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Lillian Comas

Lillian Comas

As a psychologist, healer, and writer Lillian Comas is interested in spirituality, feminism, and multiculturalism.

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

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    I'll go with you, I told my friend Lola over dinner when she mentioned her desire to do El Camino.  Struggling with recurring cancer, Lola was courageous and confident about taking on the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. My hometown priest used to talk about El Camino during Catechism class. Your sins will be pardoned when you arrive at the Santiago Cathedral, he used to say. As a child, I questioned whatever the clergy said, earning their accusations of being a Doubting Thomas.  Even though I did not believe the sin absolution story, the idea of walking El Camino intrigued me.  But I did not know why.  Did I have a secret sin that needed forgiveness?

    Years before my dinner with Lola, my best childhood friend Nayda invited me to do El Camino.  The pilgrimage was to be in honor of our sisterhood. I loved the idea--spending time with my sister-friend always brought me joy.  But, as life happened, Nayda became home-bound taking care of her ill mother. I can't do El Camino right now, she said.  So, when Lola mentioned her wish to do the Way of St. James, I jumped at the idea.

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  • Lillian Comas
    Lillian Comas says #
    Photo by Frederick Jacobsen

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

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My family name, comas diaz, means death and or dying in Spanish.  As far as I can remember, I have experienced a special relationship with death.  You see, death communicates in a strange way with me.   That is, it lets me know when a loved one dies.  For example, death speaks to me through premonitions, dreams, and physical reactions.  My first memorable encounter with the death of a loved one was during a lucid dream.  Dressed as a surgeon, I tried to save the life of a young man in an operating room.  “I hope no one died in Puerto Rico,” I told my husband Fred when I woke up.  “This dream was strange, ” I said.   “Dream?  That was no dream, you had a terrible nightmare all night long,” Fred replied.  The absence of messages from family that day relieved my anxiety.  When night approached, my cousin Alberto called.   “Our young cousin Chalito was in surgery last night after a car accident, “ he announced.  “Unfortunately, the doctors could not save him,” Alberto concluded.

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  • Lillian Comas
    Lillian Comas says #
    Hi Ted: Thanks for the information. I totally agree with you: Anne, you and I know what we know!
  • Anne Newkirk Niven
    Anne Newkirk Niven says #
    ah, Ted -- something else we have in common. At the age of 54, I've now outlived the lifespan of both my mother and father. Since
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Anne - It does create a more mature perspective on life, doesn't it? In one way more fatalistic and less expecting of miracles, bu

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

     In the middle of lunch, my father looked into my eyes and asked who I was. This question stopped me in my tracks. For a moment, I forgot my father’s illness.   Instead, I remembered that he was responsible for naming me.

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I grew up on a farm in Puerto Rico where I experienced  the full cycle of life.  My days were filled with domestic dogs, cats, goats, pigs, hens, and rabbits. As I took care of these animals, I learned to love them.  In particular, I welcomed the miracle of life with every new litter of animals.  I also encountered grief as I mourned the creatures when they died.  Amazingly, my nights were filled with different entities.  Lions, cheetahs,  giraffes, leopards, elephants, monkeys, and many other exotic animals visited my dreams.  Since childhood, I have been dreaming about the African wildlife.   Until now.  

I was fortunate to visit Tanzania during this summer.  Through the eye of my camera  I captured African animals, not to mention a multitude of bright colored birds.  Besides the magnificent wildlife and spectacular Tanzanian vistas, something unexpected captured my attention:  A tree.  Not a regular tree, but instead, a wish tree.  This beautiful tree had a large opening in its center.  “People come here and pray to the wish tree,” a Tanzanian man told me.  “Women who desire to become pregnant climb up the tree and enter its trunk,” he said with a mysterious smile.  “The sacred tree always grants females their wish. “

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  • Lillian Comas
    Lillian Comas says #
    Thanks, Lizann!
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Lovely, thank you for this powerful tree story!

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

I like to travel several paths. As a seeker, I know that I am not alone. I welcome you to this blog and invite you to journey with me. Our paths may be different—or maybe not. I can best introduce myself as a traveler. Although you and I may be different from each other, perhaps we travel the same road.

Curiously, I like to be in the borderlands. Between here and there. In such crossing spaces I feel both like an outsider and an insider—familiar, and yet, stranger. This duality has accompanied me all my life. At first, finding my way was difficult. When I was a child, I tried to believe what I was taught. However, my religious education fed my mind at the expense of my heart. I was thirsty for something that I did not know. It was not until I became a woman that I found myself. Spirituality, instead of religion, seemed to quench my yearning. My forebears’ teachings showed me the way. Mind, heart, and body connected when I remembered my ancestral knowledge. I am indebted to my ancestors’ exploration.

I come from a tribe of seekers who traveled with empty pockets. My ancestors journeyed with their hearts full of wonder and their souls deep with dreams. Throughout their travels, they incorporated diverse traditions into their beliefs. My forbears spiced up their life with a mix of Christianity, Native American (Taíno), Gypsy (Romany), and African (Yoruba) practices. Whenever I summon them, I try to reconcile multiple traditions by searching for their common elements.

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  • Hunter Liguore
    Hunter Liguore says #
    An interesting thought, "a tribe of seekers who traveled with empty pockets." We could all stand to travel a little lighter... tha
  • Lillian Comas
    Lillian Comas says #
    Hi Hunter: Thanks for your comment. Yes, we could all stand to ravel a lighter lighter. Happy journeying.

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