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Posted by on in Signs & Portents
The First Harvest

Happy Lammas/Lughnasadh! Known variously as Lammas (English) or Lughnasadh (Gaelic), the 1st of August is widely recognized in Western culture and the Anglosphere in particular as the ceremonial day of the first harvest as well as the high point of summer (and in some cultures the first day of autumn). Celebrated by both Pagans and Christians, Lammas is a day to break and commemorate the end of the growing season and the beginning of the harvest.

Here at PaganSquare, we’ve collected as many posts relating to Lammas and Lughnasadh as we can, both from our own website and others. We wish you a merry and bountiful harvest!

-Aryós Héngwis

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Welcome to the 2016 Midsummer/Lammas Tarot Blog Hop.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Chloe
    Chloe says #
    Funny, I'd never thought of the World as being burdened with knowledge before. Ready to end one cycle and begin another, yes. Bu
  • Boglarka Kiss
    Boglarka Kiss says #
    What you have written about, Arwen, it fully resonates with me. This is also how I see these two cards and their symbols, the Fool
  • Arwen Lynch
    Arwen Lynch says #
    Thank you so very much, Boglarka!
  • Aisling
    Aisling says #
    I love this, because I have been teaching a class for over 5 years called "Tarot: The Fool's Journey"....we really ought to compar
  • Arwen Lynch
    Arwen Lynch says #
    Aisling, I'd love to compare notes. I think that would be so much fun.

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

Sometimes you don't realize the power that energy carries.  I have been teaching my girls about energy, you know, how everything around us has a type of energy attached to it.  It's almost funny watching them as they discover this and the thought process clicks and they realize that there are reasons why they feel the way they do about things around them.

We talk about residual energy and how every person and thing that comes into our house leaves an energetic imprint of some sort.  As well, our emotions leave imprints of energy.  I explained that this is why we need to cleanse the house of energy as well when we vacuum, dust, and clean the house in the normal way that most people think about cleaning houses.  Intention plays a large part in this cleaning.  Most people who do not do energy work can still clear the energy out of their house through simple cleaning, as it is their intention to clean and make their space feel clean, feel fresher, feel better.  They seem to watch, pay attention as things change around them and us.  They are mindful of the people we meet and who come to visit.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
On Psychic Readings

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Colors of Lunasa

What are the colors of Lunasa?

Green and gold, one might think: the unripe grain, and the ripe.

And so it is. But these are the Lunasa of the fields, the Lunasa of Earth.

And there are other Lunasas.

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Lammas

Most people are familiar with the Celtic name for August 1st, Lughnasadh. Across the water it's known as Lammas Day.

From Leechdom, Wortcunning and Starcraft of Early England, a compendium of wonderful folk knowledge of early Anglo-Saxon England, here's a fragment of a charm using bread [hláf] hallowed on 'hláfmæsse-dæg' the traditional grain harvest day:

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Chathol-linn
    Chathol-linn says #
    Oh, one more thing. I went to the supermarket today looking for some appropriate flowers for the Lammas table. The local Wegman'
  • Chathol-linn
    Chathol-linn says #
    Hello. I am relatively new to Pagans and Witches. I’m glad I picked Lammas Day to join. My modest celebration of this cross quart

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

Lughnasadh, the first of the harvest festivals is traditionally held on the 1st of August. Lughnasadh/ Lúnasa, now the modern Irish name for the month of August means 'the commemoration of Lugh'. Lugh, or Lugus, is a god of law and skill, who in the Irish tales gained the knowledge of agriculture from the tyrant Bres. Lugh is commonly associated with the sun and Lugh is often thought to mean 'bright' in Proto-Indo-European, although it may also be related to 'leug' meaning 'to swear an oath' and even 'leug' meaning black. There are none the less other pointers to his solar nature, at least in Britain and Ireland, such as in his Welsh version Lleu Llaw Gyffes, meaning 'bright one with the strong hand' and the fact that his most famous possession in the Irish lore is a fiery solar spear. That said, connections may also be made between Lugh and the often forgotten Irish god Crom Cruach / Crom Dubh, whose name 'crooked head ' or 'dark crooked one' is also connected to the bowing grain and is remembered at this time on Crom Dubh Sunday, the first Sunday in August. Lugh has traces across Britain and Europe, with several inscriptions to him found in the Iberian peninsula. Depictions of him in Europe are often tripartite, or triple headed, suggesting a triple nature, so this is a god that is hard to get to grips with if we take the original evidence into account, and it may be that this dichotomy between the light and the dark is part of his nature.

In the Irish tales Lughnasadh marks the funerary games of Lugh's foster- mother, Tailtiu, who died clearing the land for fields. It is said that so long as she is remembered, 'there would be milk and grain in every house.'- that is, the land would be fertile so long as we honour her. Another name for this time, 'Brón Trogain' refers to the pains or sorrowing of the earth and reminds us that this time of abundance is due to sacrifice, of the wild earth and also of our own labours, so at this time of summery celebration there are traces of something more sober afoot. After all, solstice is passed, and the days will be darkening all too soon. It's later name, Lammas from the Anglo-Saxon 'hlaef mass', or loaf mass, shifts the focus from the wild earth to the gifts of agriculture, and the sacrifice of the grain spirit.

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