would ne

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Theosis

Often, to be free means the ability to deal with the realities of one’s own situation so as not to be overcome by them.” -- Howard Thurman

My personal faith journey has been colorful and has included many joyful and sorrowful memories. At one time in my life, in the early 1990s I was System Operator, or SysOp, for a computer BBS (Bulletin Board System) called Theosis. The BBS was sponsored by the Romanian Byzantine Catholic Eparchy nestled in cozy Canton, Ohio, an I had the sublime honor of maintaining and administering the BBS – albeit for only a short time. The story of my brief sojourn into BBS management seems a fitting story to tell for the first entry of this Blog that holds the same name. You must be reading this blog entry and asking yourself, “What does Byzantine Catholicism have to do with ‘Pagan Studies,’ and why call a blog Theosis?” Both of these are very good questions and worthy of an answer.

In Byzantine Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Christian theology the concept of Theosis is very important. Theosis is both a process and an end result of spiritual practice. Another term for Theosis is deification or attaining the “likeness of God.” Within Orthodox Christianity the idea of Theosis is the answer to the question, “What’s the purpose of existence?” But concept didn’t take root in the Western half of the Catholic Church or within Protestantism in part because of the influence of “Scholasticism,” or the emphasis on education and learning; however, the mysticism of the Eastern world relied heavily upon the theological concept of Theosis. The idea of becoming in a sense “God.”

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  • David Oliver Kling
    David Oliver Kling says #
    Thank you for your kind words. I look forward to contributing here and being a part of this community.
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Reverend Kling, you have explained and expressed these ideas more clearly than I can ever remember seeing them before. Thank you

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Magick Jukebox

Merry Meet! I am David Banach (pronounced like ganache, but with 20% less chocolate.), a new contributor to PaganSquare.com and Witches and Pagans.

I am an eclectic Pagan living in the greater Charleston, South Carolina area of the Unites States. I began my journey on the Pagan path about 1995 when I discovered that there were more ideas and paths to follow than the one I had been told was the only way. I studied new age philosophy and spiritualism until I discovered Paganism about 2000. I attended my first ritual on New Year's Eve, 2000. Since then, I have studied eclectic Wicca, Druidry, a small amount of Shamanism, and some Asatru.

Somewhere along that path I discovered Pagan Podcasts. The popular ones at the time were Lance and Graal, The Spiral Dance with Hawthorne, and a brand new show called The Wigglian Way. All of these shows would play Pagan music now and then. I was enthralled. To be able to hear my thoughts, visions and ideals put to my favorite form of media, music, was amazing to me. I developed an instant respect for the people that make this music and began collecting it.

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  • debra strasser
    debra strasser says #
    I enjoy your podcast and I appreciate your hard work.

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Not Giving It Up

Everybody wants you

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  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Right on, Joanna. You do not carry that chip alone! Many of the songs from my era had the same message, which I only began to r
  • Joanna van der Hoeven
    Joanna van der Hoeven says #
    Hi Ted! Thank you for your kind words! I wholly agree with you. x
  • aought
    aought says #
    It's so ubiquitous in our culture, you don't even hear it in the lyrics. I remember being quite old before it dawned on me that th

Posted by on in Studies Blogs

Many of the world's greatest songs, poems and novels were penned by people under 30.  Back then we were already empathetic, educated, full of restless energy and oh-so-intelligent. 

Every single day we wanted things to HAPPEN!  But there were aspects of life that we hadn't experienced, about which we could only speculate.  Years later, even in those cases where our speculations had been fairly accurate, living through the actual reality was far more traumatic than we had ever imagined.

Which is not to say that we hadn't done our best to prepare ourselves.  We were desperate in our attempts to figure it all out ahead of time; if we could do that, it would give us a sense of security.  That is when we formed many of our spiritual convictions.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Pagans Create

I fancy myself an artist on some days. On others, not so much. Some days I will roll on out of bed and jump to my feet with a dozen ideas raring to go inside my head. Other days I shlump out of bed, eyes barely open, brain still half-involved in the dream I’m just leaving. On those days I’m just hoping to make it down the stairs to get some caffeine into my system without injuring myself on the way down. A morning person, I am not. As a Pagan who’s been out of the closet for nearly a decade and a half, though, my brain is always yearning to create something. I often think most Pagans enjoy creating something out of nothing. Maybe you write, like me. Maybe you paint, or sculpt, or knit, or make jewelry. It seems to come naturally to us.

As Pagans, I think most of us are in tune with the earth and nature around us. Nature does many things, and I think the main thing she does big is create. We, as Pagans, as people who, hopefully, feel in tune and a part of nature, also yearn to create something. Something from the depth of our soul. I know I love to create. Even when my brain is half foggy with sleep, I often wake up out of bed with an insistent self-reminder to “finish that book” or “start this painting” or something of the sort. I recently became interested in learning how to knit. It’s a mystery how someone starts with fibers, and ends up with absolutely scrumptious sweaters, scarves, or hats. But I want to learn. I feel an urge to learn.

Maybe it’s because as Pagans we love to create something that’s an expression of us. I attempt to create many works of art. Mostly stories. As a fiction writer, I am making things up and writing them down and hoping some people will enjoy what I’ve created. It’s intensely personal. It’s like taking a part of me, like a part of my heart and soul, showing it the world and hoping it’s something other people will be interested in. I know I enjoy writing, and my imagination is full of ideas for a dozen stories.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
March Begins the Travel Time

I'm home from Sacred Space Conference where I had the very best intentions of blogging it day-by-day. But here's what happened--I was so busy teaching and seeing old friends and having an excellent time, that I simply didn't do that. I'm going to try to encapsulate some of the juiciness of this good conference over the next few days, as I unpack and do laundry and prepare for some new workshops in the Asheville area and prepare to go out on the road again in about a month, when I visit the Gulf coast.

This was my third time at Sacred Space and I will say that the third time was the charm for this conference. I was a featured teacher the first two times I went up but this time I was a regular old teacher, doing two classes and participating in a panel discussion of Appalachian folk magic.

But I am tired now and looking forward to my own bed.

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It's almost Spring, a time to celebrate the return of the flowers, the awakening of the animals, and the renewal of the earth. Forest, farmland, the wilds, and the animals that depend on them need our help to maintain a clean environment and safe habitat (and humans need this as well!). Here are a few organizations working to make us all aware of the special balance between Nature and people everywhere:

Forever Forests is a group started in California by Gwydion Pendderwen, a Pagan folk singer and writer. He strove to help re-forest the areas of logged-over lands in California. Although Gwydion passed away in 1982, other Pagans have continued the work. Tens of thousands of trees have been planted since 1977.

Established by the late Steve Irwin, and continued by his family and partners around the world, Wildlife Warriors salvages habitats and provides education on an international level.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

We talk about “Christianity,” as if there actually were such a thing.

But of course there isn't.

You'd think that pagans, of all people, would know better.

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  • David Oliver Kling
    David Oliver Kling says #
    You could say the same with the following scenario: "A Unitarian Universalist, and a Unitarian Universalist, and another Unitaria
  • Patrick
    Patrick says #
    Christian missiologist Andrew Walls once asked if the proverbial Martian came to earth and visited (I forget his exact examples, b
Challenges for Pagan Youth, In Their Own Words

The results are in! You may have seen my last post discussing a survey question I sent out to my youth network asking what their favorite part about being a young Witch or Pagan is. The results were surprising to most but I can’t say I was very surprised. However, the results of this survey question did surprise me a little.

To a network of thousands of young people on social media and email, I asked “what is the biggest challenge for you, being a young Witch or Pagan?” I received over sixty responses within 48 hours. Here is a small sampling of the responses:

For me it's age-hate from older pagans. 'you're too young to have an opinion!...you can't know more than me, I'm 30 years older than you!....quit trying to argue your beliefs you're a little kid!' I think it's horrid and ridiculous to think age = knowledge and the right to an opinion. Everyone has opinions and their own beliefs. And who knows, maybe that 21 year old witch has been studying since they were 15...that's 6 years. Whereas that 45 year old Witch could have only just been shown the path of Witchcraft. I also find a lack of resources horrid...most teen-focused books are 'spells for teenage witches who want to smite their bullies with magic' etc.

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  • Lily Taylor
    Lily Taylor says #
    I think one explanation for at least some of the people saying that lack of resources is something they are having a problem with
  • Ruth Pace
    Ruth Pace says #
    my thoughts and advice: age-hate - the only times I've ever put anyone younger than me down, was BECAUSE someone who was 21 years
  • Steven Metlak
    Steven Metlak says #
    The tradition that I belong too was founded to be an inclusive, educational church. When we conducted the main ritual at the loca

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
On Veils, from PantheaCon

Picking up where I left off my previous blog about PantheaCon –

On Saturday evening I went to a workshop called “Taking Up the Veil,” with Xochiquetzal Duti Odinsdaughter.[1]  The description in the program intrigued me:

 

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  • Candi
    Candi says #
    Sometimes this topic makes me upset, and sometimes it doesn't. I've deliberately gained weight at certain points in my life in or
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    Thanks for your comments, Constance. It's a complicated issue. As you said, the choice must always be that of the wearer.
  • Constance Tippett Chandler
    Constance Tippett Chandler says #
    Dear Aline, Part of my religious past was spent in the Hari Krishna Movement and we where expected to have our heads COVERED. It w

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

Try the Doors
Long term trauma, shamanism, bodhisattvas. Alice down the rabbit hole sees a tiny door. Hear me when I say, "You will triumph."

a1sx2_Thumbnail1_TryTDoors.jpgIf trauma is the door to shamanism, can long-term trauma make you a bodhisattva?

Yes, I made a joke. But not entirely.

What doors do you neglect?

What door is in front of you right this second?

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  • Amoret BriarRose
    Amoret BriarRose says #
    This reminds me of the Ralph Waldo Emerson quote: “I dip my pen in the blackest ink, because I'm not afraid of falling into my in
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Ah, you are in the fellowship of survivors whose joy also survives. Whew, it is a ride! Thanks for the supportive comment and the
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    So good to hear from you again, Francesca. I was a mite worried about what I perceived to be an extended silence, and am happy to

I wrote this blog as a contribution to recent discussions of polytheism vs. monotheism on PaganSquare when I noticed several people asserting that "most pagans" are "polytheists."  I do not call myself a polytheist because while I affirm a multiplicity of images, for me they all point to a single divine presence in the world.  I offer the below musings in a spirit of dialogue.  I am interested to hear from those who call themselves "polytheists" whether they are speaking of a plurality of images and stories pointing to a "unity of being" or whether they are also saying that there are a "plurality of (sometimes) conflicting forces" that they would call "divinities."

In Rebirth of the Goddess I noted that monotheists were the ones who defined the term polytheism and wondered if in fact there really were any polytheists in the history of the world. I posed this question because monotheists assert that polytheists not only worship or honor a "diversity of images," but also insist that polytheists believe that there are a "diversity of conflicting and competing powers" in the world.  Monotheists might even go so far as to say that polytheists deny that there is a "unity of being" underlying all of the diversity and difference in the world.

For me the notion that "the world is the body of Goddess" (or divinity) is more primary than multiply elaborated images, names, and stories about divine beings. I am less moved by myths of Goddesses and Gods than I am by images of the Goddess that incorporate plant and animal as well as human qualities. In one sense I am closer to animism than polytheism.  It is the beauty of the world that moves me to reverence.

In recent years monotheism has been attacked as a “totalizing discourse” that justifies the domination of others in the name of a universal truth. In addition, from the Bible to the present day some have used their own definitions of “exclusive monotheism” to disparage the religions of others. Moreover, feminists have come to recognize that monotheism as we know it has been a “male monotheism” that for the most part excludes female symbols and metaphors for God.  With all of this going against monotheism, who would want to affirm it?

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  • Katy Bailey
    Katy Bailey says #
    I believe every religion is right in some way, as people tend to get "results" from each one, if that makes any sense. So it's lik
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Thanks for the essay and the dialog it engendered. Forgive me if my experiences and thoughts are tangential to the discourse here
  • Natalie Reed
    Natalie Reed says #
    I must admit that I am a bit on the fence over the whole definition of Polytheist issue. I don't purport to know the answer as to

         This is part III of what will be a three or four part series on the social implications of Pagan religion. 

         Some Pagans probably found my previous essay on alternative forms of economic organization,    such as the Mondragon workers cooperatives, far removed from a strictly Pagan site’s expected interests.  At first glance it does seem far removed.  Here is why I think it is not and in fact goes directly to who we are.

Among the world’s Pagan traditions NeoPaganism is particularly open to coexisting happily with the modern world.  Our roots are in this world and most of us do not look backwards towards earlier Pagan times as being in most respects preferable to modernity.  But there is one important point where we clash fundamentally with modernity’s dominant attitudes, be they of the left or the right.  We see, and many of us have powerfully experienced, the world as inspirited.  Not only human beings are expressions of Spirit, so is the world itself. In sharpest contrast, the modern worldview treats the natural world as a storehouse of resources that acquires what value it has by serving us. 

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. diZerega, Thanks for another great post! Two things: You've reminded me of why I cancelled my subscription to The Economist,
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    I'm also a big fan of silent film generally, and Fritz Lang's German stuff in particular. I'll remember your post the next time I

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Do Women's Circles Actually Matter?

“We need rituals of memory…because a political movement, the public policy and tactics of our movement, does not come from our ideas, but from the bloody and joyful substance of our lives. We need to be conscious about what our lives have been, to grieve and to honor our strength, in order to break out of the past into the future.” –Minnie Bruce Pratt

Last year, I was feeling depressed and discouraged after reading some really horrifying articles about incredible, unimaginable violence and brutality against women in Papua New Guinea who are accused of being witches as well as a book about human trafficking around the world (I wrote about this book in a post for Pagan Families). Then, I finished listening to David Hillman on Voices of the Sacred Feminine, in which he issued a strong call to action to the pagan community and to “witches” in the U.S. to do something about this violence, essentially stating that it is “your fault” and that rather than spending energy on having rituals to improve one’s love life (for example), modern witches should be taking to the streets and bringing abusers to justice. And, he asserts, the fact that they don’t, shows that they don’t really “believe”—believe in their own powers or in their own Goddess(es).

This brought me back to a conversation I had with a friend before one of our last women’s circle gathering…does it really matter that we do this or is it a self-indulgence? We concluded that it does matter. That actively creating the kind of woman-affirming world we want to live in is a worthy, and even holy, task. I’ve successfully created a women’s subculture for myself and those around me that comes from an ecofeminist worldview. However, is that actually creating change? Or, is that just operating within the confines of a damaging, restrictive, and oppressive social and political structure? Last time I facilitated a Cakes for the Queen of Heaven series, I made a mistake when I was talking and said, “in the land that I come from…” rather than saying, “in my perspective” or “in my worldview.” This is now a joke amongst my circle of friends, we will say, “in my land…that isn’t what happens,” or “let me tell you what it is like in my land.” I have to feel like that DOES make a difference. If we can share “our land” with others, isn’t change possible? Doesn’t “our land” have inherent value that is worth promoting, protecting, and populating?

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  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Lovely, sensitive, well thought out. As David Hyde Pierce remarked about the current level of funding for Alzheimer's research, "
Family Reconnections and the World Reversed

Healing a family rift is a tricky thing, especially when it’s something that you didn’t know you wanted at the time you should be wanting it. It’s a matter of acknowledging a missing piece of yourself when you thought you were whole in the first place.

I thought I was whole and ready to marry my fiancé. I thought a lot of things. And I thought I could do it without my father and stepfamily in my life. And I was wrong.

Backstory: I hadn’t spoken to my father in 15 years prior to 2 days before my sister’s wedding last year. I knew he would be there. I knew I would have to face him. Knowing I would have to didn’t make things any easier... it was something I would have to face head-on.

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Pagan savings challenge, week ten:  hardships

This past week has been a tough one on the household budget.  If money flows, then my household was at the top of a hill watching it flow down and away at an alarming rate.  When money is leaving faster than it's arriving, it can lead to some interesting reactions . . . such as a stronger urge to spend what you've got, to stock up for bad times.  Or to choke off the flow entirely and preserve what you've got, even though this will also likely stop the inward flow as well.

It's hard to save money when it feels like you don't have any.

On the other hand, it's a good week for this moneyworking Hellenist to continue saving anyway.  Last week found me saving on Noumenia, and today is the eighth day of the Hellenic month, sacred to my patron Poseidon, who is the financial securer.  I needed this reminder that money's flow cannot be stanched in one direction only, and that security should not be confused with stagnation.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

You are a graceful goddess, our Earth:

poised on tiny feet, powerfully hipped,

you sing a song of becoming as you dance,

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Eschewing money

Money is a power that we have given disproportionate influence in our lives.  One of the ways that some people -- Pagans and others -- try to deal with that is through voluntary poverty, avoiding the stuff entirely, or as much as possible.  It's a choice that is controversial and poorly understood, and its impact isn't entirely clear.  As part of my money ministry, I'm trying to wrap my head around the many ways we can relate to it, including its rejection.

One thing that has become apparent to me is that there are limits on how much one can change through voluntary poverty or other money-avoidance schemes, such as simplicity and joining an intentional community which doesn't use it internally.  That limit is explained nicely by Lynne Twist in her book, The Soul of Money.  In the first chapter, Twist tells the tale of Chumpi Washikiat, a member of the Achuar people of the Amazon, who has been designated by his community to go out into the world and learn about money.  He moved into the author's home in the United States to do so.  Twist writes,

"His education about money was more on the level of inhaling.  Everywhere he went, the language and meaning of money filled the air, from billboards, advertisements, and commercials, to price cards on muffins at the local bakery.  In conversations with other students he learned about their hopes, dreams, and prospects for life after graduation, or as they put it, 'life in the real world' -- the money world.  He began to see how it is in America:  that virtually everything in our lives and every choice we make -- the food we eat, the clothes we wear, the houses we live in, the schools we attend, the word we do, the futures we dream, whether we marry or not, or have children or not, even matters of love -- everything is influenced by this thing called money."

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  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    Addendum: my source would like to clarify that e considers eirself to be one of the poor people, not apart from them. "Also, the
  • guy fawkes
    guy fawkes says #
    What strikes me about this whole discussion is that people never stop to question what money is in the first place. For instance t
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    I don't think money is a mass delusion at all. I do, however, think that it's one of many ideas that we have intellectualized so

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